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Fever, The

3.6 out of 5 stars 19 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

FEVER, THE

Special Features

None.

Product Details

  • Actors: Vanessa Redgrave, Michael Moore, Joely Richardson
  • Writers: Wallace Shawn
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Dubbed, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: Spanish (Dolby Digital 2.0 Stereo)
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: Unknown
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated:
    NR
    Not Rated
  • Studio: HBO Studios
  • DVD Release Date: January 5, 2010
  • Run Time: 83 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000QUCNOA
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #93,162 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Fever, The" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
Although categorized as Drama, this film is best thought of as a cinematic essay - one woman's affecting reflection on the mysteries of life, morality, politics, right and wrong in a complex world, the sort of stuff you may get from a good Charlie Rose interview but at a surprising depth. For a film consisting largely of Ms. Redgrave's ruminations in the form of a voice-over monologue, it was unexpectedly engaging. It asks all the right questions, even if it doesn't always have the satisfying answers.

There is something of a back story, but the story is basically besides the point. Although a lot of the filming was apparently done in Croatia and the location looks vaguely Eastern European, the fictional country that much of the story takes place in is never named. On the one occasion that someone pointed to a map of the country on a wall, oddly enough it was a map of China - you can clearly see Taiwan and Hainan off the coast.

Ms. Redgrave's character is in practically every frame, and every other character is basically a cameo. Michael Moore, who gets second billing, did a competent if not particularly demanding job playing a war correspondent in a single scene lasting about 3 minutes. The only actor that comes close to being a bona fide co-star is on screen for 6-7 minustes but she is not even mentioned on the jacket. That would be Angelina Jolie, who brings remarkable emotional depth to an otherwise small role.
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Format: DVD
Ok. This is one of those movies--few, sadly--that easily leads viewers to: 1, turn it off, commenting to dismayed, similarily bothered fellow on-lookers, "that's depressing!" as they seal the Netflicks envelope, or 2) "wow...there is something profound in the message here, and even if I am not ready to really sit with it, this is important stuff."

What runs over the character deftly played by Redgrave, are the subtle and pervasive ways selfishness, self-absorbtion, and cognitive short cuts are used by humans--typically of the well-healed classes, who possess more influence for change--as they bypass crimes carried out across the world. Ok. We've heard this before e.g., Jesus, Socrates, Ghandi, Biko, MLK, RFK, Marx and yes, even Michael Moore in his way. But Redgrave's confronting of her comission in the way things operate arrests. I suspect that few with a conscience, who look authentically at themselves, the world around, will remain unaffected. Spiritual, Economic, Political, Moral. This is revolutionary.

Well done.
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Format: DVD
Not knowing what to expect, I sat down with my morning coffee to watch Vanessa Redgrave, a true privledge any day. One does not expect to face challenges to one's societal norms over their morning coffee but this was to be that morning. The Fever is a philosophical shock. Jesus said, the poor you will always have with you but not him. Perhaps what he meant is that there will always be Jesus or someone like him to remind us of our common bond, our humanity, for Jesus was poor, as was Gandhi, Buddha, Mother Teresa and so many others with true compassion. This movie is crafted to challenge our fundamental belief in equality while maintaining fiscal classes, in our right to acquire more than others - where consumptions are small but continual. As with Brown vs the Board of Education, separate but equal cannot exist in a true republic.

I don't know if a movie can change a society but it can start a new trajectory and this movie certainly makes the attempt. It's not easy, comfortable or even necessarily desirable: after all, could it be made, could I watch if, I were not using those consumables? So, I give this high marks while recognizing the trajectory diversion will be miniscule. Look at a globe, drawn a new circumfrance line .1 degree off the current equator - eventually you will cover the globe. Gradual change is never fast enough but it is inevitable.

Don't expect to be glad you saw this movie. Don't let that stop you from understanding it. It's not Ayn Rand but it's not Karl Marx, either.
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Format: DVD
As already noticed, Vanessa Redgrave does a wonderful job playing... herself. I'm not so sure Angelina Jolie is quite there yet; had I decided to go through the labor of filming in such an evocative place, I'd have settled for an authentic actress of that place. Angelina starts credible, but soon loses it and reverts to her being an American in language and all that. Michael Moore is again OK, but his name in real life looms larger than his character's. All in all, 4 out of 5 stars for acting.

The story line is an entirely different animal. It starts by expanding the context of comfort for your typical westerner by considering the banality of evil in a nearby place, not known or seen despite its relative proximity. They could have chosen those kids in, say, Africa who disassemble electronic debris from the west, or some plantation workers, but such images have already been re-presented time and again and they must be soliciting by now mild indignation at best. No, the film makers don't choose such images to show the body of the iceberg we know only by its tip and call western affluence. They go into a place where people are Christian, and white, and (civil-)war-torn. Aha, so misfortune in this life is not ethnic as much as is geo-graphic. Since this 1/2 of the story is about the nearby geographies of misfortune in places we might mistake for our own, how do the filmmakers represent them and their peoples' struggles? Oops, from the perspective of the western newspaper reader. Yup, there's nothing to show they understand the drama of these places other than the cycle whereby a bunch of deceitful cynics replace a bunch of careless cynics.

What does the character of Redgrave do?
Read more ›
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