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England's Newest Hit Makers: The Rolling Stones

4.3 out of 5 stars 18 customer reviews

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Audio CD, October 25, 1990
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Editorial Reviews

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The Stones got their groove on early, making one of the few originals here, the blues pastiche "Little by Little," a standout in terms of cool-eyed intensity. While taking on Chuck Berry, Muddy Waters, Buddy Holly and Marvin Gaye on a debut album would rightfully have daunted many a young band, this bunch just rocks it all. Outside the general toughness of sound and the front-cover glares, there's little of the badass 'tude-mongering that would begin to define them with the next album; here, Jagger, Richards, Jones, Wyman and Watts are mainly about the music, which they essay with a respectful insolence. --Rickey Wright
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Abkco
  • ASIN: B000003BDV
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #199,560 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD
I remember this being the first full Lp that I ever purchased in 64, up to that point it was only 45's. The record was then and still is in my opinion one of the best put together, powerful and solid R&B/Blues/Rock debuts of all time. These guys gave 120% then and are still doing it 35 years later. It is obvious of their American influences at that point. Artist's such as Chuck Berry, Rufus Thomas, Bobby Womack, Buddy Holly, Marvin Gaye etc. I strongly recommend this record as one of the top 10 of the past 35 years. I myself own the complete Stones catalog of recordings and would advise picking up as many as possible. I would start with these five and work from that point: This one (Englands's Newest Hitmakers), (The London Years Singles Box Set), (Out Of Their Heads), (Bridges To Babylon) and (Got Live If You Want It). This will give a solid overview of the Stones history and you can go from there. You can't miss with these guys.
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Format: Audio CD
This is basically the UK album The Rolling Stones with Not Fade Away replacing a cover of Bo Diddley's Mona, and a silly subtitle added. Recorded at a time when none of the band had been to America and the closest they'd got to Chuck Berry or Howlin' Wolf was playing a record, this sets the template for the next few years: a mix of high-energy rock (check Keith's brilliant solo on Carol), soul covers and minor originals. But this debut is also the most blues-oriented album they'd produce until Beggar's Banquet, with nods to Jimmy Reed, Slim Harpo and Muddy Waters. By their next album they would have ditched the blues for a more contemporary R&B sound. An enormously influential LP, it still sounds great today, even though Mick wouldn't hit his stride for a few years yet.
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Format: Audio CD
The self-titled debut album by The Rolling Stones laid the blueprint for the next several releases of their career. They had a couple of original songs and a liberal dose of the hardcore rhythm & blues that made them the evil twins of the Beatles. The first three songs "Not Fade Away", "Route 66" & "I Just Want To Make Love To You" (later made famous by Foghat) all show the raw energy of the band. "Tell Me" is a fine original composition. "I'm A King Bee" sets up the Mick Jagger persona of the sexual lothario and "Carol" starts the trend of having a Chuck Berry cover on their first few albums. The album shows off the band's potential and although it doesn't always hit, "Can I Get A Witness" and "Walking The Dog" to name two, it is a solid debut.
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Format: Audio CD
This offering is not too bad. It is nice to know that the Stones first two efforts were about equal and then they took off from there (unlike bands these days who peak on their debut album and then decline from there). As fas as this one goes, it has some pretty good tracks on it (especially King Bee, I Just Want to Make Love to You and Tell Me) but it is sometimes hampered by silliness (Walking the Dog has never been one of my favorites) and the album has one too many songs with the word Witness in the title. It's no masterpiece but it's a fun listen and it surely doesn't make the ears bleed. And, after all, its the Stones for the love of John!
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By A Customer on December 7, 1999
Format: Audio CD
This is a pretty good first album. Their later stuff is much better but this was a good start. I especially like I Just Want to Make Love To You, King Bee, Route 66,and Little by Little. Really though, theres not a bad song on the album. Tell Me is a little out of place but thats because its the first song Keith and Mick wrote together. Its a good, energetic first album and you can tell that they really loved and respected the blues.
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
The song titles for this album form complete sentences when read sequentially.
Not Fade Away, Route 66. I Just Want To Make Love To You, Honest I Do, Now I've Got A Witness. Little By Little, I'm A King Bee. Carol, Tell Me, Can I Get A Witness?
You Can Make It If You Try Walking The Dog.
I first noticed this when I was a teenager and got this on LP sometime in the 1960s. Just thought I would mention it.
The albums with guitars by Keith Richard and Brian Jones have the best deep cuts [or non-hits]. The albums with guitars by Keith Richard and Mick Taylor have the
best guitar solos. The albums with guitars by Keith Richard and Ronnie Wood have the most songs that I don't listen to more than once.
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Format: Audio CD
Most of the reviews of this album (which was originally released in the UK without any title....the Band wanted people to ask for "the Rolling Stones album") sound like the reviewer is hearing the Stones for the 1st time. Come On! (which is the one song that should have been included on the album), this one features no less than *5* signature songs! The best version of Carol done until the Stones themselves topped it with the live versions in the 80s, the classic Route 66 (which they still do), Mick's 1st signature song in Buddy Holly's Not Fade Away, Willie Dixon's I Just Want To Make Love To You (years before Mick would make headlines mouthing the much less controversial Let's Spend The Night Together on the Ed Sullivan Show), and the 1st Jagger/Richards composition Tell Me (which is still hard to get out of your head). And this doesn't even get into the 2 Motown groove pieces Can I Get A Witness and Walking the Dog. Now, try to think of another band that came anywhere near this on their 1st release....not many....perhaps the Beatles, but jeesh, at least the Stones didn't do any Broadway hits!
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