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End Transmission

4.1 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

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Audio CD, September 24, 2002
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Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Snapcase have always promotedfreethinking through communication and the unrelenting quest for change. As one of the most progressive and influential bands in independent music, Snapcase have lead the movement to combine intellectual theory with aggressive music for over ten years. Many of today's most sought-after bands including P.O.D. and Thursday have cited Snapcase as one of their main influences. Throughout Snapcase's pragmatic career they have been revered as one of the most innovative, intelligent and undeniably inspirational bands around. From their first release on Victory, a 7" titled "Comatose" to their revolutionary "Progression Through Unlearning" and their millennial document, "Designs for Automotion", they have continually altered the direction of underground music. Snapcase has become famous for the subtly evolving shifts in their musical persona; "End Transmission" is the latest chapter in their fascinating career. "End Transmission" tells the tale of Snapcase's cerebral, conceptual vision of a futuristic society. Snapcase has built a stellar reputation for composing lyrics exploring themes of self-determination, affirmation and personal challenge. With complex guitar lines, harmonic distortion, and relentless rhythms, they create the sonic explosion that has evolved Snapcase into one of hardcore's greatest bands.

Amazon.com

Few bands build on the smart and socially conscious punk-rock template sketched out by Bad Religion more profoundly than Buffalo's Snapcase. This is a good thing, especially since they throw in nods to Rage Against the Machine and Jane's Addiction, too. And Snapcase go one better by being one louder than their forebears, worrying less about semantics and more about sheer force. End Transmission is a furious, screaming menagerie of shouted vocals, punishing guitar, and throbbing drums. But it's also hardcore for the emotionally in-touch--you'd be hard pressed to find many Snapcase contemporaries who can spin a lyric as artful as "I remember the feeling / A vision of light and water combined." Granted, much of the nuance is lost in the howling delivery, but it's nice to know that those fists are pumping along to something meaningful. If there's a complaint to be had with the relentlessly heavy End Transmission--and it's a small one--it's that there's a certain sameness to songs that are all turned up to 11, or at least end up there at some point. Still, since it's safe to assume few Sarah McLachlan types attend Snapcase shows, it's probably a moot point after all. --Kim Hughes
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 24, 2002)
  • Original Release Date: September 24, 2002
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Victory
  • Run Time: 39 minutes
  • ASIN: B00006C79C
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #233,354 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Kerry Ledbetter on December 28, 2002
Format: Audio CD
Is the hardcore scene getting more jaded and closed-minded on purpose? Hardcore used to be the outlet for all those individuals who wanted to be so creative that they didn't fit in anywhere else. Now, there are all these little "rules" about what's hardcore and what's not. But don't worry, in a few years the kids will grow up a little and stop worrying about their hardcore image and the fresh group of immature kids will take over. Then, the entire hardcore scene will shift yet again and have a totally new set of "rules" that you have to follow to be "true". The one thing that will remain the same, however, is that hardcore is no longer open-minded or creative. Every time a hardcore band brings in new influences or does something truly special, they are practically booted out of the scene or pressured into going back to a formulaic sound.
Enter: Snapcase
This band was one of the few hardcore bands that somehow walked the line of being "true" while still pushing the genre to keep evolving. With 'End Transmission', they've finally pushed too far and music lovers everywhere can be greatful. This just isn't hardcore anymore. It isn't stilted into any of the formulas that are mandated for modern hardcore. This isn't all power chords and breakdowns. 'End Transmission' is artistically fresh, musically creative, and emotionally intense.
Snapcase have blended their hardcore roots with a melodic, almost indie rock feel. Don't think this is "emo" by any stretch of the imagination. It's too focused and precise for that. The songs are catchy without ever being formulaic. Accessible without ever seeming commercial. Dark without ever feeling morbid.
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By A Customer on September 24, 2002
Format: Audio CD
anyone whos heard "progression through unlearning" by snapcase will know that it had solid riffs that were very hard and good catchy song structures that would stick in your head for weeks.
Like all hardcore albums, they PTU was very short and sweet and a definite classic. Its very sad to see good hardcore bands go under and quit or sell out, but its a solid fact of music, music has to move on and stay fresh or its not worth writing recording or buying. So when a band like snapcase peaks in their heavyness after their second album, you have to wonder where they will go next. Well after listening to end transmission, i can say that it isnt a progression throught unlearning pt 2 or even a designs for automotion pt 2, its not as heavy, but fortunatly for snapcase they actually they pulled a new album off that doesnt sound like their past work at all but still sounds like snapcase. The whole album, right down to the packaging gives off a very different atmosphere. Overall I must say that im impressed where snapcase is going. The songs arent standard snapcase structure, they experiment alot and even pull off five, six minute songs which is rare. Yet with all these new ideas brought to the table, you'd think that there would be some confusion, but snapcase pulls it off in excellent form. Snapcase fans should indulge in this masterpiece.
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Format: Audio CD
Snapcase deliver on one of the most anticipated hardcore albums of the year. The familiar Snapcase power and package is present throughout the entire CD, but Snapcase is definitely looking to make a statement. It sounds as if there have been heavy influences from bands such as the Deftones and At The Drive-In throughout the disc as Snapcase have raised the bar in hardcore by involving ambient breaks and making the music much more complex than your average hardcore album. Even with the experimentation there is still the trademark sound and the songs on this disc are no less heavy than anything on one of their prior releases.
While this release treads new ground there are a few bumps along the road but it only leaves more room for growth. Look for this to be a pivotal recording in the band's history, I can't wait to hear what their next release will sound like.
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Format: Audio CD
I first heard about Snapcase from a friend when he gave me their album End Transmission. I was skeptical at first, but as I began to listen to it I was amazed at how talented this band really is. This album has excellent guitar riffs mixed with a distinct brand of vocals. I especially enjoyed the vocal effects used in A Synthesis of Classic Forms. I also liked the songs Coagulate, Exile Etiquette, and Hindsight. The only negative comment that I have is that all of the songs start to sound the same after a while. I had to take off a star due to lack of vocal variations. All in all, this album is worth buying. I hope that this review helps.
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Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
The fact that this album didn't get more exposure is unfortunate. Snapcase's earlier albums were decent but nothing that I would consider defining. When End Transmission came out I realized I was listening to a more polished band, maybe less raw aggression but more nuanced sound. One of my favorite albums. I had bought the CD in 2003 but have no idea where it is now. $5 for this was a steal.
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Format: Audio CD
By 2002, Hardcore was on life support. Most of the foundational bands: Quicksand, Inside Out, 108 and Mind Over Matter had long since called it a day. In 1998 Refused gifted us with "The Shape Of Punk To Come," the prophetic shot across the bow that the end was in sight for this scene. Even by then pop had crawled out from under the rock Grunge remanded it to and Nu Metal, like audible tuberculosis, had utterly infected our radios. By 2002, the writing was on the wall (probably with little "X"s around it), that it was time for Hardcore to pull the plug.

Unlike Grunge, HC was not going to die a slow, uninspired death; poisoned by a Kid Nickel Smack or Seven Mary Creed. Not even close. Snapcase, one of the genre's most well respected bands both in the studio and on a stage, insured that not only their own legacy, but that of 90's hardcore would be properly cemented. So much more than a death rattle, Snapcase's final proper record was and remains their most complex and polarizing effort (provided we go ahead and ignore Bright Flashes, which we will). To this point, no 90's Hardcore band was more formulaic than Snapcase. They were the poster children for surgical precision Hardcore, delivering record after record of audible energy and frenetic DIY ethos. With End Transmission however, Snapcase threw us a curveball. Perhaps that's why this record maintains its underdog status among the "die hards" and a place of honor in my record collection.

From the pale purple cover to the trapezoidal bar code to the cleverly folded inner sleeve, even the packaging hinted that this was not going to be a standard issue Hardcore record. The album doesn't start that way, however.
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