Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Qty:1
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
Ending the French Revolut... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Item in very good condition and at a great price! Textbooks may not include supplemental items i.e. CDs, access codes etc... All Day Low Prices!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Ending the French Revolution: Violence, Justice, and Repression from the Terror to Napoleon Paperback – November 29, 2007

3.0 out of 5 stars 2 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$27.50
$27.50 $22.49

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
$27.50 FREE Shipping. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Ending the French Revolution: Violence, Justice, and Repression from the Terror to Napoleon
  • +
  • The Terror: The Merciless War for Freedom in Revolutionary France
  • +
  • The First Total War: Napoleon's Europe and the Birth of Warfare as We Know It
Total price: $49.36
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is one of the most important pieces of scholarship on the French Revolution since the 1989 bicentennial. Howard Brown's book provides a new, compelling, and thought-provoking interpretation of the events, linking them to broader historical and social scientific problems in a fresh and challenging manner. The book will be of remarkable and unusual interest to scholars in a wide variety of fields." -- David Bell, The Johns Hopkins University

About the Author

Howard G. Brown, Professor of History at Binghamton University, State University of New York, is the author of War, Revolution, and the Bureaucratic State: Politics and Army Administration in France, 1791-1799 and coeditor of Taking Liberties: Problems of a New Order from the French Revolution to Napoleon.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 480 pages
  • Publisher: University of Virginia Press (November 29, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0813927293
  • ISBN-13: 978-0813927299
  • Product Dimensions: 6.3 x 1.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #457,072 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

5 star
0%
4 star
50%
3 star
0%
2 star
50%
1 star
0%
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
There are books on historic subjects that combine solid scholarship with impressive prose and readability. Unfortunately, this is not one of them.

I have read a fair amount about the French revolution as well as a fine biography of Robespierre. I have also read biographical works on Napoleon and the Napoleonic wars. There was a gap in my knowledge, however: the years in between.

I was searching for an account of the transition between the dwindling Revolution and Napoleon’s ascent. I wanted to know more about the nature of the Consulat and Directoire and how they worked. Howard Brown’s book appeared to be the answer.

To my regret I quickly realized that it wasn’t. Not that it lacks the relevant material; its pages are crammed with fact upon fact. But this is a book written for that handful of scholarly researchers (and I assume there are a number out there) who remain indifferent to the quality of the prose. They may well be unaware of what good prose is like. Hungry only for historical detail, the caliber of language or narrative is of no interest to them.

Few lay readers, I suspect, will be willing to plough through this dense and ponderous work with its jargon plagued sentences and meandering semi-coherent paragraphs. The book itself is 358 pages long; the preface, appendices, notes, bibliography and index constitute another 114 pages.

Whatever happened to those wonderful historians who combined deep learning with a sweeping elegance of language? One relished their work because reading it induced not just knowledge but pleasure as well . They are a breed in decline, it sadly seems.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This is admittedly a difficult book to read. It is also pretty theoretical, as it makes reference to theorists such as Thomas Hobbes and Max Weber. However, Brown does delve into a period of French History which is highly complex and makes an intelligible book in the process of doing so. The books basically makes a reference to a group of bandits which had been restricting the flow of trade in France since at least the 18th century. During the period of the Directorate (1799-1804), a consolidation in the police and military forces occurred which had been relatively more successful in maintaining order in France. This books also gives the reader a sense of what Napoleon Bonaparte and his cronies had been up to before they launched the Napoleonic Wars.
To make head-and-tail of this book, it may admittedly be helpful to already be well-versed in French History. The book also has much dark subject-matter. However, the thesis of the book has some relevance for issues affecting global society today. For instance, the French Revolution was highly inspired by the literature and political thought of Jean-Jacques Rousseau. With the prospects of direct democracy and a unicameral legislature on the horizon, many former French subjects gladly rallied to the call for 'Liberty, Equality and Fraternity.' However, the message of the book was that a share divide between state and society in France resulted in the final analysis, not a more unitary political culture. In the author's words, 'Hobbes triumphed over Rousseau.' Nowadays, it helpful for citizens of any country to be familiar with the law when a 'Weberian legal-rational society' is in the making. However, people have to ask themselves whether or not the conditions of everyone will improve. If that does not happen, will an oppressive political monopoly consolidate its control over the whole society? This book helps remind the reader that promises often do not match up with results. Recommended reading.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Ending the French Revolution: Violence, Justice, and Repression from the Terror to Napoleon
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Ending the French Revolution: Violence, Justice, and Repression from the Terror to Napoleon