Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Exchanging Our Country Marks: The Transformation of African Identities in the Colonial and Antebellum South 1st New edition Edition

4.9 out of 5 stars 13 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0807846940
ISBN-10: 0807846945
Why is ISBN important?
ISBN
This bar-code number lets you verify that you're getting exactly the right version or edition of a book. The 13-digit and 10-digit formats both work.
Scan an ISBN with your phone
Use the Amazon App to scan ISBNs and compare prices.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Buy used On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$12.99 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
Buy new On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
$36.82 On clicking this link, a new layer will be open
More Buying Choices
29 New from $35.08 42 Used from $7.89
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Prime Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$36.82 FREE Shipping. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • Exchanging Our Country Marks: The Transformation of African Identities in the Colonial and Antebellum South
  • +
  • Rituals of Resistance: African Atlantic Religion in Kongo and the Lowcountry South in the Era of Slavery
Total price: $58.32
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

With its legacy of brutality and of the horrific overseas passage, the transatlantic slave trade may be imagined as the kidnapping of Africans without regard to nationality or ethnicity. Based on his research, however, Michael A. Gomez suggests that Africans, upon arriving in America, were dispersed much more closely along ethnic and cultural lines than previously acknowledged. The underlying theme of his provocative work, Exchanging Our Country Marks, is that while blacks eventually replaced their African ethnic identities with new racial ones after arriving in the American South, they retained much of their original cultures far longer than was originally suspected. Some of his most interesting evidence of this comes in the form of runaway-slave advertisements, which identified the slaves by their ethnic roots ("Dinah, an Ebo wench that speaks very good English"). By scrutinizing ex-slave narratives, stories, music, and even the location and nature of slave rebellions, Gomez pieces together a genealogy of blacks in the American South, attempting to examine their notions of identity. Of course, much is based on significant speculation, a fact that only underscores the difficulty of such scholarship. Gomez manages to present a wide range of information clearly as he expands on a wealth of recent research regarding the slave trade and the history of blacks in America, making Exchanging Our Country Marks a vast and creative exploration of African identity in the United States from 1526 to 1830.

Review

Deeply researched in both African and North American sources.

"nternational Journal of African Historical Studies"

[A] rare and creative inquiry into the origins of African identity in the United States from 1526 to 1830.

"Gaither Reporter"

[A] conceptual "tour de force." No brief review can do justice to the nuances and complexities of Gomez's argument.

"Southern Cultures"

Gomez has yoked his admirable grasp of recent advances in African historiography with a subtle and sensitive reading of slavery.

"American Historical Review"

"Gomez gracefully and distinctively enlivens slavesU understandings of themselves as Igbo, Muslims, parents, children, and--eventually--UAfricansU and Americans.

"Journal of Southern History""

ÝA¨ rare and creative inquiry into the origins of African identity in the United States from 1526 to 1830.

"Gaither Reporter"

ÝA¨ conceptual "tour de force." No brief review can do justice to the nuances and complexities of Gomez's argument.

"Southern Cultures"

[A] conceptual "tour de force," No brief review can do justice to the nuances and complexities of Gomez's argument.

"Southern Cultures"

[A] conceptual "tour de force". No brief review can do justice to the nuances and complexities of Gomez's argument.

"Southern Cultures"

Gomez gracefully and distinctively enlivens slaves understandings of themselves as Igbo, Muslims, parents, children, and--eventually-- Africans and Americans.

"Journal of Southern History"

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press; 1st New edition edition (March 30, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807846945
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807846940
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #420,970 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

There are no customer reviews yet.
5 star
4 star
3 star
2 star
1 star
Share your thoughts with other customers

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Exchanging Our Country Marks: The Transformation of African Identities in the Colonial and Antebellum South
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: Exchanging Our Country Marks: The Transformation of African Identities in the Colonial and Antebellum South