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Film Is Not Dead: A Digital Photographer's Guide to Shooting Film (Voices That Matter) 1st Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 75 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0321812803
ISBN-10: 0321812808
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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jonathan Canlas is a popular and in-demand wedding and commercial/magazine photographer who shoots exclusively with film. He has a degree in photography from Brigham Young University and lives with his family in Utah. Jonathan is a go-to voice in this growing, niche part of the industry, and he teaches Film Is Not Dead (FIND) workshops around the world. jonathancanlasphotography.com

Kristen Kalp is a Philadelphia-based writer who pens her business & wordly wisdom at brandcampblog.com.
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Product Details

  • Series: Voices That Matter
  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: New Riders; 1 edition (February 2, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321812808
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321812803
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 0.9 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (75 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,036,640 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By C. France on May 17, 2013
Format: Hardcover
There are two ways to review this book; One being the content. Two being where it leads the reader.

Mr Canlas has become a very successful photographer. The photographs in the book although simple, have a unique style and asthetic. Compositionally sometimes stifled, but on average, well done and executed nicely.

The book is about film photography. It takes you through various types of film and how to shoot with them. But this information is limited. Other areas of the book discuss business and rapport with clients, and building a business. It promotes Mr Canlas other ventures such as his workshops, which despite this being allowed for his own book, not necessary for a book that others will read about film photography, its use, and tips and tricks for successful shooting.

It gives an impression this book is for novices, however Id disagree with this. Film photography is not about clicking the shutter and hoping, there is skill and knowledge involved in its use. There is another reason why Canlas is so successful and builds upon other successful film portrait photographers, and that is the lab Canlas works with. In order to achieve his signature look you have to have a lab who knows what they are doing. Unfortunately, this is where as a film user you will come undone. RPL, Canlas lab, is in California. If youre in the area, then great, but outside the U.S you will not reap the benefits of using this book and its contents. I should know. Ive been shooting film for many years and there is no lab in the country (the UK) that can achieve Canlas's asthetic.

This book I believe is a front to expose more of Canlas work, website, and possible commissions, not really about helping others shoot better film photography.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I, like so many photographers, really love how freeing shooting film can be. There is a lot of literature being published today on how to shoot and process a digital image, but so many for film. Granted most images are taken digitally these days. For those like me, looking for some film inspiration, this book may seem enticing.

Many other reviewers mentioned this as well, and that is the amount of verb age spent talking about how great the Contax 645 is. Wonderful, if you can afford one. I was also really disappointed in his writing style. It was more like reading a poorly edited BLOG than a well researched book. This book is really more of a large picture album of some of Canlas favorite work, which other reviewers had mentioned, and I still went ahead and bought it. Mistake. It's a nice book to look at, but it's not one to sit down and delve into the understanding of film in a new way. I would suggest looking at this book in person before shelling out $30 and up for it.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I have recently been getting into film photography and I was curious about this book. It does cover some good information but a lot of it is step by step guides and a lot of it is related to medium format, especially the Contax 645 that the author is very fond of. Nothing wrong with that but since I don't have one of those I felt I got a lot less out of the book than what I expected.

The format of which the book is written is what would be more suitable for a enthusiast website than a book.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is mostly to show off the photos that the author makes, not about film photography. The information contained is so basic that it becomes boring to read (thankfully, there is so little text that the 271 pages are read in less than 1 hour). There is no topic treated in depth, everything is so superficial and written in such an annoyingly coolish way that, frankly, I felt treated as if I were stupid. Get Ansel Adams' trilogy if you want to learn film photography.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
*Film Is Not Dead* is a beautiful book to flip through. Jon Canlas produces striking photography, and as an album for that work, *Film Is Not Dead* offers an incredible example of what's possible--with photography, with gorgeous minimalistic album design, with building a business based on artistic vision. It's wonderfully inspirational on all of those levels, and it's probably appropriate, then, that much of what Canlas and his writing partner Kristen Kalp propose assumes the conversational, encouraging tones of self-help literature.

*Film Is Not Dead* is not a technical discussion. Canlas does provide a direct and straightforward recipe to achieve a credible film photography product; he offers specific equipment, media, and processing recommendations. And he provides some simple, well-explained guides to metering technique and camera loading. *Film Is Not Dead* does not, however, dig very far or deep into why Canlas's recipes or recommendations work the way they do. He'll suggest that 35mm results are usually grainier than medium format, for example, but the book won't show you a comparison or discuss how or why this is the case. He'll recommend specific ISO films for various uses, but the book doesn't actually line-up examples of these films in use as illustration. (So: why use 400 if 160 will work, too?) Use Kodak films with one palette of colors and Fuji with another, he'll suggest, but the book never actually lines up Kodak or Fuji results in such a way that illustrates the difference. Meter with a grey card and your camera's spot meter for slide film, he recommends, but use your incident meter for print. Why shouldn't I use incident readings for slide film? How might my exposure differ?
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