The Fits

 (231)6.71 h 12 min20167+
While training at the gym 11-year-old tomboy Toni becomes entranced with a dance troupe. As she struggles to fit in she finds herself caught up in danger as the group begins to suffer from fainting spells and other violent seizures.
Directors
Anna Rose Holmer
Starring
Royalty HightowerAlexis NeblettDa'Sean Minor
Genres
DramaArthouse
Subtitles
English [CC]
Audio languages
English
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More details

Supporting actors
Lauren GibsonMakyla BurnamInayah RodgersQ-Kidz Dance Team
Producers
Lisa Kjerulff
Studio
Oscilloscope
Purchase rights
Stream instantly Details
Format
Prime Video (streaming online video)
Devices
Available to watch on supported devices

Reviews

3.2 out of 5 stars

231 global ratings

  1. 37% of reviews have 5 stars
  2. 8% of reviews have 4 stars
  3. 14% of reviews have 3 stars
  4. 21% of reviews have 2 stars
  5. 20% of reviews have 1 stars

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Top reviews from the United States

JunknastiReviewed in the United States on December 25, 2017
3.0 out of 5 starsFantastic but confusing
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Why I want to love this movie:
-The acting was fantastic! I love movies with unknown and amazing talent. One of the interesting things about the acting was that you only really ever got to see and hear from the teens in the movie. All the adults are nameless, faceless (mostly), and all around useless/unimportant. That was very novel and interesting to watch that way.
-Fascinating plot with very little dialogue.
-Simplistic yet stunning directing and filming. The simplicity made everything that happened in the film important. Example: The main character Toni will just be walking in a scene and the camera will be focused on her, but there is so much going on in the background all the time. Keeping the camera focused on her even when she isn't doing anything except walking, gives the viewer time to notice what is going on in the background.

Why I just can't give this more stars:
-Too short! I normally don't notice how long a movie is, but this was so short that it felt like the movie wasn't over yet.
-What is happening? Why is it happening? Why just girls? What was the dance scene towards the end? Is the theme about fitting in? Is it supernatural? Is it coming of age? ENDLESS questions! I generally enjoy movies that leave the viewer with questions and that make the viewer think, but this one was SO open ended it was frustrating. There was pretty much zero closure. WARNING SPOILERS: You think you know what is going on towards the beginning; the girls are pregnant and are suffering the side effects in an extreme way. As the movie continues, all the girls, even the ones too young to be pregnant get the fits (did they all just get their period? Yet ANOTHER question). Then Toni has a vision, floats towards the other girl, then also has a fit. Finish the movie with a slight smile and a confused look on my face.

I would love if a film professional could examine this movie, because I think there is more going on than my tiny brain can understand. Overall, fantastic movie but I'm not so sure it will be on my repeat watching list.
11 people found this helpful
Eric M. VanReviewed in the United States on January 3, 2017
4.0 out of 5 starsA Must for Arthouse Fans, All Others Avoid!
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Yup: if you loved The Tree of Life, see this ASAP; if not, skip it. This is pure arthouse: superb direction, cinematography, and editing, very fine score, sometimes slow pace (enlivened by some dance action), and a very slight story. The two lead performances are very good, the others perfunctory (they're all non-professionals).

For arthouse fans, the 5th star is going to depend on how much metaphorical meaning you draw from the title phenomenon. For me, the film left too many dots for the viewer to connect (which is to say, all of them). The "fits" would have seemed more meaningful to me had the elements of the story that they seem to symbolize (coming of age, the need to conform to one's peers while remaining an individual, etc.) been fleshed out more in the literal story. As it is, they stand in for these themes rather than connecting to them (since they're not much there to connect to). I can understand why some arthouse fans would rather have it the other way around, though.

In the meantime, this is a stunning directorial debut, in terms of behind-the-camera talent. There are images as breathtaking as anything you're likely to see this year.
8 people found this helpful
Long Time CustomerReviewed in the United States on March 30, 2019
5.0 out of 5 starsIncredible Movie on Spiritual Realities while Coming to Age
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Mind blowing ending! Perfectly sums up the varied aspects and uncertainty of adolescent group dynamics, hysteria, and even altered-state spiritual realities. I loved the progression from the physical (the water), to group pressure/hysteria, to the spiritual realm. Afterwards, I realized that this progression was not only focused on the surface level (exploring various altered aspects), but it was also an allegory of the progression of a girl changing as she enters young adulthood.

By the end, it reminded me of classics such as 2001 A Space Odyssey (foreign compelling societal/world influence), Alfred Hitchcock's horror movies - and even the Catcher in the Rye. This movie was profoundly spiritual (hopefully not of an evil origin but it left that open) - in fact, the end left the door open for you to decide the origin of the "Fits" and it's significance in the young heroine's life. (Spirits, Hysteria, peer-pressure, etc . . .) Although, yea, she did kind of levitate so . .(unless she just imagined that).

On the most basic level, I guess she just fully opened up and allowed herself to become one of the dancers. She let go and let it enter her. She allows the dancers to enter every aspect of her old-style self that was holding her back from this, such as the boxing ring, the training steps, and other scenes. She opened herself to full initiation: she was "all-in" for better or worse.

Great Movie! Multi-dimensional!
2 people found this helpful
joel wingReviewed in the United States on May 16, 2021
3.0 out of 5 starsComing of age? Pseudo-horror? A sickness or a spirt? Some questions the movie raises
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Royal Hightower is a quiet 11 year old girl who trains relentlessly for boxing with her older brother Da’Sean Minor. One day she sees a dance off between some girls however which captures her imagination. It means a whole new world with a new discipline and most importantly people as she’s only really been with her brother before. Director Anna Rose Holmer drives that last point home in one scene where Hightower is in the locker room packed with girls and goes to the bathroom so she can be by herself. She eavesdrops on two older girls and only emerges when everyone else has left.

That’s all good but it’s not all. Older girls on the dance team start having convulsions and getting sick. It changes up the entire dynamic from being a coming of age tale to a pseudo-horror story. It never gives any explanation for what happens. Was it a sickness? Was it a spirit searching for the right vessel? It just ends. It also raises questions about the title. Was it the fits that the girls were hit with? Was it about fitting in? Again they’re just left as open questions.
DaneReviewed in the United States on September 25, 2016
5.0 out of 5 starsArtful and mindful
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A must see. This is not trying to be a big flashy Hollywood blockbuster. This is about art. This is about childhood. Fear of change. Individuality and being part of a group. It is beautiful and tender and just strange enough to put you in a different mindset. An excellent watch for those with kids who are not sure about the big teenage world around them. They can be strong, and beautiful, and unique, and part of something. And scary things can be okay. The cinematography, music, directing, are beautifully done. The kids are amazing as first time actors, honest and earnest.
19 people found this helpful
Wise OneReviewed in the United States on October 13, 2018
2.0 out of 5 starsArt without Meaning
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Slow pans and human vulnerabilities artfully displayed, but without cause. Left me feeling cut off from whatever I was supposed to get.
7 people found this helpful
J.Reviewed in the United States on May 14, 2017
3.0 out of 5 starsBeautiful aesthetically. Clearly carefully thought out
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This was weird. Well done and worth the time! Beautiful aesthetically. Clearly carefully thought out. Lots of pieces of story not spoken directly in the dialog at all. This feels a bit like a coming-of-age story for "Tone", the main character, in her particular world of the American, urban, predominiantly black community center. A lot is unexplained but by the end the answers I was seeking mattered less. It's about what it means to be free, empowered, fearless, and expressive.
3 people found this helpful
marciaReviewed in the United States on October 2, 2020
3.0 out of 5 starsA beautiful mystery
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This film was beautiful in it's focus on young black girls. The camera quietly followed them, giving the audience a rare chance to witness these young ones just being. There was very little dialogue and no hidden agendas. That's refreshing since many films portray black girls being sexually exploited, violent, or promiscuous. Although I enjoyed the film, it is a mystery to me. I don't know what the film wanted to say about "the fits"; I simply loved what it said about black girls.
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