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Fighting Gravity by [Petersen, Leah]
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Fighting Gravity Kindle Edition

4.7 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Length: 306 pages Word Wise: Enabled Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
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Product Details

  • File Size: 765 KB
  • Print Length: 306 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Dragon Moon Press (March 25, 2012)
  • Publication Date: March 25, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007OWQTMU
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
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  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,102,664 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Leah Petersen is giving readers everything they could ask for in her debut release, Fighting Gravity. What starts out as a story with a dystopian feel soon morphs into a teenage boy/girl romance and then segues into a m/m love story with the entire book wrapped up in a sci-fi/futuristic bow. The action moves along at a nice pace presenting a young man's life told from his perspective and the events that befall him good and bad.

Jake Dawes is an intriguing character that practically grows up before our eyes. He came from the unclass and as such was treated shabbily by many. For him to succeed as he did was quite the nose snubbing to the upperclass. I enjoyed seeing him excel when so many thought he'd fail and said he wasn't worthy of trying to better himself. His spontaneous comments and political views sometimes condemned him to some bleak circumstances and I kept wishing he'd learn from those moments, especially when he kept saying he'd learned, but I was continually left frustrated by him.

The Emporer, Pete, is an equally likable character. He's a just leader and tries to always give Jake what he wants. Whereas he understands how precarious the line is when it comes to socioeconomic status, Jake bulldozes through a situation which is why he's always in trouble. Pete's always left trying to reign him in. The connection between these men was palpable from the first time they made eye contact. Being with Jake makes Pete feel more human, more real, since everyone else is bowing down to him. When they're together it's like everyone else doesn't exist.

The romantic life of Jake permeates through the entire story starting with Kirti with them coming together to assuage their loneliness.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Such a combination of genres, I'm not even sure where to start!

How about science fiction? Fighting Gravity is, in my opinion, much less sci than fi. Very little of the standard tech of scifi is present, and the same with interstellar travel and other worlds, except almost in passing (such as an unscheduled stop at a nebula to sightsee). Don't get me wrong, this is by no means a complaint, but as a lifelong scifi fan I do look for that 'definition' of traditional scifi (to paraphrase, if the science is taken out of the story it would collapse). Fighting Gravity has scifi elements, but is not necessarily scifi. The story could have easily taken place in Elizabethan England with horse-drawn carriages without missing a beat.

Which brings me to fantasy. Again several elements of fantasy, even high fantasy, are contained within Fighting Gravity. You have emperors and empires, children taken away from their homes for bigger and better things, other worlds and time frames, and so on. But again, no elves, no magic spells, no flying carpets.

Romance? Now we're getting closer. Fighting Gravity is at its heart a romance between a royal and a commoner; a privileged one surrounded by wealth, opulence, and advisers, in love with an 'unclass' nobody. Now we've got the elements: forbidden, hidden love with the empire in the balance. But that's still not Fighting Gravity as a whole.

So what is the story? To paraphrase James Carville, "it's about the characters, stupid." From page one, I was captivated by Jacob Dawes' story and couldn't stop turning the pages. I'm normally a reader looking for things blowing up and bullets flying, but the story was that good I didn't miss them.
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Format: Kindle Edition
Even though I don't read this type of sci-fi book normally, I was really happy to read this ARC! I enjoyed reading Leah Petersen's debut, and I liked the protagonist.

This one's about Jacob--Jake--a very intelligent but poor boy, who gets ripped off from his family by the Imperial Intellectual Complex (I was really immersed in the story when poor Jake gets tore from his family! So sad...). At first, Jake is really angry because he thinks of his family and his sister that he loves so much. Then after he adjusts to this new life, he meets the emperor (also a boy), and he's yanked again from what he knows, because the emperor wants him by his side. I don't want to give much away, but there's a love story between Jake and the emperor, and the book has a great pacing.

As I said, I'm not used to reading this type of fiction, and just because of the premise, I'd give it four stars. But in the end, I gave it five, because it surprised me in a good way.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I bought this book soon after it came out, as Leah Petersen and I had discussed writing on twitter for a while. So when she released Fighting Gravity, I picked it up for Kindle. At the time I wasn’t much of a Kindle reader, and so the book sat unread for a while—until I started reading more on the electronic device. In a way, I’m glad I waited, so I could read the whole series back-to-back!

Fighting Gravity is told in first person from the point of view of Jacob Dawes, a young genius physicist. Jacob is a fantastic character, and even though he makes so many “wonderful” (read: awful, terrible) choices, those same things make him feel incredibly real on the page. It is his ability to fail so spectacularly and in such a way that, as readers, we understand that make him so incredible.

Not to jump into the plot too much, but in the first chapter Jacob is picked up to go to the ICC—a school for genius children so they can invent new things for the empire. It is always to the ICC that Jacob seems to turn to, and though Petersen does not allow much time on the page for this schooling to happen, we know enough to see this place as a part of Jacob. It is through his connection with the school that he meets the emperor, and starts a romance that captures our hearts.

Petersen has an excellent touch for voice and a fantastic sense of character. In this book, and throughout the series, each character is seen again and again, popping up, much like they do in our own lives. Her use of language and details is well-planned and immediately gives us the information we need to know. Her descriptions are well-placed and just sparse enough to create a little craving which she satisfies bit by bit.

Fighting Gravity is a fast-paced story.
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