Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 9 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The 7 Experiment - Bible ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Unbeatable customer service, and we usually ship the same or next day. Over one million satisfied customers!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The 7 Experiment - Bible Study Book: Staging Your Own Mutiny Against Excess Paperback – December 3, 2012

4.6 out of 5 stars 1,072 customer reviews

See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, December 3, 2012
$19.37
$11.18 $2.41

Uninvited: Living Loved When You Feel Less Than, Left Out, and Lonely by Lysa TerKeurst
Uninvited
The popular new release from Lysa TerKeurst. Learn more
$19.37 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 9 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover

Frequently Bought Together

  • The 7 Experiment - Bible Study Book: Staging Your Own Mutiny Against Excess
  • +
  • Interrupted: When Jesus Wrecks Your Comfortable Christianity
  • +
  • For the Love: Fighting for Grace in a World of Impossible Standards
Total price: $41.68
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

Review

“Jen Hatmaker is a model for her experiment in radical obedience to Christ. May we all be as committed to Jesus’ Gospel revolution.”
— Richard Stearns, president of World Vision US, author of The Hole in Our Gospel --This text refers to the Unknown Binding edition.

About the Author

Jen Hatmaker and her family live in Austin, Texas, where the city motto is “Keep Austin Weird,” and they work hard to do their part. Jen’s eight previous books include Interrupted and A Modern Girl’s Guide to Bible Study. She and her husband planted Austin New Church in an economically and ethnically diverse, socially unique, urban area of the city in 2008. They are in the great- est adventure of their lives, (thrilled to find out where they have planted is known as the “church planters graveyard”) and have made some incredible new partnerships in ministry. They’ve seen their world turned upside down as they’ve considered what it means to ask God how to live and not just what to do. But it’s a good upside down, as part of that discovery will be the addition of two children from Ethiopia set to join the three they already have. Together they will keep Austin weird and seek to glorify God as they do.

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: LifeWay Press (December 3, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1415874182
  • ISBN-13: 978-1415874189
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,072 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #512,166 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I was excited to read this book, but quickly disappointed. A former church planter's wife, I no longer travel in "Christian Life" circles, largely because of my unease with this style of celebrity spiritualist. I felt uncomfortable with her talk of "The Council" which I can imagine from experience, as a euphemism for a hip, modern church gal clique who are may be well meaning but often gossip through prayer requests and leave other women of their church feeling left out of their intimacy. That unease aside, I forged on hoping for something genuine and deeper. I did not find it. The whole book feels shallow and sophomoric in its attempt to be chatty and cool (or "weird" as she says often) and left me feeling I was listening to a teen youth group leader. I am not a young mom anymore, but by no means old and remember being turned off by this style of Faith when my own life was consumed by yound kids and full time ministry. Never having heard of Mrs. Hatmaker, I explored her website and other press which left me with the same superficiality that most "look at us" faith leaders give me. Not sure TV shows and glowing webpages on humility and simplicity make sense---God seems to call us to something quieter and still. This book is a good premise for a spiritual quest but the author is not the person to lead it for me...Perhaps I need someone more experienced, whose life more solidly delivers the lessons she seeks to impart. This felt temporary and honestly, trite.
Comment 59 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I was so intrigued by this book when I found it. Jen is funny and real, and I hoped her experiences would help me have courage to begin massively simplifying...but I only got through the first section before putting it down and hoping the money I spent on it went to a good cause. Here's why (spoiler alert). On Day 6, the author describes her children throwing out most of their meal because there was no ketchup. I've been there, weeping for my children's detachment from the suffering and hunger in the "rest of the world," their flippant wastefulness. I, too, have an overstocked pantry with nothing to eat. But then on Day 17, she describes being at a restaurant and sending back a plate of spinach because it was tossed in vinaigrette. All I could think of was the subject's mother in C.S. Lewis's "The Screwtape Letters" eschewing a tea her host had thoughtfully prepared for the driest toast. Did she not note the hypocrisy? Two meals ruined, and for what? A condiment?? She should know the dressed salad wound up exactly where her children placed their dry fish. There was no weeping over this waste. I read to the end of the section to see if she recognized the near idolatry of fastidiously adhering to her chosen seven food items, especially in situations where she had little control, but to no avail. I was generous to give three stars, optimistically hoping the remaining book had merit, and in my belief the author's intentions were good.
1 Comment 68 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This book has been going around book clubs and blog circles for a while now with nearly unanimous positive reviews, yet I was very disappointed by what I found when I picked it up myself.

Mrs. Hatmaker and her friends are clearly passionate, well-intentioned people. Their church focuses on helping the homeless and disenfranchised, many of them are adopting African orphans, and her intentions in the starting this experiment were good.

But honestly I came away from the book mystified, disappointed and having failed to connect. Most of the drama that drove the book was the sole by-product of the author's refusal to plan anything (ever) and compulsive spending habits. She's sadly blasé about the simple things she doesn't know and doesn't consider important to learn (case in point, whether watermelons grow on bushes, vines or stems). It's also hard to be empathetic when so much of what she does either contradicts previous chapters or makes you question other content (if they were so desperately poor early in their marriage, why does she have so few skills in area like reducing waste, careful shopping, and basic mending of clothing in house?). It somewhat strained believability that someone who writes and researches for a living and lives in a notoriously "earthy crunchy" city was only just learning about (and terribly shocked by) the mess of industrialized food, incessant media onslaught, and the perils of vast over-consumption.

Perhaps most frustrating was the reality that she didn't actually learn any new skills or make permanent lifestyle changes. She fasted from things for a set period of time, setting arbitrary rules that fit nicely with the theme of "7" but weren't necessarily related to best practices, long-term growth or sometimes even basic logic.
Read more ›
19 Comments 634 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Devan on September 13, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
I expected a book that discussed minimalism as a way to connect with God. However, what I got was a lot of humble-bragging and complaining.

The author did 7 "fasts" from things like waste, electronics, clothes, food, etc. I did not see the purpose of the fasts other than that she could write a book about them. For instance, she chose to eat 7 foods for one month. I do not see how this was supposed to help her connect with God or lead a simpler life. She spent the whole chapter complaining about the food and hardly mentions God.

Moreover, she would spend a month de-cluttering her home and wearing only a few pieces of clothing. The next month she would talk about what she bought when she went shopping. She also took a month off from eating out, but spent the whole chapter talking about how she couldn't wait to eat out 4-5 times a week again.

The author also spends a majority of the book talking about all of the extreme Christian things she does like feeding the poor and adopting orphans. It felt like she was wanting to sound humble, but was really just bragging (i.e. humble-bragging). Plus she seems to think that those things matter more than the day to day small things. I think that attitude affected her ability to use her fasts to truly connect with God and alter her life. She fails to recognize that some Christians make a big difference through small actions. Although it is great that she helps in big ways on occasion, it is also ok to help in small ways all the time.

Finally, the author spend a very large chunk of the book talking about her thoughts on what it means to be "green". She clearly has no idea what she is talking about (e.g. when she suggests not buying GMO meat. She clearly is unaware that there is no such thing as GMO meat).
Read more ›
Comment 35 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The 7 Experiment - Bible Study Book: Staging Your Own Mutiny Against Excess
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The 7 Experiment - Bible Study Book: Staging Your Own Mutiny Against Excess

Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: bibles zondervan