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Food Rebellions: Crisis and the Hunger for Justice Paperback – July 21, 2009

3.7 out of 5 stars 6 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 260 pages
  • Publisher: Food First Books; F First Paperback Edition Used edition (July 21, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 093502834X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0935028348
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 5 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #137,644 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By Nicholas Jackson on September 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
This book makes a critical contribution to discussions of the current food crisis and what can be done to increase food equality, security and justice. It covers multiple global regions and in particular Africa, Latin America, Europe and the United States. I was particularly amazed by the statistics indicating that organic, smallholder, local, polycrop farms are more productive than the intensive monocropping with chemical inputs. This is a critical point. The book would have been strengthened by more expanded treatment of pervasive arguments for GMO and Green Revolution technologies. The value of these agricultural "innovations" is assumed by a large section of those concerned with food, and who are not necessarily convinced by a significantly one-sided argument in opposition. The arguments that resonate with less financially invested individuals must be addressed at their maximum strength in order to prove convincing. This weakness, however, should in no way detract from the invaluable contributions that this book makes to projects for sustainable food security.
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First, the nitty stuff that drives me crazy: the text is interrupted with "box" information that sometimes detracts from the book instead of enhancing it. It also doesn't help that the grammar is poor and punctuation sparse. Several times, I was confused and had to re-read something to figure out what I was supposed to be understanding. But, those are mainly the things that bother word nerds like myself. If you can get over that, this is a worthwhile read.

The authors of Food Rebellions made me laugh when I read, "according to [the industrial food titans], a world without Yara, Cargill, ADM, Monsanto, Tyson, TESCO, and Wal-Mart is a world doomed to starvation" (85). I laughed and thought, oh that's funny. But it's so true! One of the major topics in all of the sustainable food books is the misguided idea of reliance on the industrial food system to cure poverty and hunger. It's been eating at me (pun intended) because it's so contrary to common sense and the history of mankind's relationship with agriculture. The authors say it well, summing up my own opinion on the matter, "In overall output, the small, diversified farm produces much more food" (p.116).

The idea of urban food gardens (as provided as an example solution, p.166) is something we've seen in movies (Dirt!, The Power of Community, and Fresh, among others, all discuss this concept), and I've personally noticed it more when reading magazines like Sunset and Better Homes and Gardens.

Even if we frequent our local farmers markets, grow our own food when possible, get our consumer message to the powers that be... there still needs to be a change to the overall system, the infrastructure, the taxes and the policies and the international programs that simply perpetuate the wrongness of the current system.
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Format: Paperback
I found Food Rebellions! to be a concise critique of the global food system backed a wealth of data and (short) case studies. Speaking as a reader already familiar with many of the issues discussed, it was a quick, easy read for me. I would highly recommend Food Rebellions! for those seeking to understand the deeper causes of hunger and poverty in the world. Another bonus is that it discusses a range of alternatives to current food policy.
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