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on April 20, 2016
I learned so much from this book. I had a hard time reading it at first, but became very interested from the sociological viewpoint when the author explained how the children who had taken the train, and their mothers felt about each other after years of separation. I was also interested in the interviews at the end with Enrique, and with the author, Sonia Nazario. I got a mental picture of immigration in our country which is every bit as profound a migration as is happening in Europe with the war in Syria bringing more immigrants than they can handle. The immigration to our country is also similar in numbers seeking asylum. I hope that we can welcome our natural immigrants as people who will enrich our society, rather than hinder it. Californians have accepted and assimilated immigrants better and longer than many other states. It can be done.
3 people found this helpful
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on July 27, 2014
I cannot write enough good things about this book. This book is another example of my conviction that only seasoned journalists should be allowed to write and publish books. Like William Rempel's book At the Devil's Table, Sonia Nazario's fine book has pulled together a myriad of relevant details and important facts in order to deliver a flawless performance telling the story of not only Enrique but the thousands of other children who leave Central American countries every year embarking on the dangerous journey that takes them though Mexico searching for their parents who left to start a better life in the US. I am not a particularly fast reader, but the unfortunate problem with books like this is that they are so compelling, gripping, and well-written that you cannot put them down, blowing through the entire book until you no longer have a good book to read. The author covers the subject in depth and breadth and suggests some solutions, although I suspect these are intractable problems that will always be with us.
4 people found this helpful
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on January 30, 2018
Sloppy writing and too disorganized for my taste. This book was a cluster of information, and I cannot believe my instructor thought this book was okay to do an essay on. Despite using footnotes, page markings for references, and obtaining quotes for evidence I had to create a timeline for this book. More than once I noticed the inaccuracy Sonia Nazario had when writing this book, so did my mother who was an immigrant coming to the USA at the age of seven. I really think the only reason I got an A was because my mother helped me with this essay on her real life experiences, and not by some writer who went around and got streams of information and stories by locals in the area.
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on September 9, 2017
I did this for my Summer reading and I loved every page of it. I ended up finishing in 2 days because I just couldn’t put it down. It changed my view of Illegal immigration and made come to understand it. Enrique’s journey was very detailed and I felt like I was going on an adventure with Enrique himself. Towards the end of the book, Nazario had an interview with Random House Reader Circle where she discussed about how she visited Argentina and saw it in a similar state. Fast forward in Nuevo Laredo, she met Enrique and wanted to follow and ask questions about him. I personally think it;s very strong of the author to do that even though she lived a sheltered life with her parents up 13 when she lost her father to a heart attack. If you want to understand how family abandonment and immigration feels, I recommend this book.
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on July 4, 2015
This book was on my daughter's summer reading list for school. I decided to read it as well. This book really made me think about life from the immigrant's perspective. It also made me feel guilty for all I have and times when it's hard to make ends meet at my house. Wonderful book that I think everyone living in America should read. It may or may not change your beliefs but it will wake you up on how good you have it.
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VINE VOICEon July 6, 2012
"Enrique's Journey" is the true story of a boy who decides to travel illegally from Central America to the United States in an attempt to be reunited with his mother. Many poor Central American women leave their children in the care of relatives and go to the United States in search of work. They regularly send money home to their families, but some of them never actually see their children again. In this case, Enrique's mother, Lourdes, is working in the U.S., and Enrique is determined to be reunited with her. The book chronicles his terrifying and dangerous journey, which entails hitching rides on top of freight trains, steering clear of gangbangers and crooked law enforcement officials, relying on the occasional kindness of strangers, and hoping to stay alive.

I agree with some other reviewers that the book seemed to repeat itself quite a lot, but still, the incredible nature of this story still led me to give the book five stars. It's terrifying to think of how many migrants go through things like this. It's amazing that any of them actually live to tell about it.
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on November 15, 2016
The book was very interesting and put me in the shoes of kids who's mothers had left them in Nicoragua, Mexico, or Guatemala to go to the United States. It is a story of this boy named Enrique, and his mother had left him to go to the U.S. to make more money. Their mothers would send them money back to keep them going. Kids couldn't handle not being with their parents so they would travel on trains for thousands of miles in hope to one day find their mother. In the book it talks about kids jumping from trains to trains while they are moving. Many kids would die trying to jump. That wasn't the only hard part of the travel, there are gangs that are at train stations and on top of the trains taking control. If anyone is curious about what these kids go through, this would be a great book to learn from.
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on October 14, 2016
I could not put it down. I was very impressed withe the Author and all of her research. I had no idea, that this actually happens in this day and age, it is terrifying. Not only because of their trying to better and feed their family, and have to make this trek, but that their country isn't helping any of their nationals, with living better or services or programs to help these families! !! How can a country treat their people like animals, and with no reguard to their well being!! It sure opened my eyes!
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on March 19, 2017
An important story of one of millions of children who embark on the dangerous journey to join their parents in the US. This story is enough proof that a wall won't keep immigrants out, it'll just give armed guards more power to kill, and the journey will some families have to make to reunite will just be a more perilous one.
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on May 30, 2009
Most Americans would be shocked to know that the most difficult part of an illegal immigrant's journey from Central America to the USA is not avoiding the USA's border patrol, but a life threatening journey through Mexico. This is an eye-opening true story. The author has done extensive research, the story is the stuff of a Hollywood movie, very suspenseful, to the point where the journey is so full of obstacles that the reader will end up rooting for Enrique, a Honduran teenager attempting to re-unite with his mother already illegally in the U.S.
The other surprise presented in this book is the author's social concern that Central American families are torn apart when parents go North to find work in the USA.. A deal where the material gain is at the expense of losing contact with one parent.
After this book, the next time the reader sees a group of Hispanic laborers , you can not help but wonder, Have any of them gone through this similar harrowing experience?
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