Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Elephant's Memory

4.3 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Audio CD, May 11, 2004
$115.58

Stream Millions of Songs FREE with Amazon Prime
Get Started with Amazon Prime Stream millions of songs anytime, anywhere, included with an Amazon Prime membership. Get started

Editorial Reviews

That this band’s founders (saxophonist Stan Bronstein and drummer/vocalist Rick Frank) met on the strip joint circuit is too perfect, for if one thing was consistent about Elephant’s Memory’s career through numerous line-up and label changes, it was their flair for the outrageous, culminating in their backing of John Lennon on 'Some Time in New York City' and Yoko on 'Approximately Infinite Universe'. This, however, is their first record, made in 1969 when they were gaining a reputation for wildly theatrical, Zappa-esque stage shows; a unique blend of psychedelia, wistful balladery, jazz and hard rock, this album also landed two songs on the 'Midnight Cowboy' soundtrack, 'Old Man Willow' and 'Jungle Gym at the Zoo'. In short, a very late ’60s New York experience awaits you on this 'Collectors’ Choice Music' exclusive! Includes 'Band of Love; Brief Encounter; Crossroads of the Stepping Stones; Don’t Put Me on Trial No More; Hot Dog Man; Jungle Gym at the Zoo; R.I! .P.; Super Heep; Takin’ a Walk', and 'Yogurt Song'.
  • Sample this album Artist (Sample)
1
30
2:51
Play in Library $1.29
 
2
30
2:55
Play in Library $1.29
 
3
30
2:12
Play in Library $1.29
 
4
30
5:30
Play in Library $1.29
 
5
30
1:41
Play in Library $1.29
 
6
30
4:10
Play in Library $1.29
 
7
30
3:48
Play in Library $1.29
 
8
30
3:32
Play in Library $1.29
 
9
30
7:05
Play in Library $1.29
 
10
30
2:55
Play in Library $1.29
 
11
30
4:37
Play in Library $1.29
 

Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 11, 2004)
  • Label: Collector's Choice
  • ASIN: B0001XAPEW
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,721,275 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Amazon's Elephant's Memory Store

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Michael Roy on August 19, 2005
Format: Audio CD
This album is stange in a way. Its very well made. Nice harmonies on the vocals. All the instruments sound great together. The saxophone also fits well within the tracks. I also have there 2nd album "Elephants Memory" on Apple Records produced by John Lennon & Yoko Ono. Sadly that one is not avalible on CD yet. Hopefully soon enought. If You Like Beatles Related Stuff I strongly recommend this album. Great Addition to any collection.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
That score, along with John Barry's original themes and Nilsson's "Everybody's Talkin'", includes the BEST tunes on this early Elephants Memory Buddah record, "Old Man Willow" and "Jungle Gym at the Zoo."

The rest is uneventful. Not bad, just a producer in search of a band's sound.
Comment 7 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Vinyl
Songs: SIDE 1...Liberation Special, Baddest of the Mean, Cryin Blacksheep Blues, Chuck'n Bo...SIDE 2...Gypsy Wolf, Madness, Life, Wind Ridge, Power Boogie, Local Plastic Ono Band
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
No less royality than John Lennon picked this band as his backup, and the answer why is easy. Elephant's Memory were a rockin' band with a great brass section.

But even when they rocked, like on the opening track here, they rocked well. All kinds of percussion, great singing, and playing that is both rock solid and elastic. Listen to "Jungle Gym" in the Zoo.' The beastly sexual track-- perfectly expressing how previously unspoken impulses were roaring in 1969-rocks as heavy as any non-protometel band could. But listen to how they use a tuba here, and how the orgy takes place over a rubbery blues funk. Even the opening scale is inventive.

But these guys could jazz it--no they were not Coltrane, but RIP and Old Man Willow are the kind of smokey, counter-culture jazz that you would hear in Village Coffee houses. There is a reason this music wound up in Midnight Cowboy. (And, wouldn't RIP be great for a TV Marlboro add, which you could still do in 1969.

Even fun little songs like "Yogurt" hold up because of a rock treatment, not a novalty one.

Get this.;
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD
Elephant's Memory is a difficult group to pin down. With shifting lineups (Carly Simon actually once sang for them!) and a constantly evolving sound, even the guy who wrote the liner notes for this CD can't quite seem to keep it all straight. (Ask yourself who the lead female voice is on this album. Though nothing on this CD actually indicates it, the singer must be Martha Velez.)

One is tempted to say that Elephant's Memory was a product of the 60s and leave it at that. A combination of acid rock and jazz, this 1969 first album from the group might remind you a bit of Jefferson Airplane with a Big Band/Jazz twist.

The album is a little too inconsistent to be called a classic, but it has enough good tracks and showed enough promise to warrant the 4 stars I give it. "Band of Love" is probably the best of the bunch here, with a feel good chorus where it sounds like the entire band joins in to sing along. "Yogurt Song" and "Hot Dog Man" show the group was not above having a little fun, while "Don't Put Me on Trial No More" and "Takin' a Walk" show signs of the harder direction the group would soon take.

Elephant's Memory grabbed their 15 minutes of fame in 1972 when John Lennon discovered the group and used them as the backing band for his album "Sometime in New York City." What could have been a star turning break for the group ended in disappointment as the album became Lennon's biggest mistake. Bad reviews and bad sales made Lennon quickly forget about Elephant's Memory.

Still, the Lennon period lead to a few other notable releases.
Read more ›
1 Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Forums



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?