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The Factory World by [Ryan, Joseph Edward]
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The Factory World Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 9 customer reviews

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Length: 312 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
Page Flip: Enabled

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Product Details

  • File Size: 3179 KB
  • Print Length: 312 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Steam Press (November 16, 2013)
  • Publication Date: November 16, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00DV88WO4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,418,607 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is a very original story where a little boy suddenly finds himself in a new world -- he doesn't know why he's there or what the place is about, and the reader is in the dark too, so it's really interesting to look around with him for details and hope. He befriends a coarse cowboy-ish character who has been deposited there as well, and they rely on each other as trek across this strange world of holes, machinery, and possible clues -- the surroundings perfectly described by the author to paint a clear picture.
Their journey is grim and confusing, but the story still manages to be engrossing and charming.
I loved this book because I absolutely never knew where it was heading, and that's a great escape.
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Format: Kindle Edition
The Factory World is a novel written by New Zealand author Joseph Edward Ryan and follows (literally) a ten year old boy Simon through a derelict and broken world.
The story is a simple journey. Simon and his friend, the Tin Man, must journey through this world of ruin and decay to try and find a way home. We learn of the world with Simon. We are experiencing his journey. There is no base experience to leverage off. Everything is strange and foreign and this is what absorbs you as a reader. You need to learn what is over the next wall. You need to make sure that Simon and the Tin Man escape the current horror, only to face more down the path.
The prose is simple but this is befitting a ten year old protagonist and doesn’t get in the way of the story. No fancy similes or metaphors, just good old fashioned hardworking words that keep you moving through episodic adventures, each of which increases simon’s and our understanding, through to the grand finale.
Normally a journey story is about the milieu, about the world you are discovering, but this story is not just about the place, it’s about the characters’ growth as he explores the place, learning more about himself and what he can do. They two don’t get in each other’s way or feel tacked onto the story. They are naturally woven together and seeing the relationship between Simon and Tin Man blossom is a true treasure.
Joseph is either a Lee Child fan or has some intimate knowledge of suspense. On a macro scale and a micro scale. The major question is never actually answered (more on this later) but minor questions are continually posed and the answers are mesmerising and terrifying, made more terrifying by the nature that they are only half answers.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is a competently written story, reminiscent of Philip Pullman. The characters are engaging and the descriptions evocative. There is some occasional clumsiness where the author hasn't carefully thought events through, but on the whole it was an enjoyable read.
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Format: Paperback
The Factory World is very similar to Stephen King’s Dark Tower series, Tad Williams’ Otherland series, or the screen adaptation of Mutant Chronicles. With dark and gritty tones, vivid and unsettling imagery, a mixture of science fiction, fantasy and horror elements and a milieu-based story structure, The Factory World draws inspiration from thirty years of slipstream cross-genre novels.

Ten year old Simon wakes up in an outflow pipe in an abandoned factory in a dark and strange world, where purple meteors rain down and scour deep black holes through the earth. He is dressed in a Lion costume from a play of The Wizard of Oz and meets a nameless stranger whom he calls The Tin Man. Together, they roam an eerie and ominous world and encounter strange and terrifying creatures and wondrous technologies, all in the search for a way to return home.

The post-apocalyptic fantasy setting immediately felt like I was reading Stephen King’s The Gunslinger, and as the Wizard of Oz elements started showing up I felt like I was reading King’s Wizard And Glass. Normally, it would be a compliment to be compared to something as epic and masterful as Stephen King’s magnum opus, but in this instance Ryan falls flat. The author’s voice and ideas are lost in the comparison to King; The Factory World is too similar and disappears beneath the shadow of a greater work. Ryan’s world has many brilliant ideas and concepts which are unfortunately often glossed over when they should have been expanded; despite the vivid and fantastic imagination the world lacks a critical depth that makes it feel real and cohesive.

For the rest of this review, and for more reviews and author interviews, visit my blog [...] and follow me on Twitter for news and updates [...]
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
After getting an Amazon gift card I bought this on Christmas day after doing random searches through the "books received" section of the SF Signal website. I downloaded a sample and I was hooked.

Firstly, this is not some dodgy paid review, and I don't know the author. It's a sad world where I feel the need to preface a review of a small-press book with that disclaimer, but there's so much self-promotion in the small-press/self-publishing arena that it kind of has to be said.

Now, this book is not perfect, but what it does do it does very well. I remember reading these SF adventure paperbacks as a kid, and they had this sense of wonder and adventure, a sense of exploration and discovery. While The Factory World contains a darker streak than those pulp novels of my youth, it has that same sense of forward momentum and discovery. Coupled with this is very deft dialogue. The story has echoes of "The Road", although Cormac McCarthy's masterpiece is both darker and more complete. However, given that The Road won the Pulitzer, I'm hardly dissing this novel.

On an emotional level this novel affected me in a way that few novels can these days. I guess the author just hit the right buttons in that regard. It hits many of the same notes that I found in The Road. I don't want to give too much of the novel away, because I think I was lucky in that I read this story effectively blind, without any idea at all what it was about.

The writing style is clean and fairly sparse, but words and descriptions are all well chosen.

Where The Factory World didn't quite work for me was that I would have preferred a more robust ending. I was left with a few too many questions come the end.
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