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Easy To Kill

4.1 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Pocket Books Inc.; First Edition edition (1971)
  • ASIN: B0043RP7NQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By David R. Eastwood on January 3, 2012
Format: Hardcover
EASY TO KILL (1939; originally published in Great Britain as MURDER IS EASY) is a very cleverly written fair-play puzzle story with a couple of bonuses: a fairly good love story and quite a bit of humor (most of it at the expense of a newspaper publisher, Lord Gordon Easterfield).

The detective in this book is neither Poirot nor Miss Marple. Instead, it is Luke Fitzwilliam, a retired colonial policeman who has returned to England and chances to converse on a train with a woman who reminds him of a favorite aunt. She informs him that she is reporting three murders to Scotland Yard and is hoping to prevent a fourth, that of a village doctor. Before she can do so, she is killed by a car, and a short time later the doctor she mentioned is killed. Fitzwilliam decides to investigate these five deaths.

There is a large array of plausible suspects, but readers with their eyes open ought to be able to solve the mystery before Luke Fitzwilliam does. (This novel has 24 chapters, and my own correct solution was arrived at in the middle of Chapter 19.)

I have rated this mystery four-stars (for a letter grade of "B+") and would have rated it higher if its concluding scenes had not depended so very heavily on a series of implausible and lucky coincidences. To say more than this would involve writing a "spoiler."
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Format: Hardcover
EASY TO KILL (1939; originally published in Great Britain as MURDER IS EASY) is a very cleverly written fair-play puzzle story with a couple of bonuses: a fairly good love story and quite a bit of humor (most of it at the expense of a newspaper publisher, Lord Gordon Easterfield).

The detective in this book is neither Poirot nor Miss Marple. Instead, it is Luke Fitzwilliam, a retired colonial policeman who has returned to England and chances to converse on a train with a woman who reminds him of a favorite aunt. She informs him that she is reporting three murders to Scotland Yard and is hoping to prevent a fourth, that of a village doctor. Before she can do so, she is killed by a car, and a short time later the doctor she mentioned is killed. Fitzwilliam decides to investigate these five deaths.

There is a large array of plausible suspects, but readers with their eyes open ought to be able to solve the mystery before Luke Fitzwilliam does. (This novel has 24 chapters, and my own correct solution was arrived at in the middle of Chapter 19.)

I have rated this mystery four-stars (for a letter grade of "B+") and would have rated it higher if its concluding scenes had not depended so very heavily on a series of implausible and lucky coincidences. To say more than this would involve writing a "spoiler."
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: Unknown Binding
EASY TO KILL (1939; originally published in Great Britain as MURDER IS EASY) is a very cleverly written fair-play puzzle story with a couple of bonuses: a fairly good love story and quite a bit of humor (most of it at the expense of a newspaper publisher, Lord Gordon Easterfield).

The detective in this book is neither Poirot nor Miss Marple. Instead, it is Luke Fitzwilliam, a retired colonial policeman who has returned to England and chances to converse on a train with a woman who reminds him of a favorite aunt. She informs him that she is reporting three murders to Scotland Yard and is hoping to prevent a fourth, that of a village doctor. Before she can do so, she is killed by a car, and a short time later the doctor she mentioned is killed. Fitzwilliam decides to investigate these five deaths.

There is a large array of plausible suspects, but readers with their eyes open ought to be able to solve the mystery before Luke Fitzwilliam does. (This novel has 24 chapters, and my own correct solution was arrived at in the middle of Chapter 19.)

I have rated this mystery four-stars (for a letter grade of "B+") and would have rated it higher if its concluding scenes had not depended so very heavily on a series of implausible and lucky coincidences. To say more than this would involve writing a "spoiler."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Unknown Binding
EASY TO KILL (1939; originally published in Great Britain as MURDER IS EASY) is a very cleverly written fair-play puzzle story with a couple of bonuses: a fairly good love story and quite a bit of humor (most of it at the expense of a newspaper publisher, Lord Gordon Easterfield).

The detective in this book is neither Poirot nor Miss Marple. Instead, it is Luke Fitzwilliam, a retired colonial policeman who has returned to England and chances to converse on a train with a woman who reminds him of a favorite aunt. She informs him that she is reporting three murders to Scotland Yard and is hoping to prevent a fourth, that of a village doctor. Before she can do so, she is killed by a car, and a short time later the doctor she mentioned is killed. Fitzwilliam decides to investigate these five deaths.

There is a large array of plausible suspects, but readers with their eyes open ought to be able to solve the mystery before Luke Fitzwilliam does. (This novel has 24 chapters, and my own correct solution was arrived at in the middle of Chapter 19.)

I have rated this mystery four-stars (for a letter grade of "B+") and would have rated it higher if its concluding scenes had not depended so very heavily on a series of implausible and lucky coincidences. To say more than this would involve writing a "spoiler."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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