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Fed Up

4.3 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Track Listings

Disc: 1

  1. John Rock & Roll Sinclair (Studio Version)
  2. Slither
  3. Sleaze City
  4. Black Tea
  5. Younger Point Of View
  6. Fed Up
  7. Shakin' All Over
  8. Tuff Enuff
  9. Slash Your Face
  10. Are You A Boy Or Are You A Girl
  11. John Rock & Roll Sinclair (Live Version)
  12. Years Gone By
  13. Dog In The Cathouse


Product Details

  • Audio CD (November 14, 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Bacchus Archives
  • ASIN: B00004WF5Z
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #141,075 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

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Customer Reviews

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Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on June 19, 2001
Format: Audio CD
The Dogs were not really punk (they formed in 1970), and were not really early 70s hard rock either, but kind of a mix of 60s Detroit rock, 70s LA hard rock, and even Real Kids-type garage rock and power pop, if that makes any sense. Most of this CD is taken from a tape of a live show at San Francisco's Mabuhay Gardens in January 1977, where The Dogs certainly exhibited some raw power. My favorite is "Younger Point of View," which deals with important or, at least, well known late 60s events from "a younger point of view" in a ferocious and dramatic classic rock fashion. "Sleaze City" is also a good one. Hard rock and garage rock fans can't go wrong by buying this CD.
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Format: Audio CD
The Dogs were a lethal power trio from the Detroit class of '69 who unfortunately never got their due, though they had a bit of a revival in the late 70s, when most of this performance was recorded.
Loren Molinare's raspy growl and blazing guitarwork and Mary Kay's thundering bass were nicely matched to Ron Wood's drumming (not THE Ron Wood). Any band able to play this well live deserves more props than they got.
They follow a classic rocking format in their stuff that any garage or punk wannabes would do well to check out, though some of the tunes have a very 70s feel to them (but these days, that's no liability). Note: the live tracks are raw, and if you're a stickler for ultraclean production, you might not like it -- personally, I have no complaints about it; the rawness adds to the intensity and power, and doesn't impact the sound; it's just that you can tell it's live.
"Slither" manages a very 70s bump-and-grind with a dandy chugging bassline; "Sleaze City", "Fed Up", "Tuff Enuff", "Slash Your Face" are all very Stoogish/Detroit, relentlessly rocking and driving, boxing your ears into submission; "Black Tea" is a windmill rocker with some wild sound effects thrown in at the lead-in; "Younger Point of View" here is raw and powerful -- quite different from the restrained, quieter version that shows up on the DIY "LA" comp (where I first heard the Dogs). The various covers, like "Shakin' All Over" and "Are You a Boy or Are You a Girl?" are done with pluck and power.
Less fond of the two "John Rock & Roll Sinclair" cuts. Enough, already!
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Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This, as the other reviews have made clear, is a real hybrid band. Since they started in 1970 we could say they were part of the fabric that made punk rock though no one would say they were a punk rock band unless the only song they ever heard was the definitive Slash Your Face. Let's face it, there's only punx that would have a song with that title. No rock band would ever do that. The older I get the more I see that it's the song written that makes the heart of what exists as a song, then it's the delivery or the performance. Much like when a film has a screenplay and then much depends on how the actor performs the written word. You see over the years that particularly great songs can be covered and often it's not as brilliant as the original version but sometimes it can be really good. Slash Your Face, I have got to imagine, exists as a studio version. For years it was the only song by this band that I'd ever heard. Naturally, I assumed it was some heart of American passed over punk band, though lots of punk bands weren't really positioned to be music business muppets and make a living off their music. If they were gonna it was commonly going to be on their own terms and I think it helps explain why most punk bands from the late 70's to late 80's eventually went away. Punx like it that way, that is, it's not to make a living, it's to make our music our way and like it or peel off baby. The Dogs are clearly an independent band though I have no idea if they ever had aspirations to make it. They do have the classic punk band line up of a segment of punk bands of a girl on bass and she don't seem like a wilting flower. The band has all the power it needs with her much like most punk bands with a girl (or more than one) in the band. I see Shakin' All Over is a cover and nicely done.Read more ›
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