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Comment: Very clean pages, binding tight, hard cover nice with mild wear. Dust jacket nice with mild wear. In very good condition.
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The Emerging Midwest: Upland Southerners and the Political Culture of the Old Northwest, 1787-1861 (Midwestern History and Culture) Hardcover – February 22, 1996

5.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"... agile, ambitious, and complex ..." - The Journal of Southern History "Etcheson adds a fresh dimension to the history of the Old Northwest by examining the way in which Upland Southerners' regional heritage affected the evolution of political culture in Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois." - Choice " ... not only a political account, but also a cultural survey. The book is clearly written, free of jargon, and makes excellent use of both primary and secondary sources... an outstanding interpretation of the motives and acts of a significant portion of the population of a significant portion of the country." - Lucy Jayne Kamau, H-Net H-WEST Digest "Impressively researched, intelligently organized, and clearly written... [this volume] is the first in-depth study of political culture in the Old Northwest in the early nineteenth century, and it underlines the significance of persistent regional identities in the U.S." - Andrew R. L. Cayton "...Well researched and is written in a clear, engaging style...an excellent study of the origins and infulence of regional identity. It should gain a wide readership among students of antebellum America." - The North Carolina Historical Review "... an impressive and exhaustive job of research in primary materials, including letters, editorials, petitions, speeches, diaries, and memoirs. She pieces together these highly subjective accounts into an objective explanation of midwesterners' views." - Indiana Magazine of History "In this well-written and carefully researched volume, Nicole Etcheson develops the role of Upland Southerners in the Ohio valley as they helped forge the political culture and public stance of that part of the Old Northwest." - Michigan Historical Review "... an outstanding contribution to our understanding of the political and cultural development of the the Old Northwest. This volume should be consulted by all who are interested in the region's history." - Wisconsin Magazine of History "... a thought-provoking volume that should be read by all scholars who study the development of the Midwest." - Illinois Historical Journal

From the Back Cover

Frequently mis-characterized as a vast homogeneous region, the territory from earliest European settlement has seen diverse migrant groups. The process of defining the Midwest began when Northern and Southern migrants began to identify themselves as Westerners. Shared identities as citizens of the new republic, as members of political parties, and as Westerners forged a Midwestern identity that Southern settlers shared with Yankees, Pennsylvanians, and others descending on the future states of Indiana, Ohio, and Illinois. The Civil War shook this new regional identity but did not destroy it. Focusing on Upland Southerners (from Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, Kentucky, and Tennessee), Nicole Etcheson examines the tensions between a developing Midwestern identity and residual regional loyalty to the South. This dynamic process mirrored the nation-building and national disintegration experienced in the U.S. between the Revolution and the Civil War. The story of these Upland Southerners is also unique, shedding light on the meaning of the South for those who left it, on the new republic's ability to overcome sectional loyalties, and on the creation of a new region, the Midwest.
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Product Details

  • Series: Midwestern History and Culture
  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press (February 22, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0253329949
  • ISBN-13: 978-0253329943
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 0.9 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,353,320 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Fascinating.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A must read but for, perhaps, a rather limited audience. Highly recommended for genealogists and family historians whose ancestors made the trek from Tennessee and/or Kentucky in the first three or four decades of the 1800s to the southern sections of Illinois and Indiana. Ms Etcheson's writing is accessible for the non-historian but is scholarly at the same time. This book gives great insight into why there was such an exodus of small, subsistence farmers away from the slave owning states to what was viewed at the time as the great Northwest.
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