Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 7 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Education: Free & Compuls... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by SuperBookDeals-
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: No guarantee on products that contain supplements and some products may include highlighting and writing.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Education: Free & Compulsory Paperback – August 15, 1999

4.3 out of 5 stars 21 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, August 15, 1999
$5.95
$5.85 $3.95
$5.95 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 7 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Education: Free & Compulsory
  • +
  • Anatomy of the State
  • +
  • The Law
Total price: $23.65
Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 58 pages
  • Publisher: Ludwig von Mises Institute (August 15, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0945466226
  • ISBN-13: 978-1933550954
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 5.8 x 0.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #958,956 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Murray Rothbard published this small book in two installments in The Individualist some years ago. In it Rothbard sets forth his theory of education and how education relates to the state.
Not surprisingly, Rothbard starts with a discussion of human nature and the basic fact of human inequality. Since people differ in abilities and interests, there will be no one kind of education that is appropriate for all children. Some children will benefit from an education that prepares them for work relatively early in life, others for a career in the professions. A system of voluntary education, where parents choose what is best for their children, is the most efficient system and also the most consistent with individual freedom.
However, government is the great equalizer and centralizer. Rather than accept human inequality, it is intent on creating a "one size fits all" approach to education. As Rothbard shows through an analysis of educational reforms in the US and the world, governments began to create taxpayer funded, compulsory schools in order to indoctrinate children into the ideology of the state. As the elites became more secularized in the 1800s, government run schools were established to destroy the influence of religion and the church.
I can't agree with everything Rothbard says. There are a few unsupported statements (such as his attacks on Protestantism) and gaps in logic, but as usual Rothbard is provocative.
Comment 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very short book, only 55 pages but well worth it. I wasn't as interested in the authors political commentary, he's a libertarian, although education policy is indeed quite political. John Taylor Gatto is another and I think more passionate and detailed critic of the educational system and some of what they write overlaps. What I gained most from this book is the idea of the collective/the state against the uniqueness and full development of the individual. That's an important theme, Rothbard kept hammering on the term equality which put me off a bit, but when he talks of uniformity/standardization versus the needs of the individual, he has my attention. I work in higher education, have obtained a teacher's license and so have spent a lot of my life around the educational establishment and have to agree with Rothbard. Most of the phoney debate about education doesn't even acknowledge the glaringly obvious issue that a great majority of students don't want to be there, aren't going to learn the curriculum and basically are imprisoned for well over a decade. The ways schools operate have very little to do with effective teaching or learning, you can't have a one-size-fits all when it comes to education, don't care how economically efficient it is, doesn't work. I'm starting to see how schools, churches and prisons are strikingly similar in trying to instill obedience and submission as primary objectives, learning is secondary. What is scary is that the educational system no longer seems to educate but rather to process students through the pipeline and it's especially evident here in Texas with the surrender of individual thought and expression to the group or to the state, students are simply meat for the grinder.Read more ›
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
In 55 pages the author clearly explains what ills our educational system. Written in 1971 it clearly predicts what has happened to education in our country and accurately predicts the academic performance that it will produce, as well as the mentality to support whatever politician is in power.

Right off the bat he clearly shows why "equality" in education is a farce and how teaching to the lowest makes sure we, as a nation, will, in time, fail - which we are doing very well at.

The odd notion that a government should have the right to form the minds of its citizens is foundational to dictatorships and a democracy run by an oligarch. The idea that the government should even have any control over a private school is tyranny!

The author then goes on to show how it was religious leaders who first felt it was their right to take away the education of children from the parents. It is interesting to see what damage religious leaders have done to the family and to society in the name of imposing their values upon those who do not share those values.

Children were taken away from their parents to be "educated" at gunpoint. Later it was professional educators, trade unions and employers that forced education upon the children. Now we see how with years of "educational reform" the budget for adults keeps going up, using taxpayer money, but results keep going down.

It is sooo clear that the purpose of schools is to teach children to obey those set above them and support the existing government rather than oppose it!

No Child Let Ahead and the Race to the Bottom both are clearly an attempt by government to control children on a national scale molding them to all think alike.
Read more ›
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Few things can make me feel as uncomfortable as the unsavory expression of ideas I basically agree with. I bought this book because I expected a good argument for and information to support the ideas I instinctively believe in and support. Unfortunately this book is more of an affirmation than an argument; more of a manifesto than an essay; propaganda rather than analysis.
The arguments are indisputable, but not particularly well presented.
I've always been a strong opponent of compulsory public education but the way the arguments are presented in this book make me twitch. My support for the ideas of non-compulsory non-public education does not stem from the fact that I do not want my children to mix with the `moronic' and `substandard' ones.
The only information that was news to me was the Lutheran-Calvinist influence in the birth of public education.
I think my misgivings can be understood considering the level of ignorance displayed in some of the passages. Mistaking Sade for Rousseau is absolutely inexcusable. I have not read "Emile" myself, but at least I know about it; I know what it is about and if I was to write about education, I would make an effort to read it. Making a vague reference to the wrong author does not inspire confidence in other references presented by Mr. Rothbard.
Should you read this book? Since it is very short, I would say why not? If you are interested in the subject this will introduce you to the basic libertarian ideas concerning it. Just do not expect high quality arguments.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Education: Free & Compulsory
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Education: Free & Compulsory