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First Generation White Collar: A practical guide on how to get ahead and not just get by with your money Paperback – December 30, 2010

4.1 out of 5 stars 8 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

About the Author

L. Marie Joseph (www.lmariejoseph.com) is a personal finance blogger whose work has been mentioned in CNNMoney, MSN Money, US News & World Report, and Forbes Woman. She has educated several college graduates in breaking the barrier from getting by with money to getting ahead with money. Mrs. Joseph has been a recognized authority in personal finance and personal development. Marie has directly impacted the lives of many minorities nationwide in wealth building.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 114 pages
  • Publisher: Moshire Press (December 30, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 061539082X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0615390826
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.3 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,093,998 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 23, 2011
Format: Paperback
L. Marie Joseph has her ducks in a row. Given the rather ominous economic situation not only in this country but throughout the world, Joseph takes all of the information of our economy dilemma, distills it in an opening preface, and then sets about informing young new white collar generation members how to avoid falling into the pit that is our current anathema - debt, financial instability and lack of training in money management.

What makes this brief book so very useful is Joseph's manner of writing. Not setting herself up as a spanking professor, she instead takes each step of planning in a sequence that is not only reasonable but also practical. Her subtitle for this book in many ways says it all - 'A practical guide on how to get ahead and not just get by with your money.' She begins with warnings about the use of credit cards, the use of which generally leads to living beyond our means, about paying off student loans, saving money from each paycheck, living simply, making (and keeping) a budget, and then gives very solid helpful information on investments such as portfolio types and buying a house and car.

Yes, we all should know this information but we all have slipped into the danger zone Joseph is trying to teach our young white collar workers to avoid. The book does not stop there: for those of us who have learned her lessons the hard way there is much information here for reparative work! Grady Harp, January 11
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Format: Paperback
This book has a lot of good advice, but it looks like it was slapped together hurriedly in Word, and printed with no proofreading whatsoever. I'm about halfway through, and I've seen multiple instances of typos (sometimes making the meaning of a sentence all-but-incomprehensible) and sentence fragments. I'm not sure I'd give the author three stars out of five on writing skills, and the editor at Moshire Press responsible for this book should be ashamed.

That being said, the book contains a lot of good advice, especially for the target audience. The power of compound interest is massive, and the earlier you start investing, the better off financially you'll be. I'm pretty sure this information is available elsewhere, better stated, but if you're looking for a quick read with a lot of good advice, this book will work.
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Format: Paperback
On Halloween, Marie Joseph's sister took her trick-or-treating in an upper-middle-class neighborhood. She'd never seen such wealth. Compared to her family's modest wood bungalow, the houses looked like the stately mansion in Gone with the Wind. That night, Marie determined that she wanted to be wealthy.

She attended college and landed a good job, but being first-generation white collar, she didn't know anything about building wealth. In addition to her student loan, she borrowed for a new car, furniture, appliances and vacations. Rather than saving for the good life, she financed it, learning painful lessons before achieving the success she longed for.

Fortunately, Marie shares those lessons in her book so that college students and recent graduates can gain benefit from her hard-earned wisdom the easy way - learning from another's mistakes rather than their own. Her lessons are practical, specific, and simple:

* Pay off your credit cards each month.
* Save up for items rather than borrowing.
* Save 30 percent of your income and live off the remaining 70 percent.
* Don't take out a student loan more than you can expect to earn in a year at your first post-college job.
* Set aside a substantial (six months of household expenses) emergency fund.
* Invest for the future with mutual funds from respected companies like T. Rowe Price, Fidelity and Vanguard.
* Purchase a house that you can afford. Your payment should be under 30 percent of your income. Another rule of thumb: the price of the house should be no more than two and a half times your salary (no more than two times if you want to be wealthy). Get a traditional loan - not an ARM or interest only.
* Work on your social skills - your number one asset for landing a great job.
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
On Halloween, Marie Joseph's sister took her trick-or-treating in an upper-middle-class neighborhood. She'd never seen such wealth. Compared to her family's modest wood bungalow, the houses looked like the stately mansion in Gone with the Wind. That night, Marie determined that she wanted to be wealthy.

She attended college and landed a good job, but being first-generation white collar, she didn't know anything about building wealth. In addition to her student loan, she borrowed for a new car, furniture, appliances and vacations. Rather than saving for the good life, she financed it, learning painful lessons before achieving the success she longed for.

Fortunately, Marie shares those lessons in her book so that college students and recent graduates can gain benefit from her hard-earned wisdom the easy way - learning from another's mistakes rather than their own. Her lessons are practical, specific, and simple:

* Pay off your credit cards each month.
* Save up for items rather than borrowing.
* Save 30 percent of your income and live off the remaining 70 percent.
* Don't take out a student loan more than you can expect to earn in a year at your first post-college job.
* Set aside a substantial (six months of household expenses) emergency fund.
* Invest for the future with mutual funds from respected companies like T. Rowe Price, Fidelity and Vanguard.
* Purchase a house that you can afford. Your payment should be under 30 percent of your income. Another rule of thumb: the price of the house should be no more than two and a half times your salary (no more than two times if you want to be wealthy). Get a traditional loan - not an ARM or interest only.
* Work on your social skills - your number one asset for landing a great job.
Read more ›
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