Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $3.46 (22%)
FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The End of the Free Marke... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations? Paperback – September 27, 2011

3.9 out of 5 stars 67 customer reviews

See all 11 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.54
$2.48 $2.33

Wiley Finance & Trading Sale
Wiley Finance & Trading Sale
Save up to 40% on the latest trading, investing, and wealth management guides. Shop now.
$12.54 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?
  • +
  • Every Nation for Itself: What Happens When No One Leads the World
  • +
  • Superpower: Three Choices for America's Role in the World
Total price: $38.29
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ian Bremmer is a president of Eurasia Group, the world's leading global politcal risk research and consulting firm. He has written for The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, Newsweek, and Foreign Affairs. His most recent books include The J Curve and The Fat Tail. He lives in New York City and Washington, D.C.

Review

"Many scholars have begun to analyze state capitalism. One of the clearest and most comprehensive treatments is The End of the Free Market by Ian Bremmer."
-David Brooks, New York Times

"Mr. Bremmer... provides a wide-ranging account of the rise of state capitalism and he litters his prose with apposite examples and acute insights. Nobody with a serious interest in the current dilemma should pass it by."
-The Economist

"Brilliant and indispensible. One of the preeminent political analysts of our time with the must-read book for how politics and global markets are converging at our peril."
-Nouriel Roubini, Chairman of Roubini Global Economics

"From the stories of deadly rioting at a Chinese factory to the Russian prime minister's grocery shopping to the construction site of an entirely new Saudi city, this is a fascinating story with a timely and important message: American- style free-market democracy might not be the wave of the future."
- Fareed Zakaria, editor, Newsweek International; author of The Post- American World

"The End of the Free Market is both fresh and provocative. It illuminates the subtle, yet powerful, geopolitical and economic undercurrents that must be understood by all of us."
- Greg Brown, CEO of Motorola

"Ian Bremmer's understanding of international commerce and politics is peerless. The End of the Free Market holds essential insights for anyone conducting business on the global level."
- Sallie Krawcheck, President, global wealth and investment management, Bank of America

"A powerful analysis of the new emerging world order by an author who is always full of insights."
- George Osborne, MP, shadow chancellor of the Exchequer

"Ian Bremmer's book couldn't have come at a better time. An essential guide to the future of the world economy, The End of the Free Market describes the coming war for the soul of capitalism. It offers useful insights for investors, business leaders, and anyone interested in how to survive this coming global confrontation."
- David Smick, Global policy strategist and author of The World Is Curved: Hidden Dangers to the Global Economy
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Portfolio (September 27, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591844401
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591844402
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (67 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #580,113 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Kevin Currie-Knight VINE VOICE on April 24, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Despite the fact that the Cold War is 20 years over, we still tend to think in an unfortunate paradigm that sees 'communism' and 'capitalism' as the two major political categories. This book is written to let us know about the existence and growing presence of a third category: state capitalism. A quote from Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao (taken from a CNN interview and used in the book) well illustrates what state capitalism is: "The complete formulation of our economic policy is to give full play to the basic role of market forces in allocating resources under the macroeconomic guidance and regulation of the government. More bluntly, state capitalism is a market that is in large degree controlled by the government. Companies exist, but often serve political ends.

The book was motivated, it seems, by the 2009-2009 economic bust and explaining why this both strengthens nations that are already practice state capitalism and encourages more folks to defend state capitalism as an alternative to the free markets that many (rightly or wrongly, as the author puts it) blame for the bust.

Make no mistake: the author of this book is not writing in support of state capitalism, but simply wants us to be more aware of what it is, what its strengths and weaknesses are, and why it affects us. The author himself, though, writes as a supporter of semi-free markets with minimal, but necessary, regulation.

The first half of "The End of Free Markets" is devoted to explaining state capitalism. It developed primarily as an outgrowth of the Cold War. China and Russia both experienced broken communist regimes and the impossibility of replacing those regimes with largely unregulated markets.
Read more ›
11 Comments 122 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is an excellent briefing book. It doesn't drive a single idea, offer a polemic position or try to be controversial. It is thus a hype-free reliable guide to a complex subject. The sequence of logic is centrist and carefully couched. It shows how state capitalism, rather than socialism, is the growing counter to liberal capitalism, in Russia, China, Saudi Arabia and many smaller economies. This is not driven by ideology and Bremmer convincingly argues against any coming Armageddon or WWF wrestling contest of King Kong Commies take on Freedom Fighting Finance Whizzes. He shows that the drivers of state capitalism are very much centered on political control of resources and power and of job creation. It adopts a very domestic focus and is as short-term in its focus as the earnings-driven Wall Street community. He points not so much to the distortions of markets and the misallocation of national resource this leads to as the absence of countervailing forces that are intrinsic to liberal democracies. He emphasizes the commonality of axiomatic belief in market forces that underlies countries like Norway, France and Germany that are too often classified as anti-markets. Under all the rhetoric is an often tense balancing of economics and business versus the intersection of politics and social priorities. Bremmer is pretty convincing in showing that state capitalism does not overall provide the better blueprint for growth but also that it will continue to grow because of its political rather than economic focus.

My test in rating the book was to consider three questions:

1. Would I recommend it to someone largely unfamiliar with the issues to get a sound grounding. A definite 'yes' here.
Read more ›
Comment 63 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
My review reprinted from Huffington Post:

Political risk guru Ian Bremmer examines the growing momentum of "state capitalism" in his new book The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War between States and Corporations? Bremmer argues that state capitalism differs from free-market capitalism in that politics rather than profit is the main driver of decision-making. For this reason, it threatens to curtail free markets and the global economy. It is the latest chapter in the "rise of the rest," or the expansion of non-Western states in the international system.

Capitalism takes many forms but all of them can be distinguished by their "use of wealth to create more wealth, a broad enough definition to capture both free-market and state capitalism," Bremmer notes. In the free-market form of capitalism, the job of the state is to "enable" wealth generation by enforcing contracts and limiting the influence of moral bads such as greed--the latter can lead to market failures, which have occurred periodically since the Dutch tulip craze of 1637. Free-market governments attempt to ensure that the economic game is played fairly.

In contrast to free-market capitalism, the economy in state-capitalist regimes is dominated by the state agenda. "Forced to choose between the protection of the rights of the individual, economic productivity, and the principle of consumer choice, on the one hand, and the achievement of political goals, on the other, state capitalists will choose the latter every time," Bremmer explains. Continuing the sports game analogy, state capitalists control the referees as well as the main players.

Bremmer admits that state capitalism isn't new.
Read more ›
Comment 19 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The End of the Free Market: Who Wins the War Between States and Corporations?