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Every Sigh, the End: A Novel About Zombies Paperback – October 5, 2007

3.3 out of 5 stars 30 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Review

Jason Hornsby's Every Sigh, The End may be the best zombie novel I have read. It feels like a grand truth is peeking through the enigmatic and conspiratorial fog that suffuses the novel. It all seems to mean something... -- Devon Kappa, None May Say

About the Author

Jason S. Hornsby is an honors graduate of the University of South Florida and was once accused of authoring The Perfect Spiral. When not visiting haunted schoolhouses or chasing down the Florida skunk ape, Mr. Hornsby teaches high school English and prepares for the Apocalypse, which he believes will be soon. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 388 pages
  • Publisher: Permuted Press; 2nd edition (October 5, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0978970780
  • ISBN-13: 978-0978970789
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,021,775 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This mind-bending novel by newcomer Jason S. Hornsby is fresher than the flesh of a newly turned zombie.

Hornsby's ideas are the most creative and original to hit the living-dead genre since director Danny Boyle gave us fast and furious zombies in the movie "28 Days Later."

For one thing, Hornsby meshes the apocalypse with reality television, a perfect marriage for the new millenium. For another, he plays with the space/time continuum in a truly chilling way. Protagonist Ross Orringer must fight zombies on soundstages with shifting rooms and bit players who disappear into thin air.

Poor Ross. He knows he can't trust the zombies who surround the house where he's partying on New Year's Eve. But it turns out he can't necessarily trust his closest friends or even his family.

Hornsby's book is confusing at times, frustrating in places, and brilliant throughout, with some truly scary moments. It's one of the most exciting novels I've read in recent months -- and that's all novels, not just zombie novels.

I strongly recommend "Every Sigh, The End" to readers who are willing to get onto this up and coming author's intense and bizarre roller coaster. But I warn you, stand next to the wooden cutout before you do and make sure your "creepy tolerance" is high enough to ride.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I write this review with some trepidation. I almost feel as if the story should be reviewed and analyzed in an English or Literature classroom, or perhaps in some exotic American Philosophy class, rather on a website that sells this book. This is a book that reminds me to look at things a bit differently, to try something new and completely different. It reminds me of stories read in college and high school that I was turned on to not by friends or family that know my tastes but by someone who felt I should try something that would lead me down a different path entirely.

What I write here is for the people who are curious about this book, people who want to see if this book is up their alley. Some of the previous reviews seem of a personal nature perhaps written by folks who know Jason Hornsby. I can say that I definitely do not know the author. I came into the book with no preconcieved notions or presumptions as to what I should expect. I would also say that, after reading this review, if you feel that this book is perhaps not right for you, you might want to reconsider that, as it is certainly a very challenging and intriguing work that might make you think more than you expected.

This book is angry, it is dark, and it is about zombies. But it does not follow any known pathway to completion that I have ever seen in a tale about the undead. The author has completely transcended the genre with a work that is more philosophy and questions our society, our reality, and what we are as individuals than even the works of Romero and other "deep thinkers" of this realm.

Like so many high quality works the zombies here are a tool that is wielded by the author or film maker to force us to look more closely at ourselves.
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Format: Paperback
I'll spare the rehash of the plot, as it is somewhat disappointing in its surfaced cliche-ness and its obvious lack of completion and besides you can find summaries elsewhere on this page.

In a nutshell: Every sigh, the end is a moderately well written book that suffers mainly from the authors inability to remove himself and his issues from the narrative. Now, its true that every piece of art stems from the artist and that the creation's existence demands a creator and blah, blah, blah, but at a certain point the co-mingling becomes tedious. Much like Wes Anderson can not resolve his looming daddy issues, Jason Hornsby can not shake his near paralyzing feelings of immense inadequacy and geek self loathing, as evidenced not just by this book, but by the author's puerile responses to some of his negative reviews on this very site. The result is a muddled blend of horror, pop culture and nihilism all covered by a raw and exposed desire to be oh-so-deep while ignoring the fact that he's merely waist deep in the shallow end. The characters are inconsistent and interchangeable, the plot a meaningless jumble of moments barely strung together by the reappearance of occasionally familiar names.

Its as if Mr. Hornsby has never gotten over the fact that he set out to write the great American novel and ended up with just a zombie book and the sad part of it is: you get the feeling that if he could just get over himself, that he could write something pretty damn good. If he'd just realize that there is nothing wrong with genre work, he might turn out some pretty seminal zombie tales. You can tell that he's familiar with horror and zombies. He can really write some good gore.
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By david on November 15, 2007
Format: Paperback
I love to read and particularly have a sweet spot for zombie fiction. However most follow the same formula: Outbreak occurs, character A is in place X and has to travel a great distance to get to place Y for kid/wife/parent/safety while on the way he encounters zombies/outlaws/survivors and good/bad times occur...writes itself. So when I heard that a new zombie book was coming out and that it took a different approach to the subject I preordered the book.
Then I started reading it.
I understand that the writer is trying to be different, but trying to be different and actually being different are two...well two different things. From the first page I got the feeling that the author was trying to be cool, and that he was trying to make his main character (which he obviously sees as a reflection of himself) cool. And that was the problem with the content and style of this book; it was too busy trying and not actually doing. I am sure the author thinks of himself as this misunderstood loner that is just too cool for the world, and maybe he is and I am reading too much into his writing style. However the ability to conjugate a verb or to attach an adjective to a noun does not make a great writer. Also repeatedly referring to a well known book (Catcher in the Rye) and trying to write in the same vein as that book does not make your book that book.
I know this review is mainly focused on style, but if you are too aware of the style of the book it is difficult to focus on the content. It's like watching a movie with bad acting. No matter what you just cant get over the fact that you are not being taken into the world of the movie, but are rather sitting watching somebody go through the motions of acting in front of a camera.
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