Industrial Deals Beauty MagazinestoInspire STEM nav_sap_plcc_ascpsc PCB for Musical Instruments Starting at $39.99 Grocery Handmade Wedding Rustic Decor Home Gift Guide Off to College Home Gift Guide Book House Cleaning _baw _baw _baw  Introducing Echo Show Limited-time offer: All-New Fire 7 Kids Edition, starting at $79.99 Kindle Oasis AutoRip in CDs & Vinyl Water Sports STEMClubToys17_gno

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

The Emergence of Everything: How the World Became Complex and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more

The Emergence of Everything: How the World Became Complex
 
 



or
Sign in to turn on 1-Click ordering
More Buying Choices
allnewbooks Add to Cart
$13.41 + $3.99 shipping
insight57 Add to Cart
$19.00  & FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Have one to sell? Sell yours here
Start reading The Emergence of Everything: How the World Became Complex on your Kindle in under a minute.

Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App.

The Emergence of Everything: How the World Became Complex [Paperback]

Harold J. Morowitz
3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (31 customer reviews)

List Price: $19.99
Price: $18.98 & FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
You Save: $1.01 (5%)
o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Want it Friday, Aug. 18? Details
click to open popover
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student

Add your library to your summer adventure
Shop Kindle books to add the perfect companion to your summer fun. See more

Book Description

April 8, 2004 0195173317 978-0195173314
When the whole is greater than the sum of the parts--indeed, so great that the sum far transcends the parts and represents something utterly new and different--we call that phenomenon emergence. When the chemicals diffusing in the primordial waters came together to form the first living cell, that was emergence. When the activities of the neurons in the brain result in mind, that too is emergence.
In The Emergence of Everything, one of the leading scientists involved in the study of complexity, Harold J. Morowitz, takes us on a sweeping tour of the universe, a tour with 28 stops, each one highlighting a particularly important moment of emergence. For instance, Morowitz illuminates the emergence of the stars, the birth of the elements and of the periodic table, and the appearance of solar systems and planets. We look at the emergence of living cells, animals, vertebrates, reptiles, and mammals, leading to the great apes and the appearance of humanity. He also examines tool making, the evolution of language, the invention of agriculture and technology, and the birth of cities. And as he offers these insights into the evolutionary unfolding of our universe, our solar system, and life itself, Morowitz also seeks out the nature of God in the emergent universe, the God posited by Spinoza, Bruno, and Einstein, a God Morowitz argues we can know through a study of the laws of nature.
Written by one of our wisest scientists, The Emergence of Everything offers a fascinating new way to look at the universe and the natural world, and it makes an important contribution to the dialogue between science and religion.

Frequently bought together

  • The Emergence of Everything: How the World Became Complex
  • +
  • Energy Flow in Biology
Total price: $36.98
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

From Scientific American

"We are clearly at the beginning of viewing science from the new perspective of emergence," Morowitz writes. "I believe that it will provide insights into the evolutionary unfolding of our universe, our solar system, our biota, and our humanity." Emergence is the opposite of reductionism. "In the domain of emergence, the assumption is made that both actual systems as well as models operate by selection from the immense space and variability of the world of the possible, and in carrying out this selection, new and unanticipated properties emerge." Morowitz, professor of biology and natural philosophy at George Mason University, provides 28 examples of emergence, from the primordium through the appearance of hominids to their progression to philosophy and the spiritual. His argument is closely reasoned and rich in scientific and philosophical background.

Editors of Scientific American --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review


"Morowitz claims that emergence supplies us with a new foundation for religion-one that enables the natural sciences to supply a foundation for spiritual realities." -- C.P. Goodman, The Polyani Society Periodical


"Closely reasoned and rich in scientific and philosophical background."--Scientific American


"This is a brilliant book. Morowitz has provided the first state-of-the-art overview of the theory of emergence across the scientific disciplines. Neither too detailed nor too abstract, his 28 stages of emergence trace the history of the universe from the Big Bang through the appearance of culture, philosophy and spirituality. No other work has laid out the core case for emergence--and hence against the ultimacy of reductionism--across the whole spectrum of science. This introduction to emergence theory should guide philosophers of science and anthropologists, theologians and metaphysicians, as they reflect on the nature of Homo sapiens and our place in the cosmos."--Philip Clayton, Harvard University



Product details


Customer reviews

Top customer reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars June 6, 2016
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Excellent; understandable by a retired mechanical engineer with no previous knowledge of topics such as biochemistry.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A good, broad start into Emergence. February 15, 2009
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
An informative read--fairly clear for the layperson (myself), with some jargon and technical spots.
Successful in presenting the basic principle of 'emergence', but most of the book is spent in a long-winded struggle to further flesh out emergence and provide examples. . . . as a result I felt that I had to learn quite a bit of biology and geological history just so that they could be drawn into basic examples of emergence. (Not necessarily a bad thing, but a lot of time was spent on the outskirts just to support the theme). I know that the concept (and field) of 'emergence' is new, but I expected to learn more on the dynamics, not just see exemplification. There are a few broad assumptions and much of the author's personal bias can be seen. However, (to me) the author was redeemed when they turned away from the empirical science aspects to cite philosophers (such as Kant) and draw up major points about emergence as a bridge between worldviews of science and religion. This brings surprising balance and broadens the topic, making it more of an insightful work rather than a murky scientific textbook. This exemplifies the broadness of emergence, rather than trapping it in empirical views.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
4.0 out of 5 stars good book September 5, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
Excellent review about the theory of emergence. I do not agree with the authors conclusion on how religion or a supreme being plays a roll in such emergence. But the book is insightful.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
5.0 out of 5 stars Morowitz is a Treasure January 21, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
An incredibly important book. Harold Morowitz is a treasure. He literally spans all of human knowledge in one magnificent book.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars April 19, 2015
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
Good product, as expected.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
6 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Reduction and Construction are Complementary July 28, 2004
Format:Hardcover|Verified Purchase
The reviewers angrily decrying Dr. Morowitz's non-scientific perspective ignore his reductionist credentials. He is a biophysicist. He clearly understands reductionism including its limitations. I don't believe he advocates the replacement of reduction by construction (In my opinion, the methodology for studying emergence). Dr. Anderson at Princeton said it best; we must start with reduction. He also says that, "More is different." We all know in our hearts that more is definitely different. Science is now mature enough to tackle that age old observation. In the process, science will evolve. With any change, resistance almost always seems to emerge. Truth will win out in the end. This book is the tip of the iceberg in what is probably a watershed moment in the story of science.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars What an overwrought waste of time December 5, 2014
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
What an overwrought waste of time.

I was excited to read this book because I love the concept of emergence and emergent properties. I was interested in discovering some insight into the emergence of consciousness and how it might relate this to theoretical emergence of spirit and even deity. Unfortunately, Morowitz either doesn't fully understand what he's writing about, or he's extremely naïve as to how to supplement intriguing ideas with actual intelligent explanations.

Though technically proficient in writing about emergences throughout the timeline of the universe (with a few embarrassingly inadequate explanations and guesses thrown in), he misses what makes this topic interesting. He brushes past emergence as merely a bridge from one scientific/astronomical/biological topic to the next.

This book was a relatively concise refresher on topics stellar and planetary formation as well as evolution, it does nothing to add to the study of emergence, and in my opinion does it an injustice with his attempt to reconcile his God of Spinoza and Teilhard with the scientific understandings of emergent properties.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars August 4, 2014
Format:Paperback|Verified Purchase
I WANT TO SEE THE TABLE CONTENTS OF AMAZON BOOKS!!!
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Report abuse
Most recent customer reviews
1.0 out of 5 stars Human Search for Meaning In Inappropriate Phenomena!
Really disappointed with this book. Thought I was purchasing a current book on the SCIENCE of complexity, novelty and how they relate to, and bring about emergent properties or... Read more
Published 1 month ago by John C. Schlitt
3.0 out of 5 stars Three Stars
Very cool.
Published on April 29, 2015 by Robert
1.0 out of 5 stars Would have burned this book if I didn't have to ...
Would have burned this book if I didn't have to use it again for school...

It does explore chaos theory well...but it is PAINFUL
Published on March 17, 2015 by Haley Yarbrough
4.0 out of 5 stars Nibbling at the tree of knowledge
This book attempts to unravel the mind of god as Morowitz feels that "knowing the mind of god is our task as humans, our vocation". Read more
Published on May 26, 2013 by Amazon Customer
5.0 out of 5 stars Book: The Emergence of Everything, by Morowitz
Arrived promptly and in perfect condition. This book is now part of a library specializing in large, complex self-organizing systems; genetic computation; emergence; and dynamical... Read more
Published on March 26, 2013 by CWG
1.0 out of 5 stars Emergence is a weasel word
I have always thought that the word emergence, as used to "explain" novel characters in the physical, especially the biological world, was meaningless. Read more
Published on May 29, 2011 by Harry Eagar
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant.
In a daring attempt to catalogue each and every emergence as a platform for scientific and religious dialogue, Morowitz gives us The Emergence of Everything as food for thought on... Read more
Published on March 11, 2010 by Patricia L. Murphy
Search customer reviews

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

Pages with related products. See and discover other items: systems biology, complex system of systems, physics and metaphysics

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Emergence of Everything: How the World Became Complex
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Emergence of Everything: How the World Became Complex


Look for similar items by category