Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Only 2 left in stock.
Sold by MorningStar2 and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
Fargo (Remastered Edition... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Trade in your item
Get up to a $1.01
Gift Card.
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$19.20
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: BLgroupliquidations
Add to Cart
$19.20
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Fulfillment Express US
Add to Cart
$20.00
& FREE Shipping on eligible orders. Details
Sold by: Electronix-Depot

Fargo (Remastered Edition) [Blu-ray]

4.3 out of 5 stars 2,191 customer reviews

Additional Multi-Format options Edition Discs
Price
New from Used from
Multi-Format
(May 12, 2009)
"Please retry"
No enhanced packaging
1
$6.63 $4.19
Multi-Format
(Apr 01, 2014)
"Please retry"
Remastered Edition
1
$15.38
$12.43 $2.66
Multi-Format
(Aug 03, 2010)
"Please retry"
2
Watch Instantly with Rent Buy

Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime
Unlimited Streaming with Amazon Prime Start your 30-day free trial to stream thousands of movies & TV shows included with Prime. Start your free trial
$15.38 & FREE Shipping on orders over $49. Details Only 2 left in stock. Sold by MorningStar2 and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • Fargo (Remastered Edition) [Blu-ray]
  • +
  • The Big Lebowski [Blu-ray]
  • +
  • No Country For Old Men [Blu-ray + Digital]
Total price: $35.45
Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

This story of a crime gone wrong unravels when a Minneapolis car salesman, Jerry Lundegaard has his wife kidnapped by two thugs. The idea is that the ransom will be paid by the wife's wealthy father, Wade Gustafson, paying the thugs a small portion and keeping the rest to satisfy Jerry's debts. The story draws to a head with the characters converging. Wade Gustafson confronting the kidnappers, aiming to save his daughter; his son-in-law aiming to stop him; and Police Chief Gunderson aiming to solve a murder whose connection to the staged kidnapping gradually becomes clear.

Product Details

  • Format: Multiple Formats, AC-3, Blu-ray, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English (DTS 5.1), French (DTS 5.1), Spanish (DTS 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: French, Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    R
    Restricted
  • Studio: 20th Century Fox
  • DVD Release Date: April 1, 2014
  • Run Time: 99 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2,191 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00HZN8S9U
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,456 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Of all the Cohen Brother's tremendously entertaining movies, this is the best. This is the one that they will be remembered for. William H. Macy plays Jerry Lundegaard, a man in a spot. He's a used car salesman that has been securing loans for cars that are not really in his lot. The bank is calling in the loans, threatening legal action, and he needs money fast. He forms a plan to have his own wife kidnapped, thereby splitting the ransom money between himself and the kidnappers.
It's a terrible plan, and it quickly unravels into a bloody mess of murder and betrayal. When bodies begin to mount, a local police officer, Marge Gunderson, is called in. Frances McDormand plays Marge Gunderson, and she makes the movie magical.
McDormand won an Oscar for the role, and this is one instance when the recipient deserved the award. She plays "Margie" with a huge dose of humanity. She is a character that sneaks up on you. When she is introduced, you wonder if perhaps she is just a small town officer in way over her head. She is pregnant, speaks in small town (Minnesota) idioms, and throws up from morning sickness when investigating the first brutal murders. She seems more like a nice, Minnesotan housewife than a cop. But early you get the feeling that there is something special about her.
The killings involve a traffic cop that was killed while issuing a ticket for a missing plate. In his log book, he was written DLR. When Marge's fellow officer says that he has run a search for all tags starting with DLR, Marge says gently, "I'm not sure I agree with you 100 percent on your police work there, Irv." She explains to Irv that DLR means that it was a new car, a dealer's car. "Oooh" says Irv, staring into space.
Read more ›
18 Comments 193 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
I put Fargo up there with the best. The Coens are young and productive, so it will be interesting to see what they come up with in their careers. They'll have a hard time topping Fargo. Some things I like about it...

--The way they mix violence with humor (not just gross-out easy laughs). Buscemi's reaction to Stormare shooting the cop is funny in a twisted way... but Stormare going after the young couple immediately after is scary and unsettling. This one scene sets the tone of the whole movie.

--Buscemi's reaction to Presnell's refusal to deal is funny...but Buscemi's reaction to being shot is also funny, and is also scary.

--Marge Gunderson feeling nauseated when she sees the mess at the crime scene...and it's just morning sickness. This brief moment really establishes her character.

--Marge Gunderson's relationship with her husband is really endearing, and is a thread that runs throughout the movie. It gives the movie a lot more humanity that most Coen films have.

--And Bill Macy; his character is so earnest and so out of his depth.

Fargo is a movie that stands up to repeated watching.

The DVD transfer is first-rate
Comment 46 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Having owned Fargo both on laserdisc and DVD, watching the Blu-ray transfer projected onto a 200 inch screen is like experiencing the film for the first time at the cinema. If not reference quality (this was a low-budget, independant production), the picture and detail are vastly improved compared to any previous home video presentation - the blood really gushes out of the screen. One can now actually see all the unsavoury goings-on in all the murky interior scenes. There is a lot of film grain visible, so thankfully little or no digital noise reduction applied here. The aspect ratio and framing are correct and the sound and dialogue are much clearer than on the very thin-sounding DVD. There are minor edge-enhancement gripes, as other reviewers have pointed out: halos around black objects placed against white backgrounds (see the opening titles, or the lamp posts in Gunderson's car lot) - but this shouldn't prevent any film fanatic from shredding the DVD in the wood-chipper and upgrading to this version.

Edit: The picture transfer on the remastered blu-ray released April 2014 is even better! The edge-enhancement halos are now gone and even more detail is visible in the darker scenes. The sound is the same and there are no new extras.
2 Comments 42 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
The Coen brothers' new show starts off in a bare little bar outside of Fargo, N.D. A dark plot is being hatched. The conspirators seem confused, antagonistic, none-too-bright. Soon we leave the bar and the title city, never to return for the rest of the movie.
So, why is the movie called "Fargo"? Maybe it's because that's where chaos starts. For the next 98 minutes, we watch a hapless, smiley, terminally nervous Minneapolis car salesman, Jerry Lundegaard (William H. Macy), try to settle some debts by engineering the kidnapping of his docile wife and wangling a ransom from his millionaire father-in-law. This scheme blows up in his face after he hires the wrong thugs in Fargo: Steve Buscemi as motormouth Carl Showalter and Peter Stormare as taciturn Gaear Grimsrud. The error soon results in a triple murder, with more deaths to come.
And we also watch local super-sleuth Marge Gunderson (Frances McDormand), the very pregnant police chief of the Minnesota town of Brainerd, as she relentlessly tracks them down.
"Fargo" may be taken from life -- somewhere -- but it also carries us back to the land of the Coen brothers, the deadpan jokesters of "Blood Simple," "Miller's Crossing" and "Barton Fink." It's a bizarre American terrain where killers, goofballs, ordinary people, amoral businessmen and sleazy lawyers race around like mice in a maze, or rats in a trap.
Like "Blood Simple," "Fargo" is a tale of a murder scheme unraveling at the seams. Yet there's a difference. The Coens are native Minnesotans, and here they guide us back into the territory of their youth, a region they know from life more than movies. The results are both gruesome and scintillating. This is one of the smartest American movies of the young year.
Read more ›
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse



What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Customers Also Watched on Amazon Video