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Faces in the Pool: A Lovejoy Mystery (Lovejoy Mysteries) by [Gash, Jonathan]
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Faces in the Pool: A Lovejoy Mystery (Lovejoy Mysteries) Kindle Edition

3.2 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Length: 341 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In Gash's jaunty 24th Lovejoy mystery to feature the crooked East Anglian antiques expert with a weakness for women (after 2004's The Ten Word Game), Lovejoy accepts an offer of early release from prison on condition he work for a speed-dating service run by Laura Moon, a wealthy divorcée. Part of the deal, he soon learns, is to wed Laura in a ploy to bring her ex-husband, a confidence trickster, out of hiding. Lovejoy agrees, but before the ink is dry on the marriage register, a couple of his friends suffer fatal accidents. The rambling plot involves white tribes, people who control fortunes in old jewels and curios that could potentially flood the antiques market. While Gash makes the British slang easy to follow for American readers and throws in plenty of authentic antiques lore, this dated tale with its often grating protagonist is unlikely to win the author many new fans. (Dec.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

'Effortlessly entertaining, as ever' Crime Time

Product Details

  • File Size: 626 KB
  • Print Length: 341 pages
  • Publisher: Minotaur Books; First Edition edition (December 8, 2009)
  • Publication Date: December 8, 2009
  • Sold by: Macmillan
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004TNH6RO
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #507,078 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
When his antique scam failed, Lovejoy is sent to prison for his con. However, Ellen Jaynor, owner of The Anglers Manglers Speed-Datery offers to get him out of jail immediately if he agrees to marry temporarily millionaire Laura Moon. In fact Laura wants Lovejoy to find her former spouse, but he smells a rat in which he will be left holding the crap when the ex is killed.

His apprentice Lydia and his son Mortimer persuade him to at least attend the antiques convention of the sixteen groups representing the world's Lost Tribes. They want him to authenticate their antiques. However, nothing goes right as Mortimer is kidnapped and the edifice storing the artifacts is burned to the ground. However, the worst is watching his beloved sail off into the sunset with her lover and the booty from the Lost Tribes' valuables. Jail seems safer.

The story line is all over the place as Jonathan Gash proves chaos theory can be fun to read inside a crime caper. The cast is strong as Lovejoy is his usual roguish self as nothing is quite what it seems or goes right. Not for everyone as the dots don't connect in a simple easy to follow way as B does not follow A, or precede C; fans who enjoy mass pandemonium will want to read convoluted Faces in the Pool.

Harriet Klausner
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've read bad reviews for this book. I suppose there are critical people everywhere, but like all of Gash's Lovejoy mysteries, this one starts the hilarity on page one and it never stops. Who doesn't love the scruffy, incompetent, larcenous and endearing character? Gash can get more into a sentence than other writers can squeeze into two paragraphs.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I've read all of the earlier Lovejoy novels and had seen reviews about the difficulty in following the plot.
I have to admit - I found this one difficult to follow. I would not recommend this for newcomers to the series.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
One of the best characters in modern fiction. Lovejoy is the bomb! A Lovejoy mystery is the best, fun fun and more fun! Jonathan Gash writes rings around the others. Thank you Jonathan. I have read all the Lovejoy books, waiting for more.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I am a big Lovejoy fan (everyone interested in antiques should be a fan) and was glad to see this come out after the Ten Word Game in 2001. Far too long - even the local book chain stopped carrying the series. The author was off on the Clare Burtonall mysteries, which I haven't read, so am not sure of his artistic development over the years. The new Lovejoy book is a mystery in itself. Somehow it reminds me of the 'A Series of Unfortunate Events' books, where every single character without exception switches back and forth in their morality, so you are left wondering exactly what morality really means. In Faces in the Pool, Lovejoy is so completely used then abandoned, back and forth for most of the book that I wonder if there is any humanity left in any of the characters, even the familiar ones from years past. But I want to see more of Lovejoy, especially in his new situation of responsibility set up at the very end of the book. I'd ask the author not to quit this character, but to show us how he copes with the historic past, modern technology, and economics. Don't leave me thinking that East Anglia will never catch up.
It would be really interesting to see Tinker come straight - why he hasn't died of alcoholism by now is another mystery. It's depressing and frankly, a bit tiresome.
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Format: Hardcover
Art is always a balance between competing factors: familiar enough to be comfortable, yet challenging enough to be interesting. Rarely is that balance as apparent as it is here, in Jonathan Gash's Faces in the Pool.

Characters jump into conversations when you didn't even know they were present in the scene. Entire plot lines are not only unresolved, but also unexplained. And the language is peppered with obscure and opaque terms that can't be found in any dictionary I'm aware of (even with the term definitions that precede each chapter).

This makes reading the novel awkward and disorienting. The question is: does this make the reading interesting enough to compensate for that confusion? The main character, Lovejoy, is off-balance, unsure of his role in the story and buffeted by other characters who always seem to know more about what is going on than him. The cloudy form of the narrative serves to give you, the reader, insight into Lovejoy's confusion by making you equally hazy about the events of the story.

In the end though, the storytelling is so disjointed, oblique, and nebulous that the reader is prevented from enjoying the redeeming aspects of the novel: the roguish characters, the displaced expatriates, and the antiques. I enjoy a challenging read if there's a payoff that makes it worthwhile. Here, I get the feeling the read is challenging simply due to the author's boredom or vanity.
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By Dolly Field on December 5, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have always loved Jonathan Gash and Lovejoy. I was really excited to see this book on kindle. I must have started the book over 3 times trying to figure out what was going on. I never did figure it out. I plugged away - convinced that by the end it would all come together. I got to the end and remained as confused as I had been all along. It makes me feel really stupid to say this but - I still don't know why any of the dozens of characters in the book did anything that they did!
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