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The Dragonet Prophecy: Wings of Fire, Book #1 Audible – Unabridged

4.7 out of 5 stars 488 customer reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Wings of Fire #1: The Dragonet Prophecy, by Tui T. Sutherland (Scholastic, July 1, 2012, ages 8 and up) , is a winner. If you have a fourth grader who's read these series--Warriors, the Guardians of Ga'hoole, and How To Train Your Dragon--and who is casting around for a new book, this is the book you should give him or her. It is a must-have for the fourth grade library (which I don't think I've ever said about a book before) and I enjoyed it rather a lot myself!

Five dragonets, each from different tribe of dragons, were taken from their homes before they even hatched, and raised in hidden cave, knowing only each other and the cold dragon guardians who watched their every move. They were raised to be the dragonets prophesied to end a terrible and bloody conflict that was tearing apart the seven tribes (Sandwings,Mudwings, Skywings, Seawings,etc.)...but the Talons of Peace, the dragons who are raising them, are afraid that they've failed to meet the terms of the prophecy. Instead of a Skywing, they ended up with a Rainwing--a tribe of dragons sneered at for being lazy and useless.

And so the guardians plan to dispose of Glory, the little Rainwing.

But the five dragonets are a team, and when they hear that Glory might be killed, they plan a daring escape. Each has their own strengths, and their own weaknesses, and none has ever been outside before. Almost immediately, they are captured by the evil Queen of the Skywings, whose greatest joy is to pit dragon against dragon in her arena of death....There the Skywing champion, barely more than a dragonet herself, defeats all comers. But the Dragonets of the Prophecy are different from other dragons--they are not bound by loyalty to their own tribes, but too each other. And that loyalty will save them....
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Format: Hardcover
There are fantastic drawings and descriptions of each of the dragon tribes at the beginning of the book that made for a necessary reference when trying to keep the characters straight while reading. The dragons have human-like personalities, especially the dragonets, raised to bring peace to the world. The young dragonets have good hearts and not at all violent. Even the central character Clay, a MudWing, who supposedly attacked his peers' eggs as soon as he hatched - can't seem to bring forth that fury within himself again. So, when the dragonets emerge from their secluded place of protection and training, none of them are prepared for a world where dragons have lived in war for ages. The dragons on the outside are hard, violent, and cruel - with a vastly different set of moral conduct.

I absolutely fell in love with Sutherland's world of diverse dragons, intrigue, and prophecy. But the highlight of the story is certainly the five young dragons, and Clay in particular. Their bravery, selflessness for each other, and innocence is heartwarming in the midst of their dark surroundings. Wings of Fire is the first in the Dragonet Prophecy series with plenty of promise. The series is marketed for middle readers, but can be enjoyed by fantasy fans of all ages. Though it is somewhat dark and could be a bit violent at times for younger children. Full of adventure, suspense, fascinating characters, and plenty of surprises along the way - this novel was impossible to put down. I'll be eagerly awaiting the sequel, planned to release in January 2013.
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Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
First, let me say that I've only read through chapter 4, and although I plan to read the rest because I personally enjoy it, I won't be sharing it with my 7-year-old like I had planned because it is not age-appropriate for him. I got this (from Amazon Vine) because he is a very advanced reader (Amazon claims it is for ages 8 and up) and loves a good action story.

In the "Prologue," an evil dragon crushes the egg that a good dragon was carrying: "With an exaggerated lunge, Burn pretended the wet egg was slipping through her talons . . . and then she let it fall over the side of the cliff into the rocky darkness below." And later, she kills the good dragon: "Her claws ripped through the silver dragon's wings, shredding them as Hvitur shrieked in agony. With a swift movement, she stabbed her poisonous tail through his skull and flung the long, silver body over the edge of the cliff. The ice dragon's screams cut off long before the echoes of his corpse slamming into the rocks below."

While I understand how important it is to establish an antagonist in a great story like this, I object to the ever-intensifying violence aimed at younger and younger crowds. However, even if I did allow my son to read it, or if he came across it on his own, he would toss it aside because (1), he hates to see the good guys suffer, and (2) it's confusing!! I had to take notes to remember which dragon was which and who was at war with whom. I'm sure that he would be wildly confused. And the violence doesn't end in the prologue, unfortunately the dragons' training is based on fighting each other and their caregivers, sometimes brutally.

Essentially, my two-star review is aimed not at the story, which is really great, but at the targeted age level.
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