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The Female Eunuch Mass Market Paperback – 1972

3.5 out of 5 stars 37 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 373 pages
  • Publisher: Bantam; later printing edition (1972)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000BD40YI
  • Product Dimensions: 6.9 x 4.2 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 5.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (37 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,934,440 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I read Greer's The Whole Woman, her most recent endeavor, before reading The Female Eunuch--suddenly I understood why the reviews of the Whole Woman were so tepid-to-awful. I liked it, but reading Eunuch I realized that this woman had incredible style and swagger, but that she had written a much more delicious and fearless book back in 1970.
In the intervening years, so much has changed for women (because of feminism) that Greer's antics and ability to go head to head with macho rakes/serious artists (like she did with Norman Mailer in an infamous Town Hall meeting) is less notable. Still, Eunuch bristles with energy and youth and it makes me think, even though I was certainly not raised in the repressive forties and fifties.
I think that this book is definitely worth reading, especially to see how far we've come.
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By Jackie on November 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is an incredible and thought-provoking book. Written in, it seems, a blaze of fury,"The Female Eunuch," doesn't shy away from controversy.

To the reviewer who mentioned the style as inferior to more academic texts, I would agree - PROVIDED that you judge it on it's "sociological" merit as opposed to cultural. She doesn't support her claims with statistics or figures, and sometimes draws anecdotes that hardly seem to fit her premises from god-knows-where. No one but an egotistical, grandiose, self-important thinker would write in the style she writes in: namely the style most influential thinkers in history have used. If you see the truth in what she says, her ideas are great, poetic, motivational, etc. If you don't see the phenomena she describes in the book around you in your day-to-day life, then you are probably personally more liberated than the audience of "castrated women" she intended the book for. Either way, you'll definitely spot some glaring holes in her writing.

Reading this book as a kid (you heard me) shaped my philosophy of gender pretty powerfully. It's written in such a grabbing style, and it makes recommendations to the women of the world that are downright anarchistic, insubordinate, and earth-shaking. If you ever feel like your feminism is a little bit unambitious or tepid, this is the book to get you back on your feet, and really reanalyzing your place in the world as a feminist woman or man. Just read it. It will make you think important thoughts.
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By A Customer on May 12, 1999
Format: Paperback
I began reading "The Female Eunuch" after I had read Natalies Angiers "Woman : An Intimate Geography". It caused a sensation in its time and is still capable of shocking. Ms Angiers may have borrowed from The "Female Eunuch" because she also divides her books in to chapters with simple headings like the "body" and "work" and this gives both books clarity and focus. Where they differ is that Ms Greer,s is on shakier ground with her scientific references which can be excused since the book was first published in 1970.
Her statements about clitoral orgasms being a "new scientific myth" makes very odious and irritating reading. Ms Greer tries to excuse herself by saying that focusing on clitoral arousal is just another limiting perspective on female sexuality. She is wrong. Clitoral arousal is still a mystery to many women. Who still expect to achieve vaginal orgasms and wonder why they do not. Which only proves that for all the scientific hoopla in the 1970s. Most women are still ignorant about how their genitalia function.
Ms Greer mentions hiding her soiled sanitary rag from her brother as a girl and is obviously indignant about it But still does not question why female reproductive organs are considered so objectionable that they and their issue should be hidden. I would have considered this oversight a direct result of her childhood in Australia which is basically a secular country. However Ms Greer attended a Roman Catholic girls school. Implying that she should know full well why women genitals and menstrual fluid are considered 'unclean' It is laid out quite clearly in Leviticus.
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There was a lot in this book that I could not relate to. I can appreciate the struggle of women during the 60's/70's (when this book was written and released). However, the experiences of the 60's/70's women are completely different for women (in industrialized nations) today. I think this is a must-read for all feminists, and even though it was a miss for me, I would recommend it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Everyone should read this book -- in their late teens if they're lucky, but hopefully before thirty when the mundane tends to start to get in the way of what the Russians call 'inakomyslyashchie' ('different thinking' or 'dissidence'). Greer's searing indictment of misogyny as a political, economic and cultural norm has lost none of its power, since its original publication in 1970. If anything, in the post-feminist era her observations are all the more poignant, her arguments all the more powerful. Apart from the intensity of the writing, the prose is delightful. Truth hurts, but the pain of reading Greer is erased by the pleasure of the text.
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