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Einstein Plus Two 1987 edition Edition

3.8 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0911762396
ISBN-10: 0911762396
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 212 pages
  • Publisher: Golem Press; 1987 edition edition (August 1987)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0911762396
  • ISBN-13: 978-0911762396
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,567,174 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on August 23, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Although I agree with physicist Edward Teller that the late Dr. Beckmann was wrong about special relativity, this book outlines a mathematically consistent theory of electrodynamics and gravity designed to rescue Newton's classic assumptions of absolute space and time from what he calls the "acrobatics" of relativity. Engrossing for readers of a technical bent (Astronomy, Popular Mechanics, Electronics, etc.) who want to be challenged. Those of you who would rather swill beer and read Esquire need not apply. This book is written with poise, humility, and humor (like the much loved History of Pi), virtues not found among the more paranoid cranks decrying Einstein.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
1. Petr Beckmann obviously has problems with Albert Einstein, which makes the book difficult to read. If you can get past this, however, there is much to learn.
2. Beckmann, whose is an immigrant to the USA, thinks that we understand English -- no matter how it is written. He tends to write long sentences.
3. Beckmann thinks we are all physicists and does show the derivation for several formulas he uses. He falls back on his professorship, saying (in effect) look them up for yourself.
4. In attacking Einstein's relativity, Beckmann sees no need to narrow his attack. Thus, he attacks many different theories. I am sure only a historian has heard of most of them.
5. Beckmann does not seem to differentiate (sufficiently) between Special Relativity and General Relativity. They are often both bunched together under Einstein's Relativity. But there is a real difference between the two.
6. I grew up on Einstein, yet I think that Beckmann is mostly correct. For example, in Special Relativity, you will note that light moves at c relative to everything. I can understand the microcosm in which that statement is true. But it has been misapplied often. Light traveling across the Universe -- from this star to that star -- does not necessarily travel at c relative to Earth. Read the book to understand.
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Format: Hardcover
This book uses Maxwell's Equations and classical mechanics to derive Planck's Constant and the Schrödinger Equation. Beckmann does an excellent job of debunking Einstein's relativity theories by showing their conceptual flaws in logic. Beckmann's central theory is that the speed of light is constant with respect to the source of the dominant gravitational field, not the observer. This view is supported by all known experimental evidence, e.g., the earth-centered inertial (ECI) reference frame and GPS.

Later critique has discovered a flaw in the second half of this text regarding Beckmann's definition for aberration. Nevertheless, Beckmann's writing style is very witty and entertaining.
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