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Showing 1-10 of 43 reviews(Verified Purchases). See all 147 reviews
on May 1, 2016
The book categorized some things that were intuitively known to me but I had not systematized. That video games are more complex,and doing complex things makes us smarter. That tv shows were the same. That interactive challenging screen time is better and more challenging than hours of Facebook. I like it and feel justified in my geekhood.
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on September 21, 2007
The writer's style feels like a a conversation, where he tells about his ideas and some supportive research made by other persons. The lack of references in the text is compensated by a last chapter with comments about hte origin of the data he used to support his claims.
This informal text is what makes the book an easy and enjoyable reading. However, as a scientific result, the book is not completely sound, since his conclusions are based only on what he think is happening and the supportive that is not necessarily correlated with his findings.
Parents, researchers and educators will find the book provocative. Actually, it defends that beyond content, form is also important, and maybe more important when we are talking about the new media (basically TV and games).
As a general reader, it is a very good book. As a position book, it really makes the author's point of view. However, scientific oriented readers will feel something is missing.
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on August 3, 2016
great!!
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on March 3, 2016
Solid book. Intriguing and exciting.
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on July 17, 2016
good
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on December 2, 2013
I thought the arguments were a bit weak. It seemed a bit of a stretch on an interestingly provocative premise.
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on July 26, 2006
This book has a great concept behind it: the idea that all our modern pop culture isn't destroying our minds, but rather making us smarter and teaching us problem solving and social skills.

I found it to be pretty good, although not fantastic. The early parts in which Johnson describes his childhood experiences with baseball games and D&D closely mirrored my own, and I found myself pleasantly reminiscing about those days. I had no real disagreements with any of the arguments he put forth, and overall this book was a well-written and fun read.

However, I was a little disappointed by the depth of it. Johnson goes through modern video gaming and reality TV, and although it's all interesting stuff, I started to feel that he spent a lot of his time repeating myself. That is, he gave examples of the same ideas over and over. While all the examples were effective, it became a tad redundant, and by the end, I was wishing that the book was just denser and deeper, a heavier exploration. Of course, with this subject matter, perhaps it is self-limiting with regards to depth.

It is a good book, but there's just not enough to it to be totally satisfying. This would've probably been better a large essay in a compilation of futurist and modern thought papers. Still, it is a worthwhile read.
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on July 19, 2006
This is a great book, especially to all of those who think that TV, videogames and other media create "brain damage". Johnson demonstrates the virtues of our pop culture, that is actually making us smarter in certain areas.

As a high school teacher, it's demonstrated the importance of the popular media consumed by our modern adolescents and given me a lot of ideas to be able to use the modern mass media in my classroom, and the importance of it's use.

If you think pop culture is damaging our "classic" culture, line Postman (Amusing us to death) or Sartori (Homo videns), read this book.
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on February 8, 2015
Good book. It really makes you think about how we approach education.
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on January 6, 2015
Very intersting Point of View, clearly articulated & fun to read.
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