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Emma by [Austen, Jane]
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Emma Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 520 customer reviews

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Length: 459 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Details

  • File Size: 1093 KB
  • Print Length: 459 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 1523377208
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: May 16, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0083Z3O8Y
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #971 Free in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Free in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is true to Jane Austen: elegant writing, engaging and lovable characters, and quick wit and humor. However, I would caution first-time Austen readers against Emma and more towards Pride and Prejudice - it is easy to give up on Emma if you're unused to Jane Austen and her writing style.
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I am unsure whether Emma or Persuasion is Austen's best novel. Other's are funnier (Pride & Prejudice); others more expansive (Sense & Sensibility). Perhaps it is the more serious notes in these two I like so much. By rights we shouldn't like Emma at all. Spoiled, full of herself and her opinions and more then a bit patronizing, it is a testimony to Austen's skill as a writer that we like her at all, much less grow fond of her as most do.
It is the contrast to goody-two-shoes Jane Fairfax that saves her from censor. Jane is such a Mary Sue we forgive much waiting for her denouement and deliverance into Mr. Knightley's arms.

Mr. Knightley is, in truth, a bit of a prig but so throughly decent and completely in love we forgive much. As usual, an Austen novel is peppered with noteworthy secondary characters as delightful as the main. Miss Bates and Mr. Elton are my especial favorites though Mrs. Elton and Harriet Smith certainly deserve an honorable mention. "Shocking" behavior includes a pointedly rude remark at a picnic and an intended snub at a dance. There are no surprise endings in an Austen novel, but there can be nuance. Emma is loaded with it. Our heroine is taken right up to the precipice of disagreeable; our Mary Sue pairs of with a bit of a rogue.

It's all quite delightful and genteel. A perfectly marvelous comedy of manners.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
To tell the truth I'm not sure how to review this book, but I'll give it a go anyway. Emma, by Jane Austen, is one of those novels that has you really wanting to find out what happens, at the same time that you truly dislike the protagonist. At least I did. In fact, Austen was quoted as saying about the book, that she was going to write about a character who "no one but myself will much like". Boy, was she right.

Austen seemed to be well aware of just how different Emma Woodhouse was from the heroines of her other works. She was spoiled and snobbish, and really did not possess as many good qualities, but I really think that this was a purposeful choice on Austen's party. This is just my theory, obviously, but I think it obvious that Austen was deliberately writing a story using a woman who embodied the most disquieting cultural ideas of the period (ideas that Austen herself didn't much like, it seems), and still seeing if she could make her sympathetic. In other words, Emma was a woman of her times, and then some.

As the story begins, Emma is attending the wedding of her former governess, Miss Taylor, who Emma believes wholeheartedly that she is responsible for pairing up with her now husband, Mr. Weston. How much influence Miss Woodhouse really had on the match is, of course, debatable. Given subsequent events, one would be forgiven for not believing she could have had much to do with it at all, given that the couple is actually happy and together.

But all of that is neither here nor there. The point is that, as the narrative begins, Emma is feeling flushed with excitement over this new marriage of a couple that she sincerely believes she was responsible for bringing together. She decides she is quite good at this, and will help others.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Having loved Pride and Prejudice, I assumed that I would love this book too. But honestly, the further I got, the more I felt as if reading it was a chore. The tiny and isolated world of Emma Woodhouse and her friends felt like a snowglobe -- lots of things were moving, but nothing was really happening and nothing new ever seemed to be introduced. Emma, a snobby busybody, seems to be the sort of character that one is supposed to love because of (not in spite of) her flaws, but I couldn't bring myself to be to connected to her world in any way. Having Emma be rich and secure removes a lot of the tension that drives some of Austen's more memorable stories. Elements of economic reality are in this story, but I found myself frequently wishing that this had been a story about Jane Fairfax, not Emma.

If you're a fan of Austen, you may love this story -- it just left me pretty unimpressed.
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By kmh on October 18, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Is there any other writer who can sum up a character so perfectly and succinctly as Jane Austen? In the first two pages the reader learns everything he or she needs to know about the protagonist of the story, Emma Woodhouse, including the fact that she thinks a little too highly of herself and that she is used to getting her own way. The story flows effortlessly from there. Every sentence is polished and the characters are drawn so vividly that you often forget that you don’t know them personally outside of the book.

There are a lot of lessons to be learned from Emma’s mistakes, especially not meddle in other people’s romantic lives. When Emma tries to arrange a match for her friend, Harriet Smith, things do not go as planned.

With Emma, Jane Austen proves that you can write a flawed character who the reader will still root for. Emma may be misguided, but her heart is in the right place. This might be the proper time to emphasize the fact that you should not see the movie adaptation of this book. Gweneth Paltrow sucks the charm out of the character and makes her so obnoxious that it could turn you off the story altogether.

The quality of the writing, the depth of the characters, and the exploration of relationships is what makes Emma my favourite Jane Austen novel. I have re-read it half a dozen times over the years and it never fails to disappoint.

Disclaimer: I received a digital copy of this book from Story Cartel in exchange for my honest review.
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