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Euripides, Volume IV. Trojan Women. Iphigenia among the Taurians. Ion (Loeb Classical Library No. 10) First Edition Edition

4.2 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0674995741
ISBN-10: 0674995740
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  • Euripides, Volume IV. Trojan Women. Iphigenia among the Taurians. Ion (Loeb Classical Library No. 10)
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  • Euripides: Bacchae. Iphigenia at Aulis. Rhesus (Loeb Classical Library No. 495)
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Editorial Reviews

Review

Over the past decades, Kovacs has published widely on Euripides and can undoubtedly be called one of the specialists in the field of Euripidean manuscripts today. He shows his expertise by a masterly handling of the introductions as well as of the editorial work...All in all, it must be concluded that Kovacs both in his capacity as editor and translator not only meets, but surpasses the expectations put on him. I can only agree with Kevin Lee, who concluded in his review on the two first volumes by saying: 'I look forward to seeing the next stages of Kovacs' important task.'" (Elke Steinmeyer Scolia Reviews)

Kovacs's translations are in fairly literal...and yet very readable English prose. Both experts and generalists will benefit from the work of this experienced Euripidean scholar. (John E. Thorburn Religious Studies Review)

Kovacs's translation is a tour de force... In general, the notes accompanying the translation, explaining such things as geographical and mythological names, are judiciously chosen, concise, and crystal clear... I have nothing but praise for [Kovacs's] scholarship, and the lucidity of his writing, both as translator and commentator. [This volume] should be [the] standard translation for many years to come. (John Davidson Scholia Reviews)

Language Notes

Text: English, Greek (translation)
Original Language: Greek
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Product Details

  • Series: Loeb Classical Library (Book 10)
  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press; First Edition edition (December 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674995740
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674995741
  • Product Dimensions: 4.6 x 0.9 x 6.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #560,701 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
As with much else these days, most readers of Loeb Classical Library editions can be classified as being on the left or on the right. Those “on the left” have pretty good Greek (or Latin, as the case may be) and use the translation mainly as a "trot" for reference, or to be able to read at the beach or in a café without carrying around a dictionary and a grammar. Those “on the right” rely on the translation, but want to be able to consult the original text at least occasionally.

For its recent spate of revised editions, including the present Euripides series being revised by David Kovacs (DK), the LCL has really been letting down readers on the right. It’s been recruiting editors who are experts at textual criticism — even though excellence in that skill is far from a guarantee that the editor can write a translation that will engage a reader. Alan Sommerstein’s rendering of Aeschylus and LCL series editor Jeffrey Henderson’s re-do of the Aristophanes volumes are further examples. The result, especially in DK’s case, is a very dry read.

Here are a couple of excerpts from DK's translation of Trojan Women, one of Euripides's most intense plays, compared to the version by Alan Shaprio (Oxford U Press 2009). All of the passages are in verse in the original:

[159-160]
DK: “My children, already toward the ships of the Achaeans
the oarsmen are moving!”
AS: “The oarsmen of the Greeks are moving
See how they’re moving to the ships”

[235-238, poetry in original]
DK: “Hecuba, you know that I have made frequent journeys to Troy from the Achaean army as a herald: as one previously known to you, I, Talthybius, have come to report news.
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Format: Hardcover
I purchased 3 copies of this volume of Euripides as gift presentation books for 3 of my graduating acting students, who had all performed major roles in our own production of THE TROJAN WOMEN earlier this year. I was EXTREMELY annoyed to find, upon receiving the books, that a large, non-removable adhesive paper label (reading "NEW TRANSLATION") had been plastered across the paper cover of each book. Each label was dirty, smeared and misaligned--one was half torn off the cover; all were impossible to remove with damaging the book cover. An extremely disappointing situation--these books are now completely inappropriate to give as graduation awards.
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Format: Hardcover
Solid, reliable parallel text versions of three plays by Euripides. The translator presents a highly questionable view of The Trojan Women in his Introduction to the play. He claims the drama has no connection with "current events" in the Peloponnesian War, while it's next to incredible that a Greek play has no political subtext. Readers should seek out alternative readings of The Trojan Women.
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Format: Hardcover
This volume from the Loeb Classical Libary offers up parallel English translations and original Greek texts for three classic Greek tragedies by Euripides: "Trojan Women," "Iphigenia Among the Taurians," and "Ion."
As preparations were made for the ruinous expedition against Syracuse, Euripides wrote "The Trojan Women," as a plea for peace. In this play the Greeks do more than enslave women: they have already slain a young girl as a sacrifice to the ghost of Achilles and they take Astyanax, the son of Hector, out of the arms of his mother so that he can be thrown from the walls of Troy. Even the herald of the Greeks, Talthybius, cannot stomach the policies of his people, but is powerless to do anything other than offer hollow words of sympathy. The play also has a strong literary consideration in that the four Trojan Women--Hecuba, Queen of Troy; Cassandra, daughter of Hecuba and Priestess of Apollo; Andromache, widow of Hector; and Helen--all appear in the final chapter of Homer's epic poem the "Iliad," mourning over the corpse of Hector. Of all the Achean leaders we hear about in Homer, only Menelaus, husband of Helen, appears. He appears, ready to slay Helen for having abandoned him to run off to Troy with Paris, but we see his anger melt before her beauty and soothing tones. "The Trojan Women" also reminds us that while we think of Helen as "the face that launched a thousand ships," she was a despised figure amongst the ancient Greeks and there is no satisfaction in her saving her life. The idea that all of these men died just so that she could be returned to the side of her husband is an utter mockery of the dead.
Agamemnon had to sacrifice his daughter Iphigenia to appease the goddess Artemis, but at the last minute the sacrifice was replaced with a stage.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I'm writing some translations of Greek plays, and so I wanted this.
It came quickly and it was in great shape.
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