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on November 14, 2010
As an avid reader who follows the work of a certain author, I often wonder where they get their story lines, and how they develop their characters.. Adriana Trigiani not only writes fantastic novels, creating memorable characters, but in writing "Don't Sing At The Table", exposed who were the women behind the creation of some of the best characters. I clearly see her grandmothers in my favorite character, Nella Castelluca, the heroine in the novel, Queen of the Big Time .All of Adriana's female characters are women of strength and determination, much like the many of the women I knew growing up.

As an Italian American woman, I related to Adriana's grandmothers. Many of my generation had grandmothers & great-aunts who were self-employed, independent, whose husbands served in the United States Military during World War I (the forgotten war), got their citizenship, and during that time, their wives became automatic citizens once they married. Many lost their husbands at a young age, most didn't remarry. My own grandmother set priorities and raised my mother alone, working hard at sometimes more than one job, while running a household.

I saw my own grandfather and great-uncles in her grandfather. These were people, though they were immigrants, were much more at ease in the American culture. All of that generation had a strong sense of identity, they were comfortable with who they were. They had a set of rules that not only they followed but expected everyone else to adhere to. Adriana emphasized how important their expectations were. She also did a great job of blending the old world and the new world. She devoted a few pages explaining how much outsourcing has affected us..how we have lost quality and craftsmanship. All in all, I highly recommend this book if you are a Trigiani fan, as she has let you into her life. It gives you an understanding on what inspires Adriana Trigiani.
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on July 8, 2017
I have read several of Trigiani's fiction books and love them. Adriana Trigiani is such a good story teller that this nonfiction book read just as quickly. It was quirky and touching and just very entertaining. By the time I had finished the book, I felt as if I knew her grandmother's and learned from them as well. My only wish is that I could see the pictures better on my Kindle so I may have to look those up separately. It was an excellent read that I would definitely recommend.
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on September 11, 2016
I have enjoyed all of Trigiani's novels but this just didn't capture me. I found it to be rather dull and perhaps only of interest to someone who knows the author or her family. I would not recommend this book to family or friends but I'll not give up on the author. She generally writes interesting books but again, this just didn't cut the mustard with me.
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on April 7, 2017
I thought I would like this better because the grandmothers were the age of mine. But I got kind of bored. My grandmother was much poorer but was more fun and full of Stories and insights. The grandmas in the book had opportunities and they took advantage of them. They were outside of the norm in my community of big families and expectations that working mamas were considered to be neglecting their families. So, I didn't finish the book. I couldn't relate
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on October 30, 2016
What an amazing journey into the lives of her grandmothers who had such an effect on her life. I enjoyed her fiction , but am even more impressed with the telling biographies of her grandmother. How wonderful to have ha such strong and loving role models!
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on September 19, 2016
Now I must read all of Adrianas books ! Growing up with families of Italians around us in Little Italy I know of what she speaks. The love for their gardens - cooking in the basement - their recipes and hardworking values came shining through and reminded me of my childhood. I could almost smell the garlic frying. In between the tears for what I feel we all have lost, I had to go down and fry some sausage onions and pepper sandwiches. This book was certainly a grand testament to her Grandmothers on both sides. I thank her for sharing this wonderful and sometimes funny book.
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on November 12, 2017
I love all her books. I am reading anther one of hers right now. I’ll be impatient until she brings out a new one as this will be the last one of all her books. Wish they weren’t so expensive!
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on May 24, 2017
In the process of reading, I have immediately gotten into this book. I love autobiographies. So far, the book is excellent.
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on March 2, 2017
Good book and I clearly related. I have enjoyed various books from the author. She didn't disappoint. Looking forward to additional work.
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on October 3, 2017
This is a family story. Although I like family stories, this wasn't well written. Couldn't finish it.
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