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Comment: Some shelfwear to outer cover/may have name inside/ or stray markings and some highlighting /inscription. Tightly bound copy
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Explorers: SF Adventures to Far Horizons Paperback – April 8, 2000

4.4 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Gardner Dozois, editor of Asimov's and the annual anthology series, The Year's Best Science Fiction, has assembled 23 stories by some of the best-known names in SF, past and present. The stories, which "explore the farthest reaches of the universe," were written between 1951 and 1998 and are presented in chronological order. As the stories progress, so does the terrain being explored.

"The Sentinel," a classic Arthur C. Clarke tale of a man discovering an alien artifact on the moon (the inspiration for 2001: A Space Odyssey), shows the quintessential explorer of the time: alone, in charge of his environment, and happy that way. "Grandpa," by James H. Schmitz, concerns the indomitable spirit of Man, or at least Boy, and his natural lordship over all things alien. In Niven's "Becalmed in Hell," we meet a cyborg, and Zelazny introduces us to a population genetically engineered to the edge of humanity in "The Keys to December." Le Guin's story, "Vaster Than Empires and More Slow," suggests that in order to explore alien territory, you must be insane. Tiptree's piece, "The Man Who Walked Home," is a brilliant portrayal of the tension between the need to explore the unknown, and the human cost of that need. Stories by Varley and Swanwick, Baxter and Egan, show humans from an alien perspective: we are no longer the sum and center of the universe, merely a part.

While it is possible to read this book as nothing more than a collection of adventure stories leavened with a pinch of a sense of wonder, a deeper reading reveals how the genre's gaze has turned from an examination of what lies Out There, the unknown place and the alien being, to a more inward contemplation: the question of what it is to be human. --Luc Duplessis.

Review

"The most imaginative editor in the field."--The Village Voice

"Dozois is to the 1980s and 1990s what John W. Campbell, Jr., was to the 1940s and 1950s-the finest editor in the world of short SF."-Publishers Weekly
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 464 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; 1st edition (April 8, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312254628
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312254629
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1.3 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,494,826 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This anthology gives the reader a chance to see how "space travel" science fiction has evolved through five decades. The 23 stories are in chronological order based on their respective publishing dates. They are samplings from the 1950's-1990's. Each selection is prefaced with a short introduction to why it was included. If you like old-fashioned science fiction, the kind I remember from the 65 cent paperbacks I saved up my allowance for, then this is for you. Open it and settle down for a few trips to places you only dreamed about when you were young and innocent.
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Format: Paperback
This is a collection that will never fail you. I've only had it for one day, and already I've missed a night's sleep reading some of the greatest writers to ever put pen to paper. I particularly liked that the editor didn't just stop with the early seventies, but re-printed some of the good old stuff from writers like Clarke. A real edition to your library, and something I cannot recommend too highly.
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Format: Paperback
Anthologist emeritus does it again with a suberb anthology of short stories and novelletes about spaces and exploring
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Format: Paperback
Gardner Dozois collected a bunch of science fiction adventure stories about exploration, ranging from classic stories from the golden age of science fiction to modern stories from the most recent pages of Asimov's science fiction. I loved it.
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Format: Paperback
In the opening story of Explorers, astronauts exploring the surface of the Moon discover a strange monolith planted there by an ancient space-faring civilization. The story is "The Sentinel" by Arthur C. Clarke, a much-anthologized classic that inspired Stanley Kubrick's film 2001: A Space Odyssey. The monolith is, unwittingly, an apt metaphor for this book, which is not so much a collection of science-fiction stories as it is a monument to a genre that is rapidly losing oxygen to the cold, dark vacuum of space.
SF magazines, virtually the only print source for new short fiction and reviews, are losing readers if not going out of business altogether (Science Fiction Age, for example, ceased publication with its May issue). SF book publishing, meanwhile, is awash in so-called "media novels" based on movies, television, comic books, and computer and role-playing games. The genre has become so littered with space junk that many of its first-rank authors are taking an escape pod: writing novels with SF themes but marketing them as mainstream fiction.
So at a time when science fiction needs to be looking to its future and a new aesthetic, books like this one are dwelling on its past and embracing outdated forms. Gardner Dozois has assembled a so-so collection of stories and packaged them with his usual erudite introductions, but he isn't blazing any new trails here. His selections are almost equally balanced between old masters from the Golden Age of SF, many of them near-forgotten (H.B. Fyfe, James H. Schmitz, Cordwainer Smith), and later writers who published the bulk of their work after SF's New Wave (stardate 1967): Ursula K. Le Guin, John Varley, Stephen Baxter. Longtime fans, of course, will encounter much familiar material here. For a new generation of SF readers, Explorers will serve as a reminder of the glory that once was--and, with change, could be again.
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