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Families of Ghana [NON-US FORMAT, PAL]

4.7 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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(Nov 30, 2015)
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Editorial Reviews

Deborah lives with twelve extended family members in a family compound in a rural village in southern Ghana. The 8-year-old is up at 5:30 in the morning to finish washing dishes, sweeping, and carrying water before she leaves for school. After school, she and her sisters make fufu, her father’s favorite food, and we visit the colorful local market. In Accra, Ghana’s capital, ten-year-old Emmanuel lives with his sister, mother, father and aunt. We follow him to school and to a funeral where he serves as an altar boy. We see colorful coffins in shapes that are meaningful to the person who has died, such as a fish for a fisherman, a banana for a farmer, and an airplane for someone who always wanted to fly.

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Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Families of Ghana
  • Directors: Eleanor Marquisee
  • Producers: Master Communications
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: Travelvideostore.com
  • DVD Release Date: November 30, 2015
  • Run Time: 22 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000AOEPPW
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #208,425 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

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I thought J. Hall's review was useful and on point, though a bit preoccupied with the status of the two families whose lives are shown in *Families of Ghana.* This series---part of the *Families of the World* programs about elementary- and middle-school-aged kids from many countries---makes every effort to be representative and fair to each country and culture it profiles. I think this video is no exception.
The kids who watched this video with me had questions about the differences between our lives in the States and those of Deborah and Emmanuel, but they were savvy enough to pick up on some of the concerns that J. Hall had. Maybe that's why I can give this review a rating of 5 out of 5 stars with confidence. I think the story lines work.

I enjoyed learning about Deborah and Emmanuel's lives, and so did the other folks who watched this video with me. Some of the videos in this series might show the lives of families that are more "average" than others, but I've found each video to be engaging, fun, informative, and equally engrossing for others who've enjoyed them with me. And the quality of the video production is first rate, which is not always the case with videos designed with educational purposes in mind. They are also a treat for my ESL students, both adults and kids, because the narration is easy to follow and clearly tied to what the viewer is seeing.

If you want to watch clips of each part of this video, go to YouTube and search for "Families of Ghana (Families of the World)---Rural Trailer" (to learn about Deborah's life) and "Urban Trailer" (to learn about Emmanuel's).
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Format: DVD
This Ghana program is part of a series on many different countries. In each program, there are two segments (about 15 minutes each) showing two different famlies of the country: one urban and one rural. Each segment is narrated by a child of that family. The children narrating the series range in age from 5 to 11 (in the ones I've seen). The Ghana program is narrated by an 8-year-old and a 10-year-old. Overall, I think it's a very good series. I use several of the programs in my 7th grade world geography classroom.

My only concern about this series is that the families chosen are not economically representative of their countries. This gives viewers a skewed idea of what like is like for the average person in the various countries. If you compare the belongings and lifestyles of these families with those shown in the book/CD "Material World," you will see how well off these families are, compared to others in their country. They tend to be upper middle class (by their relative countries' standards).

But in the Ghana DVD, even the relatively wealthy famiy of the countryside was faced with challenges that got my attention. The rural family had no electricity, no running water, slept on mats on the floor, and lived in what appeared to me to be very primitive living conditions. But I could tell they were relatively well-off because they could afford the uniforms for school (including shoes) which some other kids could not; dad runs his own trucking company and has employees; dad also owns the property/compound shown in the program as well as a "house at the farm" where his other wife and kids live; they had plenty to eat throughout the day.

By comparison, the urban family has a fairly cushy life.
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