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Showing 1-2 of 2 reviews(1 star). See all 17 reviews
on November 8, 2009
I remain interested in learning everything I can about running a bottom-line-focused practice. That includes, of course, an appropriate number of satisfied patients, appropriate spending, forward-thinking staff, etc. These are essentials in keeping a private practice in business these days. But, this book does not provide enough details towards this end. For example, almost the entire first half of the book is dedicated to finding a place to set up your business and also how to work within a group of providers (what that has to do with private practice is lost on me). If I had to do it over, I would not have invested in this book. I suggest you save your money and get it from the library if you are curious. If you want to spend money on a good book that is focused on the bottom-line, read "Maximizing Billing and Collections in the Medical Practice" by the AMA--you can buy it used on Amazon:Maximizing Billing and Collections in the Medical Practice It's full of insight on how to set up and keep your practice in business.
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on May 25, 2009
I am a physician in the process of establishing my own practice - and wanted some books to help me along this path. I have been part of a large group, and therefore have some real world experience in the private practice world. This book's author is a psychologist, and I found many sections of the book were just not applicable for a medical practice. For example, in the section on scheduling appointments, the leading suggestion is that the practitioner schedule his/her own appointments as a means of establishing a personal connection. This just doesn't jibe with the reality of a medical practice which has a much higher volume of calls and patients than a therapist - who probably sees 6 to 8 patients per day. Many other aspects of the book are therapist-centric, and either irrelevant or simply inaccurate for a medical practice.
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