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Entangled Audible – Unabridged

4.0 out of 5 stars 216 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Audible Audio Edition
  • Listening Length: 17 hours and 39 minutes
  • Program Type: Audiobook
  • Version: Unabridged
  • Publisher: Audible Studios
  • Audible.com Release Date: April 12, 2011
  • Whispersync for Voice: Ready
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004W5KH3E
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank:

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Entangled is a provocative, raucous, absorbing tale spun by one my favorite authors. Graham Hancock's maiden venture across the fiction line left me intrigued, captivated, provoked, admittedly a bit aghast at moments, and cheering for the brash gritty foul mouthed heroines who in a rather unorthodox way join forces across the eons of time which separate them. This book takes a fresh look at an old topic. Does evil exist? And if it does exist did it also exist when the human species was young? What if the origins of pure evil extend well beyond the dawn of modern man and what if evil in its symbiotic tango with humanity has evolved along with humanity?
Many years ago I read with abandon Jean Auel's Earth Children Series feeling a kinship with Neolithic Man as portrayed through Auel's idyllic eyes. Since then I've grown old and life has grown complex. Values have twisted. Motivation has become obscure. Humanity seems at best fractured if not imploding at break neck speed. Entangled presents a taunting albeit dark and disturbing suggestion as to the origins of crude evil and its ancient dance with the evolving human species.
What if evil has evolved along with man through the ages? Is evil any less reprehensible today having masked itself in a modern military industrial complex, and corporate political facades? Does the brutality of ancient human sacrifice and slaughter somehow parallel the laundered and propagandized collateral damage and loss of innocent life in modern warfare? What of human casualties incurred in "natural disasters" or from "acts of god"? How random are they truly?
In reading other reviews, some readers seem to have found Entangled too violent and too graphic. I have two responses. 1st, this type of historical violence happened.
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Format: Paperback
"Entangled" was sort of like reading two different books for me: on one level it's a fun, fast-paced and highly original fantasy novel. On another it is a sort of spot the clues book full of references to the themes and facts contained in Hancock's non-fiction books from the last couple of decades. If you've read "Supernatural" there's definitely a lot in the novel that you'll recognize, from the ancient cave paintings to the modern-day shamans of the Amazon. Plenty of "Fingerprints of the Gods" material too, so that any fan of Hancock's previous work is going to have a lot of fun seeing how he applied his vast knowledge to creating a work of fiction. Highly Recommended.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've enjoyed Hancock's non-fiction archaeological detective books a lot, and after reading his last (Supernatural: Meetings with the Ancient Teachers of Mankind) I couldn't imagine what he'd do next. With this new novel it's clear that he's continued along the same lines of supernatural research leading to more experiences and ideas best expressed in fiction.

Although he is in no way a great novelist, Hancock has crafted an intriguing and exciting page-turner (somewhat like Dan Brown's popular novels, but better written and way more interesting). Perhaps best of all is that he's finally found an editor able to help him trim the fat (probably easier to do for novels than for far-out esoteric-archaeological studies).

Jumping back and forth between 24,000 yrs ago and modern times (southern California and the Amazon forest), as well as their connections through the parallel spirit world of the "Blue Angel", the story is loosely based on a setting inspired by the DMT research of Dr. Rick Strassmann (DMT: The Spirit Molecule: A Doctor's Revolutionary Research into the Biology of Near-Death and Mystical Experiences), the radical cosmic evolutionary ideas of Terence McKenna, traditional Biblical myths (or more accurately their Zoroastrian roots) of a cosmic Good/Evil struggle, and our older shamanic spiritual traditions - in short, a fantasy/sci-fi mix of visionary dream-time experiences and anthropological/consciousness studies. As the cover flap quotes, "...might have been written by J.K.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read Graham Hancock's previous book, Supernatural, last year and was blown away by the new world he brought to life for his readers. Suddenly, the mysterious world of spirit (the astral plane, the heavenly realms, the mindscape, whatever you want to call it) started coming into focus. It felt like a real place, simultaneously terrifying, powerful, and rich with wonder and potential for personal growth.

With the new book, Entangled, Mr. Hancock takes us on a heart-pounding journey into this new world. Instead of using his academic voice, lecturing like some anthropology professor, Mr. Hancock helps us feel what this experience is actually like. Reading the book was so viscerally real I felt as if I, too, had somehow shared in the experience.

The story follows two young women who are drawn into the world of spirit and come to realize and accept their roles in a larger conflict. In between incredible scenes of beauty and discovery there are scenes of non-stop action, and it underscores the fact that people can behave like animals, or worse, and embody the same violence, compassion, and raw energy. Scenes where wildlife are threatening death and destruction are quickly followed by similar death and destruction caused by humans. The tragedy is in knowing the cruelty of the humans is intentional and willful.

Anyone looking for the classic New Age "happiness and light" rhetoric will hate this book. There is no happiness and light out there to rescue the book's protagonists. It's one bloodly conflict after another, constant strife and heartbreak intermingled with extraordinary bravery and tiny successes. This is how life on this planet is. Mr.
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