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Dooji Wooji

4.9 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (April 10, 2005)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: CD Baby
  • ASIN: B00097DXU8
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #377,470 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By D. W. Girten on June 9, 2005
Format: Audio CD
When it comes to captivating, swinging vocals and witty lyrics few can hold a candle to Lorraine Feather. Her latest contribution Dooji Wooji is her best effort to date! Whether it is a hilarious rapid-fire tale of a female runner in her song" Indiana Lana" or the opener "Calistoga Bay," a swinger backed by a big band, Lorraine leaves no doubt that she is a singer whose lyrics will stand up and grab your attention.

Melodies on this CD compliment her lyrics. "Remembering to Breathe" is a graceful, sentimental ballad
on the lessons learned when young ladies take ballet. The snappy "Cicada Time" reminisces about the
seventeen year cycle of these noisy insects. There is irony in the swinging "Shameful" and warmth in the
sensuous "On the Esplanade." The floating vocals of Lorraine matched with a 1929 instrumental by Duke
Ellington in "Tryin' to Get Over" is just one of four pairings between these two.

In "I Know the Way to Brooklyn" the singer is able to kill the worst case of blues with her wit. The bluesy
and sensuous "Sweet Honolulu" has a solid boogie-woogie vamp to carry the listener through. Clever and
delightful lyrics matched with her vocals and the contributions of her collaborators make Dooji Wooji an
outing with Lorraine Feather that will entertain and stand the test of time!
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
Miss Feather has three magnificent talents.

First, an awesome gift for incredibly zany and intelligent lyrics that blend seamlessly with marvelous music.

Second, a great voice with perfect timing, enunciation and amazing precision.

Third, the ability to attract and collaborate with an incredible number of tremendous song writers and hot musicians.

Between her excellent work pulling gems out of Ellington's archives and her great interaction with some of today's best, she continues to create awesome tracks.

From the very tender sweetness of "Remembering to Breathe" to the runaway antics of "Indiana Lana"; from the wild entomology-meets-jazz piece "Cicada Time" to the fully believable "I Know the Way To Brooklyn", Ms. Feather has put together a marvelous treat. I found myself yearning to join the party on Calistoga Bay. There is nothing shameful about this album but one song title; Lorraine Feather is definitely NOT tryin' to get over on us, and when you listen in, you'll be happy you were there.

I guarantee that you will marvel at the skill level of all those involved in this splenid project.

Bravo!!
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Here, in the early 21st Century, jazz singing seems to have evolved (devolved?) into white chanteuses singing swing-styled numbers: Diane Schuur, Diane Kraal, Madeleine Peyroux, Dena DeRose and Lorraine Feather among them. Of course, however, there is a wealth of talent difference between them, as well as a sliding scale of listenability. Schuur and Kraal, for instance, have (to my ears) unpleasant voices but swing like mad; Peyroux, though she plays fine jazz guitar to accompany herself, basically does the most letter-perfect Billie Holiday imitation I have ever heard (though I do love her versions of "Was I?" and "Dance Me to the End of Love"); and DeRose is, far and away, the greatest overall female jazz talent we have seen since the flowering of Toshiko Akiyoshi, sort of a modern-day feminine Nat King Cole.

Lorraine Feather, daughter of one of the most famous jazz critics of the past century, grew up wealthy and wanting nothing. She also grew up totally immersed in jazz, as well as somewhat lonely and remote. As the child of a famous jazz scribe, something great was expected of her, a talent that did not blossom for many years. As someone who received, in her own words, "brains but not beauty," she was socially ostracized in the exclusive schools she went to, often isolated during her growing-up period.

But Lorraine has triumphed, and in a way that I'm not sure her famous father would have envisioned. She has become an excellent jazz singer - more on her quite unique style in a moment - but, more importantly, she has become the single greatest writer of vocalize lyrics in the entire history of jazz.
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Format: Audio CD
When Billie Holiday is your godmother, the trickle-down effect is inevitable. In fact, you almost expect Lady Day to show up on "Dooji Wooji" for a guest vocal. Feather, an extraordinary lyricist and vocalist, has crafted a musical time capsule that takes you back to the Big Band era. Her jazz is old school, filled with swingin' rhythms, playful lyrics and sweet singing. And she's no slouch at vocalese (the art of writing lyrics to an instrumental jazz song). The first track, "Calistoga Bay," turns Duke Ellington's "Harlem Air Shaft" into a playful romp that's such a perfect fit, it's hard not to imagine Sir Duke and Lady Feather banging it out at the piano together. Close your eyes, and you can picture Feather fronting a big band, singing into a boxy microphone and filling the dance floor.
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Format: Audio CD
It is quite evident that Lorraine Feather has a love affair going on with the music of Duke Ellington. Her last album, "Such Sweet Thunder" was all Ellingtonia; and her album before that, "Cafe Society", had a few Ellington cuts which were among the strongest ones on that album. But considering that Ellington was arguably the finest songwriter in jazz history, and Ms. Feather is (IMO) the top contemporary vocalese lyricist in jazz today, I hereby bless this musical marriage with a "You Go, Girl!"

And in that spirit, Lorraine Feather's newest, "Dooji Wooji", has 4 out of 12 cuts that are direct Ellington/Feather productions, and most of the rest sounds like the songwriter could have been The Duke. The whole album has a marvelous '30's-'40's feel about it, and its consistency makes it the best vocal jazz album of 2005 through the first 4 months of the year.

Lorraine Feather is an incredibly witty lyricist, and you hear her marvelous warp speed rhyming schemes in such tunes as "Indiana Lana", "Calistoga Bay" and "I Know the Way to Brooklyn." (I note that her lyrics don't sound early 20th century, however; I doubt that Duke's lyricists ever would have rhymed "Cicada" with "Yada-yada", or that they would have complained about not being able "to work the buttons on the damned remote"!) She is also a terrific singer, and best displays her vocal chops on one of the album's highlights, "On the Esplanade."

For me, the album's highlight is the last cut, "Happy You Were Here", which is the least "Duke-like" composition on the album. This works as a heartfelt eulogy to anyone or anything that ever mattered to you. (I understand that Ms. Feather wrote this song for her late dog. Works for me!) It is one of the finest original jazz ballads in years.
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