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Evangelical Reunion: Denominations and the One Body of Christ Paperback – July, 1991

4.7 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 185 pages
  • Publisher: Baker Pub Group (July 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0801035600
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801035609
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 0.5 x 9.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,035,202 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Format: Paperback
Irenic is the term to describe the tone of this study of what can be the subject of the most strident of conversations among believers. In this book, Pastor Frame manages to examine the history of sectarianism within the Church and offers some jewels of wisdom for the reader. Beginning with the first division in the early Church and continuing to now, this book is a study in the processes that led to the present, fragmented Church. Frame challenges every Christian to distinguish between loyalty to Christ and denomination. Offering clear insights, this book is a "must read" for every evangelical.
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Format: Paperback
This book changed my mind. The best I have ever read on ecumenism from a conservative Reformed perspective. Dr. Frame is a Yale graduate, seminary professor, and PCA pastor.

He argues that schism is dangerous stuff, always tragic, and not to be entered into lightly. So, he says, the PCA's leaving the PCUS in 1973 may have been justified, but their not joining up with an existing body like the ARP or OPC at the time was a sin. They made some amends by merging with the RPCES, which itself was a merger of two other bodies. Organic union is not the sole test of catholicity, but it is one important goal. You have to wonder about the PCA and ARP's indifference to even beginning talks of merger.
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Format: Paperback
In Evangelical Reunion, John Frame brings a strong criticism of denominations. He argues that the unity God desires is not simply a spiritual reality but an organizational one that believers are to work to establish and maintain. He does this through appealing to Scripture and what it has to say about unity. It is not uncommon to hear that though God wants The Church to be united it is not doing any harm for us to have denominations. Oftentimes people assume that this is the best way to have harmonious Christian life. We keep people who agree on secondary issues together so there is less for them to argue about. Frame, while acknowledging that denominations do serve some practical purposes names some fifteen damaging consequences for the church as a whole. He goes into depth about some of the challenges we will face in coming together (dealing with doctrinal differences, church government difference, differences in practice, differences in emphasis, our attitudes, and our assumptions.) All these subjects receive their own chapter.

One surprising aspect to me of this book is that Frame does not shirk from sharing his identification with the OPC in the past and the PCA in the present. This would put him in a church denomination with a high value on long-standing tradition and doctrinal accuracy. He is unabashedly “conservative” and Calvinist in his thinking. Theological conservatives seem to get the reputation more than others to bicker about theological differences, be more exclusive, insular-focused, drawing clear fences between us and them, etc.
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