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The Edukators

3.9 out of 5 stars 61 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

jan, peter e jule vivono la loro ribellione giovanile e vorrebbero cambiare il mondo. jan e peter di notte diventano gli "edukators", propagatori di una filosofia non violenta che mette in guardia i ricchi dal fatto che gli anni della vacche grasse sono finiti.

Product Details

  • Actors: daniel bruhl, julia jentsch
  • Directors: hans weingartner
  • Format: PAL
  • Language: Italian (Dolby Digital 5.0), English (Dolby Digital 5.0)
  • Subtitles: Italian
  • Region: Region 2 (Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    G
    General Audience
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (61 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0041KX7FU
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #427,534 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
The Edukators is a very interesting German film, directed by Hans Weingartner, about three young radicals whose ideals are put to the test. We at first observe them taking part in fairly commonplace demonstrations against global trade. These are people, however, who are determined to take things beyond the level of protest. Jan and Peter are friends who break into the homes of affluent people and, instead of stealing anything, simply rearrange the furniture and other items. They leave a calling card with the message, "Your days of plenty are numbered," and sign it "The Edukators." The premise is in itself fascinating and leads to some humorous scenes as well as provoking thought. The humor comes from seeing the absurd relocation of objects, such as putting a stereo in the refrigerator. This is, rather than conventional vandalism, a kind of performance art, meant to create uneasiness and self-examination on the part of the victims.

While Peter is out of town, his girlfriend Jule and Jan spend time together and become attracted to each other. After Jan introduces Jule to the Edukators' tactics, Jule convinces him to help her "visit" the home of a businessman to whom she owes a large sum of money following a car accident. The man catches them and they end up kidnapping him, bringing Peter into the action. The rest of the film follows the three friends as they decide what to do with their victim and debate politics with him. Some of these discussions are interesting, though they inevitably follow a predictable course ("you are a parasite living off the poor" vs. "I have a right to what I earned," to paraphrase). The businessman, however, moves from arguing with his captors to sympathizing with them, explaining that he was once a radical himself.
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On the back of the DVD cover it says that it was one of the funniest movies that person had seen all year. That I would disagree with, because I found it anything but funny. However it is a great movie. It really captures this feeling of powerlessness and of hopelessness that one finds in German youth and young adults. Although I am sure the same goes for Americans. All three main characters work, because they have to, but aren't exactly sure where it will ever get them. They start breaking into houses-huge, rich villas-, not to steal anything, but to rearrange furniture and take away that feeling of security from the rich. The feeling of security is something they haven't experienced yet in their adult lives. Jule owes a lot of money to a filthy rich guy, because she hit his mercedes and was uninsured. All she works for, is to pay him back. On her insistance they break into his house and end up getting caught by him. In a rush moment they abduct him and go to this hut in the mountains. There begins a conversation between the three and the captured. He, although now wealthy, claims to have been quite active in the 60s and 70s and that he understands what's going on him them. It becames an interesting dialogue, but it's not idealized, because Jule's and Peter's position is brought into question as well, because violence doesn't solve anything. The movie never really gives an answer to what the solution for the future is, but it discribes this present state of mind perfectly and states that something has to change, better sooner than later. All three actors do an terrific job.
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Jan and Peter are two best friends who try to change the world by screwing with the minds of the wealthy. When the rich go on vacation, these two boys break into their homes and move stuff around. However, when Peter's girlfriend gets into the act for revenge, everythings goes horribly wrong and friendships begin to crack. Even though there is obviously some deeper meaning to this film, it is still interesting enough to keep viewers engaged. The acting is excellent, especially with Daniel Bruehl from 'Good-bye, Lenin!' as Jan. A must-see for everyone, whether you speak German or not.
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Format: DVD
Since I entered this film with no expectations, The Edukators hit me like a combination of a spiked punch and a sucker punch - it left me surprisingly shaken yet somehow also refreshingly, intoxicatingly awakened.

The Edukators takes us on a journey with three would-be revolutionaries: Jan, a passionate iconoclast who rails against the commodification of dissent ("What used to be revolutionary, you can buy in stores today. Che Guevara t-shirts and anarchy stickers."); Jule (played by Julia Jentsch, the dazzling young actress from "Sophie Scholl"), a directionless and searching soul who, as Jan says, goes to so many protests against exploitation and oppression but is still oppressed and exploited herself; and Peter, an somewhat naïve idealist who early on tells Jule to "always go for the brightest colors" when choosing an ice cream flavor.

Apparently, writer/director Hans Weingartner took these latter words to heart in the making of this movie; it's been ages since I've seen such vivid, vibrant hues in a film - from the chaotic neon of the boisterous Berlin cityscape to the pastoral calm of the countryside, this movie is awash in breathtaking color.

The same could also be said about its characters - though they may start of as seemingly one-dimensional archetypes, many shades of light and dark emerge from each well-acted portrait. And when complications arise in the young revolutionaries' activities (as they always do, when one puts one's dreams into action), they end up on opposite sides of a standoff in which some remarkable similarities are discovered.

The Edukators deftly mixes politics of the mind with politics of the heart and whips it all into a heady and suspenseful stew.
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