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An Empire of Small Places: Mapping the Southeastern Anglo-Indian Trade, 1732-1795 (Early American Places Ser.) Paperback – September 1, 2012

4.5 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

This is an important and insightful analysis of the development of colonial Augusta, the Indian trade, and the geography of the Southeast. Paulett convincingly demonstrates how the region was transformed geographically from a world where Natives and newcomers understood that they were interconnected by a series of paths to one where they believed they lived in discrete neighborhoods. This ideological and physical transformation has tremendous explanatory value and will be of interest to historians of the early South, Native Americans, urban America, and the frontier in general.

(Andrew K. Frank author of Creeks and Southerners: Biculturalism on the Early American Frontier)

In this interesting and engaging book, Paulett contributes to important conversations about eighteenth-century colonialism and Indian- European relations.

(Joshua Piker author of Okfuskee: A Creek Indian Town in Colonial America)

[Robert Paulett] encourages us to understand the early American South as a landscape made by interactions among American Indians, European Americans, and enslaved African American laborers.

(Bob Edmonds McCormick Messenger)

Robert Paulett has given us a refreshing consideration of life in the eighteenth-century deerskin trade. His focus on disparate groups occupying the same arena but living different experiences challenges us to reimagine the complexities of life among multiple cultures and changing landscapes. . . . [H]is work adds new information and a different perspective to studies of the American South.

(Sarah H. Hill Southern Spaces)

The blend of geography, history, and social observation makes for a fine survey examining Britain’s colonial empire in North America and its economic and political ties with various Indian nations.

(Midwest Book Review)

Any scholar of the colonial South, particularly those interested in Indians and slavery, will want to add this title to her or his bookshelf. (Lisa L. Crutchfield South Carolina Historical Magazine)

About the Author

Robert Paulett is an assistant professor of history at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville.
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Product Details

  • Series: Early American Places Ser.
  • Paperback: 264 pages
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press (September 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0820343471
  • ISBN-13: 978-0820343471
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #905,707 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

By Robert Davis Jr. on March 10, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of many books needed to better understand the Southeast in early American History; it is well written and researched.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I like this book but feel that the average reader will find it difficult to read. I recommend this book to serious students of Creek and Georgia and Alabama history but not to the casual reader. It is not "light reading", how ever it is professional and well researched.

As a long time collector of books of anything related to Creek Indians and early Alabama and Georgia history I ordered this book with great anticipation of seeing maps of trading paths. There are about 10 maps offered in this book but there is one big problem...the maps are not legible. I dont blame this on the author but the printer. Why the University of Ga would print a book with maps one cannot read is beyond me. I recently read the very fine book on Fort Mims by Dr Waselkov and he provided many maps that are highly legible so this proves that good maps can be done by book printers if they want to. It takes some effort.

The map on the front of the book, very legible, done by a Chickasaw Indian is a stunning map but there is one problem..its almost impossible to interpret and the author doesn't attempt to interpret it. The wording on it is in French and there is no translation. The author gets a bit caught up in "spatial" concepts about how Indians interpreted and made maps which got beyond my understanding. The author wonders off often into area of "spatial concepts" in history and architecture related to history and even maps and geography but often in mystical ways that lost me.

Thus, if you are interested in this book to study trading paths and maps of the time period of 1730s to 1790s-- you will be disappointed as was I.
The maps are difficult to read and I was ready to stop reading the book when I discovered this.
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