Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books.
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Forrests has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $25.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Item is in good condition. May include some wear and creases on the cover. Fast shipping. Free delivery confirmation with every order.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Forrests Paperback – August 7, 2012

3.7 out of 5 stars 26 customer reviews

See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$15.00
$0.95 $0.01

The Light Between Oceans
"The Light Between Oceans" by M.L. Stedman
Once you find love, can you ever let it go? The movie, based on the New York Times bestselling novel The Light Between Oceans, opens 9/2 starring Michael Fassbender, Rachel Weisz, Alicia Vikander. Learn more | See author page
$15.00 FREE Shipping on orders with at least $25 of books. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
click to open popover


Editorial Reviews

Review

“Transcendent… the author's descriptively rich prose and sense of scene drives the story on…Perkins knows how to artfully reveal her characters' inner machinations as they cope with whatever comes their way.” ―Publishers Weekly, starred review

“This timelessly true tale will appeal to discerning readers of literary fiction.” ―Booklist

“Perkins has a remarkable ability to capture the joys and angst of each stage of life, from the stings and sorrows of rejection and loss to feelings of ineptitude, boredom, and desire to the sustaining love of family…recommended for fans of family sagas such as those by Anne Tyler and Zadie Smith.” ―Library Journal

About the Author

Emily Perkins was born in 1970. She is the author of Not Her Real Name, a prizewinning collection of short stories that won the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize and was shortlisted for the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize, and the novels Leave Before You Go, The New Girl, and Novel About My Wife, winner of the Believer Book Award.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The latest book club pick from Oprah
"The Underground Railroad" by Colson Whitehead is a magnificent novel chronicling a young slave's adventures as she makes a desperate bid for freedom in the antebellum South. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA; Reprint edition (August 7, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1608196771
  • ISBN-13: 978-1608196777
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 1 x 7.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,362,096 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
This was a selection for my book club otherwise I would never have finished it. I absolutely hated this book! I am an American living in New Zealand so I wanted to love it, but here is an example of everything that is wrong with this story. There is no exploring of this fact, no point to why the author creates this fact about the characters. They could have been anyone from anywhere, or even just kiwis. The rest of the plot continues like this, the book jumping from one meaningless vignette to another. There are no story transitions, just one page we are here, the next page somewhere else in the lives of these completely uninteresting characters. We don't like anyone because we can't get to know anyone, and so don't care about anyone. I found most frustrating that we can never understand anyone's motives.

This is an ordinary story about ordinary people who live boring, uninteresting lives. Why should I care? Why should I waste my time reading about them? Perhaps Perkins' prose is considered "literary" but I just found it annoying. There are pages and pages of detailed descriptions of the most ordinary, every day things, as if she just needed to fill pages. For example, Perkins gives us a full page and a half of Emily making a meal in the most mind numbing detail of ordinary things: "she put the macaroni cheese in the oven and started on the birthday cake. . . . The eggs were thick shelled, hard to crack . . . She sifted flour and baking soda over the wet mixture." And so on, ad infinitum throughout the book.

Nothing really happens in this story, and even when something momentous happens, life changing events that can really alter a person's life, they are just passed over and on to the next vignette. This is not my idea of good literature, just words on a page and I really don't understand all the accolades. My advice is to skip this one,
Comment 6 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
On the surface, 'The Forrests' is not a novel I should have enjoyed as much as I did. It's the life story of a female protagonist, sharing key moments from her childhood and teen years, her decades as a wife and mother, and finally from her senior years. A large part of Dorothy Forrest's world is domestic and even mundane. However, after a few chapters, I was engrossed and bought in; by the middle (when Dorothy is about the same age as I am presently), I was moved and a believer; by the end, I was a fan and a champion for this book. If there is one triumph in 'The Forrests' beyond the impeccable and universally admired prose of Emily Perkins, it is that Dorothy Forrest is the same person throughout, even as she changes with age, experience, heartbreak, depression and new found connections with her past. There are large jumps in time between vignettes from Dorothy's life, with more left unsaid than said. At this year's Ruapehu Writers festival,Perkins told us she hoped readers would continue to come with her as she moved in this sequence, aware of the limits she was testing in some readers. I think she's done it brilliantly.

Strangely, it reminded me of another book that impacted me that I shouldn't have enjoyed: 'The Stone Angel' by Margaret Lawrence, required reading in my Grade 12 (Year 13 ) English class. Or, at least, 'The Forrests' left me with impressions similar to the way I remember experiencing Lawrence's tale of 90 year old Hagar Shipley. It is ironic that 'The Forrests' has been criticised as a series of vignettes, as Lawrence's novel, also written as vignettes, is acclaimed as one the greatest Canadian novels of all time. Looking at reviews of both books on Goodreads, they are lauded and lambasted for similar reasons and it would seem there is no middle ground.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I found this to be rather a strange book, and the main character being far too self-absorbed for my liking.....and I felt mostly quite detached from the characters
However, I found the book to be really nostalgic, especially the early part, when their were so many anecdotes reminding me of the fun, the imagination, the sensory experiences and the adventures of my childhood. How simple life seemed to me then ... but it was certainly not simple for Evelyn and her siblings as they coped with the foibles of hippie parents.
The nostalgia made the book for me - without it, I would probably have been quite bored.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
What I loved:

The prose. Whatever the scene, whatever the era, Perkins somehow manages to evoke the most vivid, startling and real imagery from her writing. I particularly admired her word-smithery in regards to swearing. For most authors swearing has mere shock value. Perkins has a strange talent throwing around (mostly F-bombs) in an oddly artistic fashion, matched only by her ability to sexually charge a scene.

What I didn't quite get:

Despite the above mentioned power-prose the story was hard to get into. The Forrests is populated with interesting characters and equally interesting events, however due to the style it was hard to get grounded and feel really compelled by the characters. For me personally it felt like every time I cared about was going on, the time-line moved and something else started happening.

Some have suggested this is the point of The Forrests, after all: real life moves on before we get to see the resolutions we want. Someone did warn me that as a runner up to the Booker prize, this novel might be a quite 'literary'

In totality, The Forrests is a powerful read, but only if you're looking for it. I wouldn't recommend treading here if you want (melo)drama ridden storylines with happy endings.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

The Forrests
Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more about Amazon Giveaway
This item: The Forrests