Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$35.00
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Lost Flamingoes of Bombay Hardcover – 2009

3.9 out of 5 stars 7 customer reviews

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$113.97 $10.48

The Amazon Book Review
The Amazon Book Review
Author interviews, book reviews, editors picks, and more. Read it now
click to open popover
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 349 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin (2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0670081752
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670081752
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.8 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,236,584 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Live2Cruise VINE VOICE on October 18, 2010
Format: Paperback
It's difficult to pinpoint what type of novel "The Lost Flamingoes of Bombay" really is. It's part legal thriller, part expose of government corruption, and part love story. This could have been a strange mixture but the author pulls it off beautifully, weaving the parts into a beautifully written, compelling whole.

The back cover refers to the novel as "Fitzgeraldian," and there are certainly many aspects which recall "The Great Gatsby." A young photographer, Karan, is assigned to shoot a famous pianist who long ago withdrew from his career. In the process of meeting Samar, the pianist, Karan is also introduced to his best friend/ soul mate, Bollywood actress Zaira, and Samar's lover, Leo. The foursome begin to spend some time together and Karan finds himself drawn into their world. This comprises the first part of the novel, which consists of three parts.

In the second part, a tragedy occurs which affects all of the characters. This leads to a close look at the corruption of India's political and legal system and what happens when justice is subverted by politics. In the third part of the novel, the characters must come to grips with what has happened to them. This part is a more meditative segment, reflecting on the nature of love and sexuality in a very poignant and classy way.

All in all this was a very worthwhile read which explored some interesting themes and shed light on the world of Bollywood as well as India's political and judicial system.
Comment 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This novel is a bit like a tabloid-tell-all, set in Bombay, and I mean that in the best way. A reclusive pianist, a Bollywood star, a repressed artist, a Nick Carraway-ish photographer: the cast is appropriately superficial and self-destructive and yet, as we -- and Karan Seth, the outsider-turned-insider -- discover, there's depth and passion and fear.

I wasn't sure what I was getting into as the jacket blurb is fairly vague (but mentions Fitzgerald, which caught my interest). There is a sort of Fitzgerald feel to the novel -- the glitzy tragedy of those who invite heartbreak and disaster -- but Shanghvi managed to make (most) of the characters real enough that I still felt for them. A kind of frenetic sadness infuses the story, which is part bildungsroman, part crime thriller, part celebrity expose.

There's a real crudity in the writing but I found it emphasized the frenzy of celebrity, the repressed sexual nature of the characters and the world they lived in. Sensitive readers will likely be turned off by the language and at times it felt nearly misogynistic but isn't entirely out-of-place given the tone of the novel.

Whereas Shanghvi's narrative prose had me in swoons, I found his dialogue stiff, stilted, and unbelievable. I think the attempt was to make the characters sound superficial but it read, for me, inauthentic and archaic. (Shanghvi has the characters using some very odd, dated slang and I kept flipping to the front of the book to see if this was a problem with translation.) Honestly, it felt like two different people were at work in this book.

At times, the novel felt a little long: enormous day-to-day detail around some events and then a leap of four years or ten years.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was a very intense book. I loved all the characters. Esp. Mr Ward Davies.This writer is incredible, a beautiful writer. I cried at the end. That rarely ever happens to me. So keep on writing, please. It was a pageturner for me. The culture in India is always so inspiring to me. You are very talented to be so young...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Quite a good read. A bit slow at times. A very radical view of life in Bombay. But it does expose the corruption and lies that run through the fabric of life in India, but good triumphs over evil finally.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse