Enter your mobile number below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.
Getting the download link through email is temporarily not available. Please check back later.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$3.04
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by hippo_books
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good: Cover and pages show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fortune's Bastard Paperback – Bargain Price, August 17, 2004

4.0 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback, Bargain Price, August 17, 2004
$4.97 $3.04

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details

Julian Fellowes's Belgravia by Julian Fellowes
"Julian Fellowes's Belgravia" by Julian Fellowes
From the creator and writer of Downton Abbey comes a grand historical novel, with hugely exciting twists and dramatic chapter endings. Learn more | See author page
click to open popover

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

A much-loathed London tabloid editor and philandering father of one gets his comeuppance in British author Chalmers's (Who's Who in Hell) devilishly indulgent, surrealistic second novel. Arrogant Edward Miller has employees who decorate his back with airmail stickers and a wife who announces her own infidelity and dumps him at their anniversary dinner. Soothing his bruised ego at a West End club, Edward is offered cocaine, and indulges in a night wild enough to get his photograph plastered in the newspapers the following day; news that his house has burned down comes as the last straw. He shaves his head and runs off to teach English in Barcelona, but is forced to flee again when he's spotted—his wife, Elizabeth, wants to finalize a divorce settlement and there's a warrant for his arrest on arson charges—moving on to Plant City, Fla., a town populated with stock carnival freaks and governed by sadistic, legless boss Vincent ("Half-Man") Makin, who holds him hostage at a trailer park. With inside help, Edward plots Vincent's murder just as his past life resurfaces in a surprise showdown. It's the circus freaks who prove to be the most fun (and who teach Edward some much-needed lessons), though this wacky ride is piloted by a strong central character witty and captivating enough to make for plenty of sinfully rich reading.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

A spontaneous seduction prompts a surreal chain of events in this raucous new novel from the author of Who's Who in Hell (2002). When London tabloid editor Edward Miller and a nubile temporary secretary emerge from the office supply cabinet with a surfeit of airmail stamps plastered to their backs, the news soon reaches Miller's fetching but frosty wife, Elizabeth. The guilt-ridden newsman numbs himself with several nosefuls of cocaine at a popular London media hangout, a career-leveling move given his paper's strict antidrug stance. With his life's losses piling up (suspiciously, his house has burned to the ground), Miller decides it's time to get out of London. After a teaching gig in Barcelona goes bust, he finds himself in a Florida town of carnies and circus freaks run by a legless sadist known as Half Man. Amidst a melange of misfits, Miller may have finally found a place to belong. A notch more debauched than the novels of fellow Brit Nick Hornby, this is a wry, writhing tale about the forces that shape our fate. Allison Block
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New York Times best sellers
Browse the New York Times best sellers in popular categories like Fiction, Nonfiction, Picture Books and more. See more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Grove Press, Black Cat (August 17, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802141609
  • ASIN: B004JZX4GE
  • Product Dimensions: 8.4 x 5.6 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,035,444 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
What a schizophrenic book. The first half-- following its hapless anti-hero through a series of escalating mortifications--is a great, funny read--Chalmers possesses a real mordant wit. However, the minute our hero steps foot onto the super-heated tarmac of deepest, darkest Central Florida, the book spirals into a surreal gumbo of tooth-breaking violence, tin-eared dialogue, and every "Suhthun" stereotype known to man. Being a Floridian myself, the factual discrepancies rife in this book were jarring and distracting. How disappointing.
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
I had this book given to me, but I would have happily paid (used price only) for it. Yes, it's really two novels, two storys: the thoroughly-flawed protagonist's self-powered post-it flagged descent into a personal hell presided over by a sneering bitch and back-stabbing former colleagues and his coke-powered launch into Spain in no way prepared him for an encounter with a crippled circus troupe in backwater Florida, who, had Dante known them, might have given them a special hell of their own. This is black humor at its sickest. Don't give it to your Mother, unless she's already written her will.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Very interesting book. There are twists and turns you wouldn't expect unless you read the back cover first. And we come to why it's only 4 1/2 instead of five. The back gives it all away!

It does compare to "Geek Love" (a book that should also be picked up if your stomach can take it) but in a more appealing way. You could read this in almost three sittings as we go over the three stages in his life we get to witness.

My suggestion; read this then "Geek Love" and don't read the back cover!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Alive.

This is the last word in Chalmer's first novel, the otherwise well-written Who's Who in Hell. It is also the main theme of the cover work for Fortune's Bastard, and indeed, the theme of the book itself. Where as horror and Gothic writers have a love affair with death, Chalmer's seems to love contrasting death with being alive.

Fortune's Bastard is the story of Edward Miller, the editor of a Daily Mail-like racist, fascist tabloid that remains unnamed throughout. Miller himself is a hardcore racist and while his paper supports the Conservatives, he's such a caricature of the anti-PC set, he probably votes for the Nazi party. He's a hard-liner, a neo-con, a right-winger, and much like the recent Republicans of Note, he's diddling he's secretary, and much like our favorite conservative lackey, Miller gets caught. From the moment our womanizing hero steps out of the closet where he's been banging his assistant and steps into the cafeteria, his life as he knew it is officially over. As the title suggests, from here on out, he is Fortune's Bastard.

(One should note, Fortune's Bastard is the American title for the book, and represents a great step forward for Chalmers in how he titles things, as the title now reflects the overall theme of the book. "Who's Who in Hell" referred to a book that Linnel only briefly works on and has no other meaning or representation within the story. The same goes for the original UK title of Fortune's Bastard, "East of Nowhere" which refers to a short part of the novel that seems to be more of a short story that never went anywhere than anything else.)

The biggest problem with Fortune's Bastard is that, as has been pointed out before, it seems to be two halves of two separate novels.
Read more ›
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Kevin P. Hanson on December 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
I rarely read a book more than once, even some of my favorites. But this one has so much fun in it, I needed to read it twice.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse