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Comment: Only lightly used. Book has minimal wear to cover and binding. A few pages may have small creases and minimal underlining. Book selection as BIG as Texas.
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We Followed Our Stars Paperback – May 14, 1999

4.0 out of 5 stars 3 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Harlequin Mills & Boon (May 14, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0373000006
  • ISBN-13: 978-0373000005
  • Product Dimensions: 7.8 x 5.1 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,693,553 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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By Claire Richardson on August 24, 2015
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This author wrote over 70 Harlequin Romance novels, and this autobiograpy. It was a good read, but spent a lot of time on love of Opera, which i didnt relate to. Don't let that stop you from reading it. She talks about her life, and just how she got into writing the romances. Most of the book takes place in the 30s and 40s, which in itself is very interesting. I'm just happy to see that one can get a book written in the 50s and 60s that wasnt a best seller. Glad it was on Amazon.
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Format: Paperback
Ida Cook and her sister Louise were minor British civil servants earning only 2 or 3 pounds a week in the 1920s when they heard their first operatic recording, and they immediately and forever fell in love. The "stars" they followed were opera stars. Saving a pound a week for two years, they financed their first passage to America to hear the magnificent Amelita Galli-Curci at the old Met in New York, after their unbounded passion for opera had prompted Galli-Curci to offer them tickets whenever they should manage to get there. Thus began their lifelong seemingly deep and respectful friendships with dozens of opera singers, among them Rosa Ponselle, Ezio Pinza, and later Maria Callas. The book tells of their queuing from early morning at Covent Garden for the then-unreserved gallery seats for the two-month-long opera season, of their "snapping" the stars and then presenting them with photographs in return for signatures on their own copies. Friendship with the Austrian conductor Clemens Krauss and his wife, the Rumanian opera singer Viorica Ursuleac, led them in the mid-1930s into assisting Jews to leave Germany. By then, Ida was penning romantic novels under the name of Mary Burchell for the publisher Mills & Boon and earning a little more than her civil service salary, but between them they still had not enough funds to be guaranteeing the livelihoods of many fleeing Jews, who were restricted entry to Britain to only those who could find a guarantor until the immigration quotas of their destination countries would allow them to move on. But the pogroms of Nazi Germany would not wait for quotas.Read more ›
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Format: Hardcover
Ida Cook and her sister Louise were minor British civil servants earning only 2 or 3 pounds a week in the 1920s when they heard their first operatic recording, and they immediately and forever fell in love. The "stars" they followed were opera stars. Saving a pound a week for two years, they financed their first passage to America to hear the magnificent Amelita Galli-Curci at the old Met in New York, after their unbounded passion for opera had prompted Galli-Curci to offer them tickets whenever they should manage to get there. Thus began their lifelong seemingly deep and respectful friendships with dozens of opera singers, among them Rosa Ponselle, Ezio Pinza, and later Maria Callas. The book tells of their queuing from early morning at Covent Garden for the then-unreserved gallery seats for the two-month-long opera season, of their "snapping" the stars and then presenting them with photographs in return for signatures on their own copies. Friendship with the Austrian conductor Clemens Krauss and his wife, the Rumanian opera singer Viorica Ursuleac, led them in the mid-1930s into assisting Jews to leave Germany. By then, Ida was penning romantic novels under the name of Mary Burchell for the publisher Mills & Boon and earning a little more than her civil service salary, but between them they still had not enough funds to be guaranteeing the livelihoods of many fleeing Jews, who were restricted entry to Britain to only those who could find a guarantor until the immigration quotas of their destination countries would allow them to move on. But the pogroms of Nazi Germany would not wait for quotas.Read more ›
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