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Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Hardcover has edge & corner wear. Pages show signs of wear & free of markings & highlighting. Mild water/liquid damage to pages. It has small stamp of previous owner on the first page & last page. Dust jacket maybe missing. Ships direct from Amazon!
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Edie Factory Girl Hardcover – November 1, 2006

3.4 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Nat Finkelstein was born in Brooklyn in 1933. He studied photography under Alexey Brodovitch, the legendary art director of Harper’s Bazaar, and worked as a photojournalist for the picture agency Black Star, reporting primarily on the political developments of the subculture of New York City. In 1964 he entered Andy Warhol’s factory, where he participated as “court photographer” within the group for over two years, capturing remarkable images with his camera. Finkelstein’s photography has been featured at the Whitney Museum and Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Palais des Arts and Centre Pompidou in Paris, and the Tate Modern in London, among other institutions. His books include Andy Warhol: The Factory Years 1964–1967 (powerHouse Books, 2000), The Andy Warhol Index (Black Star, 1967), and Girlfriends (Art Limited, 1990). A highly-acclaimed photojournalist and video artist, he currently divides his time between New York and Amsterdam.

David Dalton is the author of more than fifteen books of biography, fiction, history, and essays, including A Year in the Life of Andy Warhol (Phaidon, 2004) and The Rolling Stones: The First Twenty Years (Random House, 1984). A former Rolling Stone writer, he has also worked as the writer on the autobiographies of Meatloaf and Marianne Faithfull.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 160 pages
  • Publisher: VH1 Press (October 24, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1576873463
  • ISBN-13: 978-1576873465
  • Product Dimensions: 7.3 x 0.8 x 10.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #636,887 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
it's difficult to assess in a literary manner a book about edie sedgwick, because like her life, all works about her come through as fragmented/torn in pieces/collage-type depictions. it's only because edie's life really was like such. i had the book for a week before i started to read it and associate the text with images. i think david dalton did an admirable job of capturing the nature of edie's lightning flash through life, in and out of warhol and dylan, icons of the era, because it was like that, david was a witness, as were the commentators in the book, including myself. the book layout is helter-skelter, and so was edie's life. love it or leave it, the book is a faithful impression. it's not for criticism, it's to have for a midnight snack before being unable to sleep. all in all i can say if you want a real taste of edie sedgewick in the mid-sixties, this is it. billy name.
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Format: Hardcover
Each page has a gorgeous full color photo or photos of Edie, some of which I have never seen before but most of them I have in other books. A lot of the color photos also appear in Nat Finkelstein's The Factory Years which gives a greater photographic over view of "the factory". The pages are thick and glossy and technicolored like a Warhol painting and the font, utilizing many different font sizes in one paragraph, can be a bit challeging to read. The text is primarily a rehash of snippets from George Plimptons Edie: An American Biography which is far superior in content and photos although all of the photos are black and white. Over all a nicely done tribute to a fascinating and tragic person but more of a photo album/coffee table book than a biography. A definite must for any Edie fan.
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Format: Hardcover
This book is actually somewhat of a rip-off. Many of the quotes are from the book "Edie", which most people who would buy this book have probably already read. Though most of the pictures are candids, they are unlear, dull and don't give you any impression of Edie whatsoever. They are almost like bad pictures you might find in your basement that you meant to throw out. I was very dissapointed in this book. It's clearly another bad cash-in on Edie's posthumous fame.
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Format: Hardcover
I bought this book when it came out after seeing an ad for it on TV. The photos are cool and its a nice book to have laying around to page through. However, I am trying to get through the text of the book and its a hard read to get into, so far, it's either put me to sleep or I find I have to concentrate so hard on the text that it puts me back to reading my college text books. Its pretty grim and it uses alot of ambitious writing to get this point across. Its as if the author was trying to impress a professor or something when he put this together, as if he was trying TOO HARD. So, if you are looking for a light read, I really can't suggest this one, its over the top in my opinion. A coffee table book if you are into cool retro imagery or a huge Edie fan, try it, the photos are cool. I can see how Edie devotees are pissed off in what I have read so far, its more of a portrait of a monster than a tribute in my opinion, so if you are in this camp, just look at the pics, leave the text!
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Format: Hardcover
A friend got me this book as a gift. It is filled with very authentic and stylish photographs. The writing is frank and honest - and I'm sure for that fact alone, certain fans will be uncomfortable with this gritty portrait of Edie Sedgewick. Still, the images and text seem to capture a loss of innocence. The sense of psychadelic drug-enduced desperation is visceral - almost reminiscent of MIDNIGHT COWBOY. I have seen Nat Finkelstein's other books and would say that this is some of his best work. I'm not usually a fan of the coffee table genre, but this sizeable tome would do any Charles Eames bench proud.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Good, if not definitive, volume on shooting star of Warhol's Factory & the inspiration for Bob Dylan's, "Just Like A Woman." Well made book; had to cop "Edie: Girl On Fire," to get all the photos I wanted.
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Format: Hardcover
How anyone could produce a photo book on Edie Sedgwick and manage to make it this dull is beyond me. Graphically, it's an eyesore--the too-small font, which appears in a myriad of colors and sizes, is difficult to read at least half the time, and the photos--far from capturing Edie at her peak as the product description reads, are largely unflattering, showing a tired and pasty looking girl in rumpled babydoll nighties-- devoid of the energy that made her so enchanting-- A falling star is depicted, rather than a rising one.

Her "peak" had undoubtedly already passed, in '64-65, and photos of her from that time are vibrant, vivid and inspiring. Although great photos of Edie continued to be taken (most famously from the original "Ciao! Manhattan" shoot), by '66-'67, the damage she was doing to herself was beginning to show.

In her best photos, she is alive, awake, alert and uniquely responsive to those around her. These photos, although some are undoubtedly good, are largely culled from only a few sessions, many showing her in a twilight haze that quite frankly is depressing, seldom looking at anyone, unfocused, daydreaming into space or looking down, not interacting with, but removed from her environment, forever applying makeup and seemingly lost in her own world. Lost she may have been, but she left a better photographic legacy than this. The Edie: Girl on Fire book comes considerably closer to catching some of her lightning in a bottle, is a better read, and infinitely more of a feel-good affair.
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