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Double Edge [VHS]

3.5 out of 5 stars 20 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Ziad Abu-Zayyad, Hanan Ashrawi, Anat Atzmon, Mohammed Bakri, Faye Dunaway
  • Format: Color, HiFi Sound, NTSC
  • Rated:
    PG-13
    Parents Strongly Cautioned
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • VHS Release Date: September 1, 1998
  • Run Time: 81 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6302645840
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #426,961 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
American journalist tries to show both sides. Who is right and who is wrong. There is no right or wrong simply retributions for killings on Jews and Palestinians by one another. Very sad and disturbing. Great acting, heavy issues. One human tragedy after another.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
The quality of the movie was excellent. The 4 stars is because I personally would have liked a less "in-the-air" ending - The point was definitely made and taken though! It's easy to have a very strong opinion about what is right and wrong and what someone else ought or ought not to do, until we find ourselves "in their shoes" so to speak.... Lesson taken, lesson learned. Thank you!
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Format: VHS Tape
This movie could have been a victim of Amos Kollek's vanity since he wrote, directed and acts in it, and his father is the Mayor of Jerusalem. But fortunately, he also had the sense to cast Faye Dunaway as his lead. In spite of being unable to shake off elements of the gorgon Joan (as predicted by Pauline Kael in her review of Mommie Dearest in The New Yorker), Dunaway lends her considerable presence and technique to the part of a temp journalist in Israel, eager to make an impression. She even gets to take her own photos, a la Laura Mars. At first Dunaway doesn't quite know to respond to Kollek as a suitor (and his performance is so ineffectual that he can't even read a joke well) but soon we get taken away by her and become reliant on her reactions. This film is an improvement on Costa Gavras' Hanna K, since Kollek's focus is stronger, and because he provides a positively brilliant ending, we're probably willing to forgive his own throw-away performance. This film also features Hanna K's accused terrorist Mohammed Bakri in a similar role. (Talk about being typecast!) It also contains interviews with various partisan leaders, including Hanan Ashwari, Abba Egan, and Rabbi Meir Kahane (who was assassinated shortly after the film was made). What is interesting is that the interviews don't affect the tone of the film, since Kollek introduces each location in a similar way, and also because there is no attempt made to allegiance. In spite of Kollek's character being Jewish he is still able to visit a Palestinian household without being murdered. I got a laugh at how Dunaway is offered Moscow as her next assignment, but it's an assignment I'd sure like to follow up on, since seeing Dunaway in the lead of a film is so rare these days. That's of course, if she survives her time in Israel.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
A brash young woman, a reporter, arrives in Israel full of pompous preconceptions. She doesn't find anything to like, thinks the Israelis are brutal, takes photos that are bound to be incendiary without investigating further, and in short acts like a lot of liberal journalists who go to Israel with the same bias. You have to watch this film all the way through, otherwise the entire point is lost. Various Israelis try to point out that nothing is as it seems, and the reporter tangles with a young woman in the censor's office-- naturally the reporter has no intention of working with the censor. Her lofty liberal ideals preclude any such concession to manners, even though she is a guest in the country. Faye Dunaway does a great job as the arrogant reporter who demands that the world to be what she believes it to be, instead of what it is.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
The movie tried to combine drama and documentary to explain the complexities of the Middle East. It failed. Too much stereotyping of both Palestinians and Israelies
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
What can I say, ending said it all except I do not know what happens end was just that left wondering what will or did happen a older film
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
Surprising ending. Thought provoking. Shared both sides of the conflict and the price paid for the hatred.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
An interesting look at the Israeli - Palestinian problem as it was about 30 years ago.
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