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Fed Up [Blu-ray]

4.6 out of 5 stars 1,347 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

Narrated by Katie Couric, Fed Up blows the lid off everything we thought we knew about food and exercise, revealing a 30-year campaign by the food industry aided by the U.S. government to mislead and confuse the American public. Exposing the hidden truths contributing to one of the largest health epidemics in history, the film follows a group of families battling to lead healthier lives and reveals why the conventional wisdom of exercise and eat right is not ringing true for millions of people struggling with diabetes, childhood obesity and other serious conditions. Including captivating interviews with the country's leading experts, this vital information could change the way we eat forever.

Product Details

  • Actors: Katie Couric
  • Directors: Stephanie Soechtig
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    PG
    Parental Guidance Suggested
  • Studio: ANCHOR BAY
  • DVD Release Date: September 9, 2014
  • Run Time: 99 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,347 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00L5R5LL0
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #45,066 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
This documentary very well identifies the root cause of obesity in the modern world, and makes an excellent case for why 'calories in, calories out' is a broken model for viewing why we're growing around the waist as a society.

The basic premise of the documentary is that sugar is the primary culprit in our diet-- we have it in abundance, and add it to absolutely everything (especially things that are supposed to be 'healthy' by being low fat). High Fructose Corn Syrup is even added to the bread you buy off the shelf at the store. Our metabolisms aren't designed to handle this, and it winds up changing our hormones, which drives us to eat more than we ought to, and move less than we would otherwise. That is, it's the driver of calories in calories out, not the other way around.

Even though the documentary does an excellent job of establishing this, it makes some very problematic choices that I think will ultimately undermine its core message. The primary thing it does is recommends a lot of federal mandates and changing laws. It holds up former NYC mayor Bloomberg's work to outlaw sodas over a certain size as heroic, and asserts the reason why it failed was only because of a funded media storm.

This is not why it failed. It failed because Americans don't like being told what to do. They /really/ hate that-- even if what they're being told to do is good for them. Asserting that passing laws to force people to eat better is the right solution greatly ignores the culture it's directed toward. A much better solution would be to fix the federal guidelines to show the true culprit, improve education concerning nutrition science so people know what the true cause of being fat is, and get consumers to demand products that have less sugar.
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Interesting, but I've seen 'Hungry for Change', 'Food Inc.' and 'Forks over Knives', and this film didn't tell me anything different or new compared to those films. I still think 'Forks over Knives' is the best, but these films are all interesting to watch and they are helping to shine a light on these issues.
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Does a good job exposing the menace to our health that is sugar, in all its forms. But it fails to ask some of the hard questions about WHY there is now so much sugar in our diet. It briefly mentions the subsidies for corn production (and that corn is the source of many sugars that go into our food), but what would have happened if the Gentleman from Iowa who was so hot for food reform had been asked about corn subsidies? I'm betting he'd find a darn good reason why we need them. And for USDA remarketing ploys, they picked...cheese??? It's a sop to the crowd that still wants to demonize fat, which (except for trans-fats) does damage almost exclusively in the presence of...wait for it...excessive sugar, and the inflammation it generates in our bodies.
The artificial cheapness of American food can be laid straight at the government's feet, in what it (really we, the taxpayers) subsidizes. Subsidies originated in the 1930s as a way to underpin the production of cheap, storable carbohydrates during the Depression and Dust Bowl. It's completely counterproductive now, and corn and soy production are ruining our soil. It's good for somebody, but those somebodies are Monsanto, Coca-Cola, et al., NOT us.
How about a vegetable subsidy? Or a grassland incentive program, to encourage production of pastured beef and chicken. Feeding these creatures the all-grain diet that they now get at certain points in their lives is as bad for them as it is for us - and we end up eating their poor nutrition when we eat them.
True, realigning subsidies with what is actually good land stewardship, humane animal husbandry and good nutrition for animals and people would bring several industrial sectors to their knees.
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BLUF: Should you rent/see Fed Up? Yes!!! The movie Fed Up is inspirational and motivational. Even if you already know sugar (at least large amounts) is bad for you, this movie helps explain why we need to make better decisions as consumers about what kind of calories we put in our bodies.

Movie website: http://fedupmovie.com/#/page/home

Key highlights from the movie include a history lesson in the increase of sugar in our pre-packaged foods, why public school lunches are so bad for our children, and why the US Congress isn’t doing anything about it!

Two criticisms of the movie are the profile of obese children without showing/explaining what exactly the children are eating day to day and the lack of discussion on personal responsibility.

Several children and teenagers are followed throughout the movie. But the movie makes little to no effort to explain exactly what the kids are eating on a daily basis. While there are scenes with the kids eating, it doesn’t provide the viewer with any details on what unhealthy foods the kids are eating over the course of a week or month.

More concerning is the lack of personal responsibility addressed in the film. For obese Americans or the parents of obese children looking for an excuse, the commentary in the movie makes it easy to blame industry and government. Ultimately it is a personal responsibility. While the food industry is completely culpable and the US Government is only allowing the situation to get worse, individual Americans and parents must take responsibility and make better choices. Because in the end it is your life and the lives of our children at stake.

As of Jan ’15 the movie Fed Up has 4.5 out of 5 stars on Amazon reviews.
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