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Fate Of Nations

4.6 out of 5 stars 65 customer reviews

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Audio CD, March 20, 2007
$16.49 $5.11
Vinyl, 1993
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$399.98

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Editorial Reviews

In celebration of Robert Plant's post-Led Zeppelin career, Fate of Nations has been remastered and expanded. Featuring a cooler, quieter sound, tapping Plant's love for folk music, this album includes stand-out hits "29 Palms," "I Believe," and "Come Into My Lfe." Five bonus tracks feature acoustic versions of "Dark Moon" and "Great Spirit."
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (March 20, 2007)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Rhino
  • ASIN: B000I0SGRG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #107,582 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By M. Bauer on March 22, 2007
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I've always thought this disc is one of Robert Plant's best solo efforts (Dreamland and Mighty Rearranger are great too). It all came together on "Fate of Nations": Plant's voice, Eastern influences, guitar power chords, great hooks, wonderful melodies....

The remastered version is worth picking up, even if you have the earlier version of the CD. The biggest reason for me is the improved sound. Plant's voice gains clarity, great separation in the guitar parts, an added punch that was missing on the original release. In addition, there are some good bonus tracks, and amazon's price is great.

Highest of recommendations
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Format: Audio CD
Fate of Nations, Robert Plant's sixth studio album, was released in 1993. The songwriting is solid, the musicianship is skilled, and the sound quality is worthy. The material is in a pop rock musical direction. The 11 tracks have an earthy sound. In comparison with the guitar work, keyboards are used to a lesser extent. Plant does well with the vocals. He also performs a cover of the Tim Hardin tune "If I Were a Carpenter." Though I like all the songs, the ones I enjoy the most are "I Believe," "The Greatest Gift," and "Great Spirit." The skillfully tailored "I Believe," one of my favorite compositions from Plant, is pretty. The well-crafted piece "The Greatest Gift" displays an impressive beginning which consists of resonating guitar playing and a nice string arrangement. "Great Spirit" is melodious. "Calling to You"--the opening cut--is textured, exotic, and features attractive violin work. The pleasant "Come into My Life" exhibits smooth, charming female backing vocals. The CD booklet includes the song lyrics to only "Great Spirit" and the closing track "Network News." Information is given on who plays and what is played on the cuts. Environmental data with four corresponding color photos are included. There is a black-and-white photo of Plant. Two identical color illustrations, one on the backcover of the CD booklet and the other on the back of the CD jewel case, are displayed that look similar to the interesting album cover artwork. The disc is almost 59 minutes. Fate of Nations is a tight, cohesive album.
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Format: Audio CD
I remember the first time I heard this album, when it came out back in 1993, I wasn't very immpressed by it. Perhaps, it was because I was listening to it on a cassette tape, on not the best of sound systems. Luckliy, through the urging of a friend, I gave it a second chance by borrowing his CD copy, and checking it out on my home system. Was I ever glad I did, as it turned out to be not only my favorite Robert Plant solo album - but one of my favorite albums, period! I went out and bought my own copy the next day.
Up until this point, I considered MANIC NIRVANA to be Plant's most consistent work, but on FATE OF NATIONS, he clearly rasied the bar. While still creating a fresh and current sound, this is also the closest in style to what Zeppelin brought to the musical table (driving rock, blues, acoustic & even some middle-eastern flavorings). Past Plant solo efforts tended to be hit or miss, and some sounded horribly of the times (SHAKEN N STIRRED is just waaaaay to 80's) - but this one has a timeless quailty.
While Plant hung on to some of the core members of his prior band for this release - guitarist Doug Boyle, bassist & son-in law Charlie Jones, and keyboardist Phil Johnstone - he would also bring in some inspired choices for the musicians/writing. Joining him on this outing were drummers Chris Hughes, Pete Thompson, and Michael Lee; guitarist Kevin Scott Machmichael (previoisly in Cutting Crew, who would play the majority of guitar here), Francis Dunnery (prior of It Bites) and Oliver J. Woods; and also Clannad vocalist Maire Brennan, and the band Star Club on some backing vocals ("Come into My Life" and "I Believe", respectively). The results produced by this band speak for themselves.
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Format: Audio CD
There would be very few Plant fans who would deny this is Robert's best solo record. I have them all, and the only one that gets nearly as much air time in my house is The Principle of Moments. On Fate Of Nations Robert tames his vocals. No more superfluous wailing of words like "c'mon" and "babeeeee" as he is prone to do. His singing is restrained and rich, unleashings of his patented wail restricted to where they fit seamlessly into the surrounding tapestry of sound. The music is strong, well written, and melodic (strip away all the trappings, leave Robert and an acoustic guitar, and they'd nearly all still stand up well). The production is rich and atmospheric without being too polished. My only criticism is that the momentum built up at the start seems to tail off towards the end. Perhaps a revised track order would have done the job. A challenge maybe to Plant fans with CD burners who agree with me. If you like Robert's other efforts, you'll love this one.
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Format: Audio CD
Not being a huge Zeppelin fan, Robert Plant's name doesn't cause me to drop to my knees, shake and tremble or go into fits. He's a musicial - period. His choice of cuts here is interesting. Chris Hughes (co-writer of Everybody Wants to Rule the World) and Plant produced this album. They have assembled quite a variety of backing artists including Enya's sister, Máire Brennan; his former son-in-law, Charlie Jones; hurdy-gurdy player, Nigel Eaton; flamboyant classically trained violinist, Nigel Kennedy and multi-instrument musician Maartin Allcock.

Of the songs on this album, probably the most famous is If I Were A Carpenter (Tim Hardin, 1967). Plant does a wonderful and respectful job on this remake making it one of my favorites and certainly a good reason alone to buy this album. I Believe, a tribute to his late son, and 29 Palms (or as the Marines who used to be stationed at MCAS 29 Palms called it, 29 Stumps) round out my choices for cuts I would put on a mix of my own.

Robert Plant as a soloist tries very hard not to sell himself as the vocalist for Led Zeppelin. I give him great credit to be himself on this disc.
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