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The Fields

4.7 out of 5 stars 15 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Ty Schwamberger is a growing force within the horror genre. He is the author of a novel, multiple novellas and collections, and is the editor on several anthologies. In addition, he’s had many short stories published online and in print. Two stories, “Cake Batter” (released in 2010) and “House Call” (in pre-production in 2011), have been optioned for film adaptation. He is also an Active Member of the Horror Writers Association. You can learn more at tyschwamberger.com.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 82 pages
  • Publisher: Apex Book Company (December 20, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1937009025
  • ISBN-13: 978-1937009021
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.2 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,839,113 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Fields is a wonderfully crafted tale of ignorance, weakness, and evil--of the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. It's dark, atmospheric and brilliant. Ty makes us feel a part of the book's time period and of Billy's world, with his smooth prose and attention to detail. It's an original supernatural horror story, and alone it's great as is, but it's also a story with a message, a lesson. It has zombies, but I wouldnt think of it as a typical zombie novel, but a horror novel with the undead in it. And as everyone knows, a great tale is always about the humans, the most wicked of all monsters.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
It turns out that one way to go forward with the zombie genre is to go backwards--in time, anyway. Ty Schwamberger's novella, The Fields, offers up the story set in the days following the American Civil War of Billy Fletcher, a young plantation owner in dire need of help to keep the farm going before the tobacco crop dies. He inherited it after his father passed away, a cruel slave-owner who didn't just exploit those indentured on his farm, but tortured them as well, even burying slaves behind his expansive tobacco fields. Even his son wound up the receiving end of more than a few beatings for showing sympathy for the slaves and other deeds considered sins in his father's eyes.

But despite vowing to run the plantation differently from his father, to work the land himself rather than resort to slave labor, the young man is failing. Enter a man named Abraham who knocks on Billy's door one day and offers him a solution. There's no real telling where Abraham came from, but he sure seems to know a lot about Billy and his father, and assures Billy that what he needs to do is follow in his father's footsteps. And that's something that Billy is adamant about avoiding, because he doesn't want to be a slave-owner like his father. But what if the slaves are already dead?

This was a tremendously creepy zombie story, due mainly because of the racial current running through it. The idea that a person would only be enslaved during when they're alive, but when they're dead as well, is an unsettling one to say the least. One thing I had trouble envisioning as I read the book was the farm. Billy, Abraham, and the zombies jumped off the page, but the plantation itself felt very much like a stage-dressing when I was expecting something much more vivid.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Fantastic tale of the olde south as much a coming of age tale and family sins as a zombie fare,far from the usual standard outing.A unique gripping tale that causes many thoughts to linger within the reader upon completion,short but solid.This is my 3rd reading of this authors work and I must confess all are good,highly rccommended to all fans of the genre..
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By Adam on January 8, 2012
Format: Paperback
I found this review. I couldn't have said it better myself so I copied and pasted it:

The Fields by Ty Schwamberger
Review by Howard Allan

After I received an advanced copy of Ty Schwamberger's novella The Fields, I turned the first pages and immediately began reading kudos by notable authors and magazines such as Gary A. Braunbeck and Shroud Magazine. I never judge a book by its cover, but I do start judging books by their praise. And with an introduction by Jonathan Maberry (Rot and Ruin, Patient Zero), I was excited to start reading.
Jonathan Maberry starts off his introduction stating "The Fields is a morality tale. With Zombies." Maberry then explains to the reader that zombie tales are more than cannibalistic and mindless corpses. These tales, if written with feelings and responsibility, remind the reader zombies are people and they have life and their own stories. This is what Ty Schwamberger accomplishes with The Fields. He, as many authors have tried but failed, brings out the emotion of the characters but not just the living, but the dead also with much success.
The opening chapter sets The Fields pace; quick with that sense of emotion that is mentioned in Maberry's introduction. The reader is drawn in as Billy Fletcher, son of plantation owner in the Deep South, is racing through the darkness with zombie in tow. Schwamberger describes Billy's friendly relationship with the former slave now turned zombie Samuel. Yes, that could happen and yes, if you've studied American history, friendly relationship between slaves and owners did indeed exist. With not giving away too much of the plot, Billy survives the zombie encounter.
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By Jamie on August 1, 2012
Format: Kindle Edition
Positives: Details! Schwamberger puts the reader right into the story with the careful construction of setting. How many people would think of cow milk? Phrases like "the cruel nature of the sun" make great reading! Schwamberger captures the psychological fear of power and its abuses quite well. He conveys intense fear with very little gore or violence. This is the way zombie tales should be done!

Negatives: The last paragraph was a bit of a letdown, so stop before you get there!

Summary: Read this! One of the best zombie tales going right now.
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