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Showing 1-10 of 24 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 37 reviews
on August 29, 2013
I'm not a mathematician. I had some math classes in college. A fair amount of this was beyond me. But I think the special case of Euler's formula, e^i(pi) + 1 = 0, is just beautiful.

Readers should be familiar with calculus, maybe even advanced calculus.

Nahin obviously loves Euler's work. It's as if he can't stop cranking out uses of the formula.

The brief summary of Euler's life was enlightening and uplifting, but reading about the treatment of Euler's partial blindness made me cringe.

If you like math, give this book a shot.
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on February 5, 2012
I bought this book when my daughter was home from college, she is an electrical engineering major and minoring in physics. At the time she was starting to learn Fourier, and she paged through this book and it took me 8 months to get it back. This provided an excellent study resource in Fourier series.

My point is that this book is not really a companion to his other book, which is more of a historical text which discusses the math, but is really a popular math book.

This book is a study of simply the math, and it is instructional on how euler is applied from the standpoint of e^piI. So it ends up being an excellent resource on Fourier, which encompasses most of the text. It is useful to study away from the typical textbooks, which are simply using it as a solution, and not as a goal of instruction.

This is not light reading, so it is for math types, and it the author as always writes in a clear style.
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on August 29, 2006
Here is a book that is a delight to read. It is well-written and the text flows marvelously between each page and around the many formulas that are so carefully presented and worked out. I rate this book as 5-stars for presenting ever more mathematics relating to complex numbers in a clear and detailed manner.

The book is, as the author notes, a continuation of his book, An Imaginary Tale, where Nahin discusses the square root of -1. (If you haven't read that book, read it first because many of the footnotes refer to it.) In this book, we see more of complex numbers and, in particular, we see many applications of Euler's Identity that "e^{i theta} = cos(theta)+ i sin(theta)." This simple looking indentity is rich in applications and explorations. Nahin takes you on a journey to these topics and does so in an easy to follow way.

There are interesting stories as you go such as the one where we find the Gibbs did not, contrary to almost all textbooks, discover what is call Gibbs Phenomena. There are other stories and anecdotes but I'll let you enjoy them on your own.

That said, I must also say that the book assumes you have a good understanding of complex numbers and are comfortable manipulating them. A solid undergraduate understanding is all that's needed and if you have done graduate work, all the better. If you're considering the book at all, and have the math background, read it.

If you don't know anything about complex numbers, well, this book may not be as good as it could be for you.
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on April 30, 2017
good
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on May 1, 2017
as Expected.
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on May 30, 2014
Still reading through the book, and it is an enjoyable book to read, just don't try to follow too closely and prove what the author is telling and showing you. A Harlequin Romance novel for mathematicians, but for the rest of us, diverting and amusing.
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on October 22, 2008
Well this time I don't agree with reviewers above in the sense that if we liked An Imaginary Tale, then this book would like us too.

Certainly I enjoyed a great deal An Imaginary Tale, but I hoped I would find much more in Dr Euler's Formula, as I was really very impressed the first time I met -in my second year of electrical engineering- the most beautiful equation in mathematics, as professor Nahin has pointed out, but I really was very dissapointed, that in this new book I did not find anything about the fact that Dr. Euler's Fabulous Formula is most remarkable because even with differentiation and integration the mathematical operations that represent change, Euler's Identity remains with the same form, except for being affected by the square root of minus one, i.e., by a process of rotation.

It is this remarkable property the one that permits

"to reduce steady-state sinusoidal problems to forms which are identical to those for resistive networks."

and that made that Charles Steinmetz was called

"the wizard who generated electricity from the square root of minus one"

when the great historical struggle between AC and DC current was solved by that famous paper of Steinmetz.

Yes, it was this remarkable property that made me think that Dr. Euler's Formula could cure not only many mathematical ills, but physical ones such as those of deducing both the pendulum formula and the Complex Schrodinger's wave equation, based in a complex metrics in which Euler's identity plays the fundamental role, an exercise that I did many years ago and put somewhere at LANL.

Of course, I highly recommend this book by professor Nahin, as you will find in it a real complement to Fourier series and Integrals and to the study of Dirac's impulse function in chapters 4 and 5 and an important application to electronics in chapter 6.
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on December 1, 2009
Notwithstanding that E=mc2 is a famous equation in physics, eipye+1=0 is the most famous and interesting relationship in mathematics. It has a fundamental information base second to no other. The author delves into many applications of the relationship in various branches of mathematics and engineering, as well as noting the ancient thinkers who recognized some aspects of it. I found this book fascinating, challenging, and even daunting. But try it, as it is also very entertaining.
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on January 7, 2015
This book is awesome! You have to have a reasonable mathematical background to appreciate it, but if you do, it's a gem!!!
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on January 15, 2016
very interesting
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