Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Elementary Differential Equations 9th Edition

3.3 out of 5 stars 48 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0470039403
ISBN-10: 047003940X
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Trade in your item
Get a $6.18
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Rent On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$28.45 - $28.46 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$30.91 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
12 New from $51.55 90 Used from $15.78

There is a newer edition of this item:

Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

William E. Boyce received his B.A. degree in Mathematics from Rhodes College, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Mathematics from Carnegie-Mellon University. He is a member of the American Mathematical Society, the Mathematical Association of America, and the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. He is currently the Edward P. Hamilton Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Science Education (Department of Mathematical Sciences) at Rensselaer. He is the author of numerous technical papers in boundary value problems and random differential equations and their applications. He is the author of several textbooks including two differential equations texts, and is the coauthor (with M.H. Holmes, J.G. Ecker, andW.L. Siegmann) of a text on using Maple to explore Calculus. He is also coauthor (with R.L. Borrelli and C.S. Coleman) of Differential Equations LaboratoryWorkbook (Wiley 1992), which received the EDUCOMBest Mathematics Curricular InnovationAward in 1993. Professor Boyce was a member of the NSF-sponsored CODEE (Consortium for Ordinary Differential Equations Experiments) that led to the widely-acclaimed ODE Architect. He has also been active in curriculum innovation and reform. Among other things, he was the initiator of the "Computers in Calculus" project at Rensselaer, partially supported by the NSF. In 1991 he received the William H.Wiley Distinguished FacultyAward given by Rensselaer. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 656 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley; 9 edition (October 27, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 047003940X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0470039403
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 1.1 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (48 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #38,679 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This book sucks. Yeah, I'm being really blunt here, but this is probably the second most useless math textbook I've ever used (the first being "A Friendly Introduction to Number theory"). Now, my beef is primarily with the text itself (the problems, while mostly dull, are useful for learning and applying the techniques -- so they serve their purpose well), since the explanations are hard to follow, written with gratuitously dense language, and are very murky and unclear.

For example, this book makes understanding the techniques of variation of parameters and undetermined coefficients ridiculously painful to understand. And don't even get me started on the chapter on Laplace transforms -- I could barely understand a single thing there!

However, it's not all bad. *most* of the earlier chapters' contents are pretty good. Still, there are some murky bits and random theoretical topics addressed only half-heartedly, but for the most part, they're okay.

Also, as I said before, the problems in this book aren't bad! My professor usually assigned suggested problems from the text and doing them really helped me memorize the techniques that I learned from Paul's Online Notes...erm, I mean from the chapter!

So yeah, it's an average, run of the mill, hard-to-understand textbook. If you're required to use it for a class, make sure you pay attention and not skip class thinking that you can learn from the book! If you're looking for a book for self study...well, I guess you can use it for the problems, but for the actual material, don't bother with it, just use Paul's Online Notes or ask for help on math forums or something.
Comment 22 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
The book is filled with abstract theory little of which makes sense to an ODE introductory student. The examples given in the book are rarely similar to the ones found in the problem set. I am currently taking ODE and I feel like I spend more time learning from the internet than from the book. The author takes the simplest topic and makes it sound like neuroscience. If you can avoid buying this book, then do so at all costs. If not, just get the old version for a low price( for the problem sets) and try learning the material from youtube and google.
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
This is a review of chapters 2, 3, and 6, which form a typical one-quarter first course in ODE's. Having taught from this book, I'm not a fan. My complaints:

1. The large-scale organization of ideas is not clear to the reader. A major cause is that it's written in a "discussion" format, where key definitions and ideas are embedded in walls of text. In an elementary book like this, there's only a few "ideas" per section, but in this book those ideas are not clear and are not easily found. In particular they're almost never in the first few paragraphs of a section.

For example, in the reduction of order section, the only real idea is "let's try the change of variables y=u y_1; awesome!--it works in certain cases like repeated roots and generally amplifies up from one solution to more!". This high-level organization is not at all clear from the text. The rather bizarre reduction of order explanation instead begins in the last page of the section and carries out the computations entirely abstractly before cutting off just before the final step (which produces an admittedly horrific formula, but if you did all the abstract lead-up work, why stop before you're done?). It ends by doing a concrete example, but in all this discussion it never makes the reduction of order algorithm concrete or summarizes the actual method. You won't find a definition of "reduction of order" in this text. In general it could take a hint from Wikipedia's organization and success.

2. It's boring and often long-winded. It needs a viscous editor to make the prose crisp and cut maybe a quarter of the text.

One random example: "Theorem 3.2.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By JBitt on January 23, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
My professor did not speak English very well; plus I found it hard to concentrate while he scribbled equations on the dry erase board. So when it came time to do the homework and study for exams, this book was about all I had. There are definitely improvements that could be made (more complex examples, better formatting), but the material is well explained and the examples are fairly numerous. With enough determination, you can get through Diff EQ with just this book.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The text in this book is almost incomprehensible at times. You really learn the most from the given examples, and the more decent solutions in the solutions manual (which i HIGHLY recommend for this course). There are some sections that are just much too difficult to understand due to the content itself. (like chapter 5 section 3). Its difficult for me to put all of the blame on the author's because the subject is very difficult to teach regardless. There are parts of the book where reading becomes a waste of time due to the language used by the author. There is not much of an attempt to "dumb down" the writing, or atleast simplify concepts enough for students to grasp onto. There are paragraphs of high level mathematical jargin that would be over the head of most students, but overall, this book can and will get you through the course. My professor was as bad as this book and i made out with an A. I suggest doing as many problems as you can make time for because there are a lot of different kinds of problems in this course, and it can be difficult to keep the procedures straight for each kind...A good thing about this book is that the final solution for every single problem is provided in the back, so you can always confirm whether your solution is correct or not...if it isnt, consult the solutions manual. If you did well in calc 2, this is the course for you...its just a lot of mechanical, plug and chug, pure math.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews