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The Dreaming Universe: A Mind-Expanding Journey Into the Realm Where Psyche and Physics Meet Paperback – June 1, 1995

3.9 out of 5 stars 16 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In his most boldy speculative inquiry to date, physicist Wolf ( Taking the Quantum Leap ) argues that dreams are a vital aspect of evolution, enabling an individual to develop a concept of self. The dream, in his formulation, is a map of possibility, a realm where synchronistic (i.e., noncausal yet meaningfully connected) events occur, producing self-awareness. Our dream images, even if we don't remember them, invade our waking consciousness as patterns that shape our lives, he insists. Wolf posits an "imaginal realm," halfway between material and mental reality, that manifests in lucid dreams (wherein an alert dreamer can control unfolding dream events), in near-death experiences, and possibly in UFO abductions. In this mind-stretching synthesis that challenges accepted beliefs across many fields, Wolf bolsters his thesis that dreams connect with physical reality by drawing on quantum physics, the works of Freud and Jung, modern dream research and Australian aboriginals' concept of an eternal "dreamtime."
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Kirkus Reviews

New Age border-crossings that blur more than clarify where physics and the dreaming psyche meet. As in The Eagle Quest (1991), physicist Wolf extends Jung's idea of synchronicity to explain the connection between an individual's dream and the ``dreaming universe.'' He finds Freudian dream theory analogous to, and as limited as, Newtonian physics- -it's no surprise that Jung in turn is praised as being analogous to Niels Bohr, ``the father/mother of quantum physics.'' Reverting to ideas explored in Parallel Universes (1989), Wolf considers the ``essential mystery'' at the heart of quantum mechanics, using a variety of coyly autobiographical anecdotes to suggest that the dreaming brain, by entering the unconscious mind, is experiencing synchronicity. It's this kind of sloppy mixture of anecdotal and scientific material that keeps New Age thought on the fringe. It doesn't get any better when Wolf throws in superficial chapters on ancient views of dreams, the research of neurophysiologist Benjamin Libet, and Crick and Mitchison's theory that ``we dream in order to reduce faults by feeding in certain `unlearning' inputs that poisoned the unwanted modes.'' In each, the analogies are all simplistic and reductive. Wolf claims that dreams are ``an altered state of conscious awareness,'' equivalent to a ``quantum mechanics of dreaming.'' But his thinking is confused; sometimes he uses quantum physics as a model or a metaphor to understand dreams, but ultimately he wants to posit a world in which there is no outer world of space and time separated from the inner world of mental activity, but only a third ``imaginal realm...of the big dreamer.'' Subjectively anecdotal, dilettantish wish-fulfillment. -- Copyright ©1994, Kirkus Associates, LP. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Touchstone; Original edition (June 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0684801590
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684801599
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,344,011 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
The Dreaming Universe picks up where most lucid dreaming books leave off... and challenges the reader to consider the deeper implications and significance of dreaming and reality. This book will excite and stimulate anyone already interested in the subjects of lucid dreaming or consciousness as it raises new questions and combines old ideas in creative new ways as only Wolf can do -- with his unique in-depth experience with physics, spirituality, and magic.
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Format: Paperback
Fred Alan Wolf takes us closer than ever to understanding the "Mind's Eye," and how the brain produces pictures through holograms.
Whether you agree or disagree with Wolf's conclusions, you can't read this book without learning something, or seeing something new in the world of consciousness, matter, and dreams. I highly recommend this book.
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Format: Paperback
This book is a must if you've ever wondered why it's easier to hunt deer with a computer game than it is to hunt the real thing. A computer (and the brain, according to some physicists) operate under Boolean theory. A program contains all possible scenarios at once, with overlaps in some segments of each. A specific inquiry narrows the choices, but ultimately, there is only one outcome. Fred Alan Wolf attempts to explain the variable 'instinct' that is the ancient universal holding place for all knowledge. Instinct can't be duplicated by a computer, so it must exist in a Quantum environment. A semi-conscious state like a dream would be necessary to access such an environment. An excellent thought-provoking read.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have always enjoyed the books of Fred Alan Wolf, but this one was a disappointment. It does contain some interesting nuggets of information, but they're scattered throughout the book, which attempts to deal with virtually every scientific and metaphysical theory under the sun.

By his own admission, Wolf skipped around during the composition of the book, which is probably why he continually says "I'll explain more about this later." Attempting to join holographic theory, quantum mechanics, synchonicity, Jungian psychology of the collective unconscious, lucid dreaming, UFO abductions, and dozens of other phenomena puts this book a tad over the top. I am no novice in reading metaphysics or science, but in the long run, I couldn't follow it. The organization has no coherent thread other than reality might be a dream.

The book may be worth the price if one is an avid Fred Wolf fan or if one is willing to sift through the pages to find those sections that lapse into intelligibility (or else read it numerous times until some of the difficult connections can be made). It's not a bad book, just awfully difficult and not Wolf's usual "layman's fare."
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Format: Paperback
This has much of the same information as the Holographic Universe (above) but worded in a more scientific way. I found Talbot's book much easier to read and just better overall. This book is highly worthwhile in it's own right although. If I had to pick one it would be Talbots.
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Format: Paperback
This is not light reading..It is a read that one has to take slow and think about. The information presented in the book is very thought stimulating. It is an excellent book and the author does a good job of simplifying a very complex subject.
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Format: Paperback
The book is interesting in that the author tries to relate human consciousness, quantum physics, and eastern mysticism to an undersdtanding of dreams. Some of his commnents are thought prevoking but the material needs to be more tightly organized. He keeps telling the reader "I will explain this more fully in a later chapter...". This made the 360 page read less enjoyable for me than it might have been had the material been presented in a less conversational format.
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Format: Paperback
Author Fred Alan Wolf offers readers some delightfully interesting possibilities about our connections to All That Is through dreams. Considered as "groundbreaking" by some, his work as presented here is the construction of a direct link between consciousness and the essence of reality.

Using developments in quantum physics, anthropology, biology and psychology, Wolf asserts that our dreams are the base upon which our consciousness is built. Citing examples in telepathy, synchronicity, lucid dreaming and dream interpretation from ancient cultures, he says our survival might well depend upon our nightly dreaming.

Chapter titles like, "We Dream to Create a Self", "The Dreamtime", and "The Physics of the Imaginal Realm" give you a hint at the mind-bending but clearly stated concepts this book holds. If he is right, the possibilities are endless.

Solid end notes, an extensive bibliography and a detailed index testify to the author's research and the accessibility of his presentation.
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